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Flop Ear by Guido Van Genechten
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He's an endearing little rabbit with one ear that simply refuses to stand up straight--the way every other rabbit's ears always stand up. That's why everybody calls him Flop Ear. Kids who read this story and smile over the pictures will think he's cute. But Flop Ear doesn't think so. Flop Ear is sad because he isn't the same as all the other rabbits. "Lop-ear Flop Ear!" they laugh at him. This charming story describes Flop Ear's humorous attempts to make his ear stand up straight. He wants to be like everyone else. But at last he realizes that sometimes, it's just as good to be different. Full-color illustrations on every page of this charming book. (Ages 3-6)
  wichitafriendsschool | Mar 25, 2016 |
This is the story about a rabbit who is very unhappy with his ears because they look different than the ears of other rabbits. One hangs down and one stands up. Everybody is making fun of him because of that, so he tries everything to solve this problem. He even goes to the doctor. When he comes back to the rabbits they are very happy to see him again because it was so boring without him. Everyone wants to see his new ear trick and he is very happy about being different and being accepted. It's a very nice book to show children that being different is a good thing and that everyone is unique. ( )
  rgraf1 | Apr 23, 2013 |
This is a typical story authors tell. I felt it could have been more creative. But the book still deliver messaged that we are all the same no matter the outward appearance. ( )
  Janee23 | Sep 20, 2012 |
What a cute book! I loved how the character, even though other rabbits made fun of him for his ear, he learned to accept himself. Once he did this, the other rabbits were able to accept him for who he was too. This is a great lesson for children, saying that everyone has their differences but you should just accept them! The illustrations were also great!
  kedwards1991 | Sep 14, 2012 |
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0764117629, Paperback)

With this sweet gift set, young kids can cuddle up with an adorable stuffed bunny and read all about accepting differences. Flop-Ear the bunny, like Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer, has a problem. All the other rabbits laugh and call him names because one of his ears flops down, in spite of all his earnest efforts: wedging a carrot in it, wrapping it up with bandages, or attaching it to a clothespin on the end of a fishing pole. It takes some mature contemplation (and a trip to a wise doctor) to convince him that it's okay to be different.

Guido Van Genechten's whimsical illustrations are tremendously appealing; the story, however, is a bit weak. The ending, especially, is perplexing: Flop-Ear returns to his tormenting peers, who admit they've been bored without having him around (to tease, presumably). When they see that their lop-eared pal has stopped playing the victim, they suddenly want to be just like him, thus defeating the message that there's nothing wrong with being different. Still, the cute pictures and plush toy will provide a great starting place for discussions about differences. Teeny-tiny print, though--get out your magnifying glass! (Ages 3 to 6) --Emilie Coulter

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:25:04 -0400)

The other rabbit children tease Flop-Ear because his ears look different than theirs. Can Flop-Ear find a way to fix his ears, or is there another solution to his problem?

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