HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Little Children: A Novel by Tom Perrotta
Loading...

Little Children: A Novel (2004)

by Tom Perrotta

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
2,942961,953 (3.64)62
  1. 21
    Revolutionary Road by Richard Yates (writemeg)
  2. 21
    Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert (Cecilturtle)
  3. 00
    Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: Unexpected disruptions to everyday routines cause otherwise comfortable suburban communities to unravel in these witty, character-driven novels. However, one shocking catalyst drives the plot of Big Little Lies, whereas various factors contribute to the drama in Little Children.… (more)
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 62 mentions

English (95)  Portuguese (1)  All languages (96)
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
I added this book to my list a couple years ago on the recommendation of a friend who knows that I like strange and dark books, specifically after we both read and loved A Reliable Wife. This book is definitely nothing like Goolrick's well-known novel. It is instead much more like someone took Desperate Housewives and decided it would make a good book. Given that it wasn't even that good a series, someone should have rethought that plan.

Sarah is a young, disillusioned stay at home mother to her three year old, Lucy. She spends her days visiting local playgrounds, interacting with other women she doesn't like at all. Her husband Richard, has an internet porn problem. When she meets Tood, a stay at home father to own three year old there is an instant spark, and within minutes she is kissing him in full view of the other park moms, their children swinging blissfully unaware. This results in a steamy affair that lasts throughout the summer, while the rest of the town is obsessing over the presence of convicted sex offender Ronnie McGorvey.

What did I say; does that sound like an episode of Desperate Housewives or not? Besides the over the top drama of this book, it suffered from having too many storylines going at one time. There is Sarah and Todd's affair. Todd's personal life. Sarah's personal life. Richard, Sarah's porn-crazed husband. Ronnie McGorvey. Larry Moon: former cop, Todd's friend, harrasser of Ronnie. Mary Ann Moser, queen of the playground moms who thinks she has all the answers and discovers she has none. May McGorvey, Ronnie's long-suffering mother. It was confusing switching back and forth between all their stories and unneccessary. If the author had chosen to focus on just a few, I think it could have improved this book quite a bit. I have read that Little Children is supossed to be a biting commentary of suburban life, but if that is the case, it failed by a long shot, coming across as nothing more than chick lit that actually gave the men in it's pages a role as something more than the object of the "heroine's" relationship fairytale. It was better written than most chick lit though, so it's at least got that going for it, and it's the only reason why this book didn't get a two star rating from me.

I listened to the audiobook, which may have even further detracted from the book. It was read by George Wilson, who while he did a fine and believable job with the male characters, was a very poor choice to read the women who populated the pages of this book. This novel may have been well-served to have multiple readers.

If you like chick-lit or Desperate Housewives, you would probably enjoy this book. If neither of those is your thing, then you should skip this book and find something more your speed. It definitely didn't deliver on the suburban social commentary that was promised and I doubt I'll be reading anything else by this author any time soon, if at all. ( )
  Mootastic1 | Jan 15, 2016 |
I've read this book at least four times before, but apparently never reviewed it. It's always been one of my favorites, and Perrotta has always been one of my favorite authors. He's incredibly honest about the ups and downs in relationships, and how marriages ebb and flow. I love that there's not a happy ending, just a realistic one. I also love how all of his characters seem like real people, and I wonder about them long after I finish the last page. ( )
  howifeelaboutbooks | Nov 4, 2015 |
I really don't think I have anything particularly insightful to say about Perotta's Little Children. Essentially, I found it to be a readable, likeable book about some mostly unlikeable people,and some of those were remarkably unlikable. Several times as I read I thought, "are there really adult men who are as big a goober as Larry Moon?" Course there are, but I suppose I have steered clear of them. Todd, "the prom king", is a sweet enough guy, but thoroghly confused. In fact, all the central characters are confused, confused about how they have washed up on the shore of adulthood so completely ill-equipped and so desperately off the mark from what their earlier lives seemed to promise. However, other authors have treated the same theme with greater power. One would be Ford with his brilliant Revolutionary Road, a book which, I believe, was published the same year as Tom Perotta and I were born. Revolutionary Road was perfectly nuanced, hitting a deeper chord of truth and emotion. Often described as a writer of darkly comic books, Perotta may allow this stance to water down the possible poignancy and intensity of his story.

( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
I really don't think I have anything particularly insightful to say about Perotta's Little Children. Essentially, I found it to be a readable, likeable book about some mostly unlikeable people,and some of those were remarkably unlikable. Several times as I read I thought, "are there really adult men who are as big a goober as Larry Moon?" Course there are, but I suppose I have steered clear of them. Todd, "the prom king", is a sweet enough guy, but thoroghly confused. In fact, all the central characters are confused, confused about how they have washed up on the shore of adulthood so completely ill-equipped and so desperately off the mark from what their earlier lives seemed to promise. However, other authors have treated the same theme with greater power. One would be Ford with his brilliant Revolutionary Road, a book which, I believe, was published the same year as Tom Perotta and I were born. Revolutionary Road was perfectly nuanced, hitting a deeper chord of truth and emotion. Often described as a writer of darkly comic books, Perotta may allow this stance to water down the possible poignancy and intensity of his story.

( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
I really don't think I have anything particularly insightful to say about Perotta's Little Children. Essentially, I found it to be a readable, likeable book about some mostly unlikeable people,and some of those were remarkably unlikable. Several times as I read I thought, "are there really adult men who are as big a goober as Larry Moon?" Course there are, but I suppose I have steered clear of them. Todd, "the prom king", is a sweet enough guy, but thoroghly confused. In fact, all the central characters are confused, confused about how they have washed up on the shore of adulthood so completely ill-equipped and so desperately off the mark from what their earlier lives seemed to promise. However, other authors have treated the same theme with greater power. One would be Ford with his brilliant Revolutionary Road, a book which, I believe, was published the same year as Tom Perotta and I were born. Revolutionary Road was perfectly nuanced, hitting a deeper chord of truth and emotion. Often described as a writer of darkly comic books, Perotta may allow this stance to water down the possible poignancy and intensity of his story.

( )
  lucybrown | Sep 27, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
"I have a lover! I have a lover!" she kept repeating to herself, reveling in the thought as though she were beginning a second puberty.
--Flaubert, Madame Bovary
Dedication
In memory of my father, Joe Perrotta
First words
The young mothers were telling each other how tired they were.
Quotations
Not everything is God's will. If your VCR's broken, you don't take it to a priest. You take it to the VCR guy.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312315732, Paperback)

Tom Perrotta's thirty-ish parents of young children are a varied and surprising bunch. There's Todd, the handsome stay-at-home dad dubbed "The Prom King" by the moms of the playground; Sarah, a lapsed feminist with a bisexual past, who seems to have stumbled into a traditional marriage; Richard, Sarah's husband, who has found himself more and more involved with a fantasy life on the internet than with the flesh and blood in his own house; and Mary Ann, who thinks she has it all figured out, down to scheduling a weekly roll in the hay with her husband, every Tuesday at 9pm.

They all raise their kids in the kind of sleepy American suburb where nothing ever seems to happen-at least until one eventful summer, when a convicted child molester moves back to town, and two restless parents begin an affair that goes further than either of them could have imagined. Unexpectedly suspenseful, but written with all the fluency and dark humor of Perrotta's previous novels, Little Children exposes the adult dramas unfolding amidst the swingsets and slides of an ordinary American playground.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:11:38 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

A group of young suburban parents, including a stay-at-home dad, a former feminist, and an over-structured mom, finds its sleepy existence shattered when a convicted child molester moves back into town and two of the parents have an affair.

» see all 7 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
391 avail.
35 wanted
2 pay4 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.64)
0.5
1 19
1.5 8
2 63
2.5 16
3 255
3.5 75
4 350
4.5 34
5 156

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Store | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 105,827,090 books! | Top bar: Always visible