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A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire,…
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A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4) (original 2005; edition 2007)

by George R.R. Martin

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15,399375119 (3.99)443
Member:djfifitrix
Title:A Feast for Crows (A Song of Ice and Fire, Book 4)
Authors:George R.R. Martin
Info:Bantam (2007), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 784 pages
Collections:Kindle
Rating:***1/2
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A Feast For Crows by George R. R. Martin (2005)

  1. 30
    Terrier by Tamora Pierce (swampygirl)
    swampygirl: Reading this book made me feel like I was rereading all of Pierce's books over again, and this one probably matches up the most closely.
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The War of the Five Kings is all but over with only a few holdouts remaining in the realm, however as Westeros attempts to recover enough before winter hits it appears that more carrion will be on the menu of A Feast for Crows. The fourth installment of George R.R. Martin’s A Song of Ice and Fire series shows the ugly aftermath of war which other fantasy epics seemingly ignore after the triumphant conclusion, but as the middle of Martin’s series begins it shows that politics and opportunists use any situation for their advantage.

Unlike the first three volumes of the series, Martin divided narrative settings in half with some point-of-view characters appearing in Feast while some had to wait until the fifth volume (A Dance with Dragons). With the focus on the events in southern Westeros, primarily King’s Landing and the Riverlands, the story feels more intimate than grand as the previous volumes did. The fallout of Tywin’s death is felt in King’s Landing the most when Cersei takes control and attempts to outshine her father in governance, yet it caught up getting entrapped within her own web of intrigues. Jaime’s story shows a man looking to redeem himself while taking advantage of his dishonorable reputation in wrapping up the war in the Riverlands. Along with the Lannister siblings, readers followed Arya to Braavos where she happened to interact with a traveling Samwell Tarly headed for Oldtown who on his journey sailed around a conspiracy filled Dorne and saw the effects of events among the Ironborn. Within the untouched Vale finds Sansa Stark under a false name watching as Littlefinger schemes to retain power and set up events for the future. Yet Martin’s best writing is following Brienne of Tarth’s quest to find Sansa in the war ravaged hinterland, showing off the results of war upon the land and the populace which is often avoided in other epic fantasy.

While many fans have found the division of the narrative upsetting and following Brienne’s journey annoying, some didn’t realize how much set up Martin was writing for events in the last 40% of A Dance with Dragons as well as the last two books of the series. In the chaos of war’s aftermath just like in battle, anyone can take power and some who thought themselves natural wielders of power are outplayed in the game of thrones. The events in Dorne and the Iron Islands change the completion of the entire series, making it more epic in scale when seen in context of the whole story. One of Martin’s best decisions was to both begin and end in Oldtown with characters introduced in the prologue appearing again at the end from the point-of-view of a favorite character in a sense connecting the whole book together.

A Feast for Crows shows the aftermath of war as well as showing that schemes for power never end, especially as a realm tries to put itself together after it was shattered by war. While not as “epic” as the first three volumes of A Song of Ice and Fire, this book is still a fantastic read on why the game never ends. ( )
  mattries37315 | Aug 24, 2016 |
Re-read so I could better track how the TV show diverges from this narrative. I see it's just skipped most of Jaime's and Brienne's adventures. I was applauding this choice until I re-read; now I'm a bit sorry I'll not see all of B's fights (and internal struggles). Also really liked all the stuff in Dorne, through which I had sort of tapped my foot before. If GR allowed such nuance, I'd bump this up half a star. ( )
  KateSherrod | Aug 1, 2016 |
Somewhat disappointing in the end, mitigated by Martin's apology and explanation that this was one very long book that he decided to break into two ("the full story of half the characters" in each)... ( )
  ShawIslandLibrary | Jul 26, 2016 |
I found myself almost entirely skipping some chapters on characters i did not care for. In hopes of quickly getting to the main characters which i very much am interested in. ( )
  MikeAWalters | Jul 22, 2016 |
This one takes a step back from the previous three in this saga. Martin claims in the back of this novel that he had written so much material for this book that he had to divide it into two novels, the other being my future read, A Dance With Dragons. However, Martin took half the characters and wrote about them in this book, the other half being covered in the upcoming ADWD.

