HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Tales of Land and Sea by Joseph Conrad
Loading...

Tales of Land and Sea

by Joseph Conrad

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
143283,804 (4.23)3

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 3 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
INCLUDES: YOUTH, HEART OF DARKNESS, THE NIGGER OF THE NARCISSUS,IL CONDE, GASPER RUIS,THE BRUTE,TYPHOON,THE SECRET SHARER,FREYA OF THE SEVEN ISLES,THE DUEL,THE EIND OF THE TETHER, THE SHADOW LINE.
  rjs317 | Dec 26, 2008 |
Book Review

Title: Tales Of Land and Sea

Author: Joseph Conrad

Previously reviewed was one of Joseph Conrad’s books titled “Heart Of Darkness“. This book, Tales Of Land and Sea, is a compilation of several of Conrad’s books.

The first title is “Youth“, and it is an exuberant tale exalting the optimism and sense of in -vulnerability of youth. Marlow, the central character, is in his early 20s and ships on a schooner as second mate. He’s intrigued by the ship’s motto, “Do or Die”. The ship’s name is “JUDEA” and this appeals to his romanticism and to his youth.

The Judea is old, its cargo is 600 tons of coal bound for the Far East. The Judea suffers many severe tests. Each one offers Marlow the opportunity to cope with the challenges and enjoy his successes. He revels in his youthful energy and hardiness.

The final catastrophe to befall the Judea is a spontaneous combustion fire in the coal cargo. By this time however the China Sea has been reached, one of Marlow’s goals. When the burning ship is abandoned Marlow is put in charge of one of the lifeboats. This is the culmination of his desire to be a captain. Youth has been served.

The second tale is “The Nigger Of The Narcissus”. This tale revolves about a black crewman who, from the start, complains of being too ill to work. His duties must be taken over by others, some of whom complain while others feel compassion for the man. The crew has a trouble maker who almost foments a mutiny. The sine qua non of all sea tales is the horrible storm which makes it’s dutiful appearance. Through heroic action on the part of all the crew the ship survives. The oldest crew member, something of a seer, foretells the death of the afflicted man, “as soon as land is sighted”.. This occurs and he is buried at sea.

The third book is entitled Il Conde, and it is a brief story set in a resort on the Mediterranean coast. As with most all of Conrad’s tales it has a dark aspect to it. Il Conde, the Count, is at the resort for his health. He’s elderly and requires the mild climate. He enjoys simply roaming around the streets and cafes and watching the people. One evening he is accosted by a young man at knife point and robbed. Although shaken by the experience he tries to calm himself and resume his leisurely style.

He had been able to deprive his assailant of a gold piece he carried as an emergency measure. While sitting in a cafe he is surprised to see the man who was his robber. He inquires of a waiter who the young man is. He is told that the youth is of a very good family but that he is a member of a Mafia type band of ruffians.

Unfortunately as the man leaves the café he passes the Count and recognizes him. Stopping briefly he hisses that apparently he had not been given all of the Count’s money. “We’ll meet another time” he states.

This situation so unnerves the Count that he decides in spite of the ill effects to his health he dare not stay and so he returns to his home. It was a typical Conrad conundrum. The count felt doomed one way or the other

Another book in the series is titled “Typhoon”. This tale could well be a prototype for Jaeger’s “The Perfect Storm“. In both instances the reader is wracked by the vivid descriptions of great, monumental storms at sea. The courage and fortitude of simple seamen and their ability to withstand the tremendous onslaught of hurricane force winds and waves is ably depicted by Conrad. He also works in a morality motif. In this instance a seemingly not too bright captain, by virtue of his adherence to his sense of right and fairness, brings the matter to a successful conclusion .
  Swampslogger | Mar 19, 2007 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

No descriptions found.

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.23)
0.5
1
1.5
2 1
2.5
3 1
3.5
4 3
4.5 1
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 119,995,044 books! | Top bar: Always visible