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More English Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs
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More English Fairy Tales (original 1894; edition 1968)

by Joseph Jacobs

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9013208,005 (3.94)1
Many of the earliest children's books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. Pook Press are working to republish these classic works in affordable, high quality, colour editions, using the original text and artwork so these works can delight another generation of children.… (more)
Member:malinablue
Title:More English Fairy Tales
Authors:Joseph Jacobs
Info:Dover Publications Inc. (1968), Paperback, 243 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:fairy tales and folklore, dover, dover folklore and myth, folklore collections, fairy tales folklore and mythology, bedroom library

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More English Fairy Tales by Joseph Jacobs (1894)

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English (11)  Dutch (2)  All languages (13)
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This is the companion book to English Fairy Tales, also compiled by Joseph Jacobs. Years ago, I obtained the first book but was unable to get the second volume. I was very pleased to win a copy through the LT Early Reviewers.

As the title states, this is a collection of fairy tales, originally collected during the Victorian era. As such, many of them are quite different from what we today think of as a fairy tale. While some of the tales have a moral (as all good fairy tales do), many appear (to our modern senses) to be unfinished or only partly related, a couple even seem to stop in mid story. Some of the tales relate to things that many folks in our modern world may not have knowledge of.

Having said that, if the reader is a collector or student of fairy or folk tales, this is a worthy book to add to one's collection. I have a fair number of collections, and many of these fairy tales do not appear in my other books. At the end of the book is a section of about 20 pages of notes and references which gives the sources of most of the fairy tales. In some ways, this is one of the best features of the book, specially if one wishes to cross reference the tales with other versions and sources.
  zandoria | Apr 17, 2012 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
As a collector of fairy tales and folklore collections, I was eager to find yet another publisher of long out-of-print Victorian-era publications. Pook Publishers, the publisher of this book, was an exciting new find, as they seem to specialize in just that area. However, i was a tad disappointed. Their books aren't bad, but they aren't amazing either. Compared to Dover, another publisher in this area, they fall flat. Pook does many of the same titles, but their prices are much, much higher and the books are not high-quality. They also do this infuriating little thing where they publish the same title in multiple versions, one priced much higher, and no apparent reason for it. It turns out that the higher-priced books have color illustrations, while the others have merely black and white. But that is not at all clear when ordering. Their books are also published some in paperback, some hardcover. If they did that for each title, I'd have no problem. But some are only paperback and others only hardcover and I find that annoying also, as when I collect a series, I like it to be consistent. And then, since their books are rather hard-to-find, I am just never sure if I am missing a hardcover or they never produced it? I would always choose hardcover, with color illustrations. But their hardcovers with color illustrations are just way too pricey - some as high as $60. If they were high-quality books, I'd spring for it. But they seem about the same as Dover and Dover is far cheaper and has far more titles. I think I will stick to them.
  malinablue | Dec 20, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
This is a nice addition to my collection of books on fairy tales. The illustrations are simple but charming, and while I wouldn't rank this book as my favorite, it is definitely packed full with stories appropriate for people of all ages. ( )
  Kegsoccer | Apr 27, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
The thought of offering up older, obscure titles in new, affordable form is a delightful one. While the format of the book (trade paperback with less-than-perfect print quality) is not as conducive to a positive reading experience as would be a richly made hardcover, the point here is accessibility and I think Pook Press has moderately succeeded.

The tales themselves are a mix of the familiar ("The Pied Piper") and the forgotten ("The Stars in the Sky"). As was typical of Victorian folk tale collections, Jacobs claims as English many tales that have a considerably more international heritage ("The Black Bull of Norroway" is one example, but also represented here are tales like "Tattercoats" and others whose twins appear in Grimm, etc.). It's pleasant to revisit old friends here and equally enjoyable to find new acquaintances. Jacobs' attempt at local dialects -- again typical of his era -- can be occasionally annoying to the modern reader, but always make for fun reading aloud.

While this isn't the first fairy tale book I would hand a child, I do think it's worthy of any good collection. ( )
1 vote beserene | Mar 26, 2011 |
This review was written for LibraryThing Early Reviewers.
Yet another LT win. I was a little iffy about the prospect when reading the introduction, wherein the author states that he made some changes to some of the stories, including rewriting endings. I didn't think I'd know which stories had changed and how. But after the first two or three stories, I discovered the notes section in back. (Yes, I'm one of the about three people in the world who actually read the endnotes in a book.) The notes were scrupulous in the way of folklorists, listing where and by whom the story was collected, possible origins, parallels to other fairy tales, and in what ways it was changed by the author. So not only is it a great collection of English (the author's definition of English seems to include all countries in the British Isles, as stories from Ireland and Scotland are included) fairy tales. I don't care for Tamlane as much in prose; I adore it as a ballad.

I'm not quite sure how I feel about the fact this is a facsimile reproduction. Part of me finds it pretty nifty--you can tell when this was originally printed (centurywise) by the look of the book. But the publishing professional in me sometimes gets distracted by the extra spaces at the end of sentences and the somewhat broken type. All in all, a small issue and one I can overlook easily. ( )
  PirateJenny | Feb 16, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Joseph Jacobsprimary authorall editionscalculated
Batten, John DIllustratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Batten, John DicksonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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