That made this read tougher. While reading about the characters in this novel, I was continually wondering what was going on with the other half. My concern is this saga is now bloating to the point where it is approaching Wheel Of Time glut. In Wheel Of Time novels, you may read about a character in book 3, then pick up his/her story in book 9. Maddening....

That being said, I am looking forward to the next book. Hopefully, at that point I will be ready to tackle the sixth book, if he ever releases it.

There were parts of this book that were enjoyable to read, just not on the scale of the previous books. This one seemed more concerned with establishing political alliances among the seven kingdoms and familial lineage where inheritances were concerned. Important, yes, but page after page of dozens and dozens of potential characters in line for a throne or a lordship produced heavy eyes at times. Here's to hoping that things pick back up soon... ( )
  utbw42 | Jul 11, 2016 |
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In the wrong hands, a big ensemble like this can be deadly, but Martin is a tense, surging, insomnia-inflicting plotter and a deft and inexhaustible sketcher of personalities... this is as good a time as any to proclaim him the American Tolkien.
added by Shortride | editTime, Lev Grossman (Nov 13, 2005)
 

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Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
George R. R. Martinprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Canty, ThomasCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, JohnNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rostant, LarryCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Youll, StephenCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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for Stephen Boucher wizard of Windows, dragon of DOS without whom this book would have been written in crayon
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"Dragons," said Mollander. He snatched a withered apple off the ground and tossed it hand to hand.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 055358202X, Mass Market Paperback)

GAME OF THRONES: A NEW ORIGINAL SERIES, NOW ON HBO.

Few books have captivated the imagination and won the devotion and praise of readers and critics everywhere as has George R. R. Martin’s monumental epic cycle of high fantasy. Now, in A Feast for Crows, Martin delivers the long-awaited fourth book of his landmark series, as a kingdom torn asunder finds itself at last on the brink of peace . . . only to be launched on an even more terrifying course of destruction.

A FEAST FOR CROWS

It seems too good to be true. After centuries of bitter strife and fatal treachery, the seven powers dividing the land have decimated one another into an uneasy truce. Or so it appears. . . . With the death of the monstrous King Joffrey, Cersei is ruling as regent in King’s Landing. Robb Stark’s demise has broken the back of the Northern rebels, and his siblings are scattered throughout the kingdom like seeds on barren soil. Few legitimate claims to the once desperately sought Iron Throne still exist—or they are held in hands too weak or too distant to wield them effectively. The war, which raged out of control for so long, has burned itself out.

But as in the aftermath of any climactic struggle, it is not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters start to gather, picking over the bones of the dead and fighting for the spoils of the soon-to-be dead. Now in the Seven Kingdoms, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed, while surprising faces—some familiar, others only just appearing—are seen emerging from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges ahead.

It is a time when the wise and the ambitious, the deceitful and the strong will acquire the skills, the power, and the magic to survive the stark and terrible times that lie before them. It is a time for nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages to come together and stake their fortunes . . . and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests—but only a few are the survivors.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:22 -0400)

(see all 7 descriptions)

After centuries of bitter strife, the seven powers dividing the land have beaten one another into an uneasy truce. But it's not long before the survivors, outlaws, renegades, and carrion eaters of the Seven Kingdoms gather. Now, as the human crows assemble over a banquet of ashes, daring new plots and dangerous new alliances are formed while surprising faces--some familiar, others only just appearing--emerge from an ominous twilight of past struggles and chaos to take up the challenges of the terrible times ahead. Nobles and commoners, soldiers and sorcerers, assassins and sages, are coming together to stake their fortunes ... and their lives. For at a feast for crows, many are the guests-- but only a few are the survivors.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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