HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Street by Lee Gruenfeld
Loading...

The Street

by Lee Gruenfeld

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
22None476,730 (5)None

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0385501501, Hardcover)

Just in time for the dot-com meltdown, Lee Gruenfeld shows off his considerable knowledge of the New Economy in The Street, a novel that tries hard to turn the ups and downs of the IPO market into the stuff of thriller fiction--and almost succeeds. James Vincent Hanley is a wage slave on Wall Street who decides to turn his insider knowledge into a start-up. Armed with a brilliant business plan and little else, Hanley bamboozles enough big-business types who ought to know better into backing Artemis-5, which he bills as the next new thing. His high-powered board and the money-crazed denizens of Wall Street are convinced that a company with no products, no services, and no expectation of profits is the smartest idea since sliced bread.

At first, the unlikely new company is more successful than Hanley ever dreamed. The money's rolling in, and Hanley is well on his way to winning a huge pot in the stock market poker game. Then an SEC enforcer named Thurgren starts sniffing around Artemis-5, and the whole enterprise threatens to collapse. Like Hanley, Thurgren has a mole on the inside of his opponent's operation--and thereby hangs the tale.

The Street, while intermittently entertaining and a good introduction to New Economics 101, is plagued by improbable scenarios and a paucity of character development. Gruenfeld can't seem to decide whether he's writing satire or suspense. The entire charade will make sense only to those who believe that the stock market operates according to rational principles and that there is such a thing as a free lunch. --Jane Adams

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:03 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
2 avail.

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (5)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4
4.5
5 1

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,408,086 books! | Top bar: Always visible