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Bartleby by Herman Melville
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Bartleby (original 1853; edition 1997)

by Herman Melville, Benjamin Orteski (Postface)

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1,621544,473 (3.89)73
Member:clairwitch
Title:Bartleby
Authors:Herman Melville
Other authors:Benjamin Orteski (Postface)
Info:Mille et une nuits (1997), Poche, 80 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall Street by Herman Melville (1853)

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» See also 73 mentions

English (43)  French (3)  German (2)  Italian (2)  Danish (1)  Spanish (1)  Catalan (1)  Hebrew (1)  English (54)
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
The most readable book by Melville deals with life in a 19th century office. In addition to being a marvelous story, it is also an interesting management book on dealing with a problem employee.
The work has even been staged at a small theater here in Munich ( )
  M_Clark | Apr 26, 2016 |
This is a teeny-tiny story of vast interpretations. First off - who among us wouldn't like to tell their boss "I'd prefer not to" when asked to do some menial or unpleasant task? I know I would. But I wouldn't dare do it, so I could live vicariously through Bartleby. However, it's not just a tale about insubordination. It also speaks to the nature of charity towards others (who may take advantage), mental illness, passive-aggressiveness in the workplace, morality, and alcoholism - to name a few.

If you like a slightly absurdist plot, with a lot of humanity and angst, then this is for you. Plus, it's less than 70 pages. So why not give it a read? ( )
1 vote BooksForYears | Apr 1, 2016 |
This is a teeny-tiny story of vast interpretations. First off - who among us wouldn't like to tell their boss "I'd prefer not to" when asked to do some menial or unpleasant task? I know I would. But I wouldn't dare do it, so I could live vicariously through Bartleby. However, it's not just a tale about insubordination. It also speaks to the nature of charity towards others (who may take advantage), mental illness, passive-aggressiveness in the workplace, morality, and alcoholism - to name a few.

If you like a slightly absurdist plot, with a lot of humanity and angst, then this is for you. Plus, it's less than 70 pages. So why not give it a read? ( )
1 vote BooksForYears | Apr 1, 2016 |
An old classic, listened to this on audio and thoroughly enjoyed it. Laughed out loud in fact, says something for a book when that happens. Would recommend to just about anyone. ( )
  KathyGilbert | Jan 29, 2016 |
Melville hammers on the same idea for way too long in general. He even manages it in such a short piece! ( )
  Jen.ODriscoll.Lemon | Jan 23, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 43 (next | show all)
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I am a rather elderly man.
Quotations
Imagine my surprise, nay, my consternation,
when without moving from his privacy, Bartleby
in a singularly mild, firm voice, replied, “I would prefer not
to.”
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Information from the French Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0974607800, Paperback)

"I prefer not to," he respectfully and slowly said, and mildly disappeared.

Academics hail it as the beginning of modernism, but to readers around the world—even those daunted by Moby-DickBartleby the Scrivener is simply one of the most absorbing and moving novellas ever. Set in the mid-19th century on New York City’s Wall Street, it was also, perhaps, Herman Melville's most prescient story: what if a young man caught up in the rat race of commerce finally just said, "I would prefer not to"?

The tale is one of the final works of fiction published by Melville before, slipping into despair over the continuing critical dismissal of his work after Moby-Dick, he abandoned publishing fiction. The work is presented here exactly as it was originally published in Putnam's magazine—to, sadly, critical disdain.

The Art of The Novella Series

Too short to be a novel, too long to be a short story, the novella is generally unrecognized by academics and publishers. Nonetheless, it is a form beloved and practiced by literature's greatest writers. In the Art Of The Novella series, Melville House celebrates this renegade art form and its practitioners with titles that are, in many instances, presented in book form for the first time.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:15:23 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Wall Street is turned upside-down when Bartleby, a copier, decides he is no longer willing to do it.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 7 descriptions

Legacy Library: Herman Melville

Herman Melville has a Legacy Library. Legacy libraries are the personal libraries of famous readers, entered by LibraryThing members from the Legacy Libraries group.

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Audible.com

4 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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