HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Loading...

Looking for Alaska (2001)

by Peter Jenkins

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
372750,128 (3.67)1
More than twenty years ago, a disillusioned college graduate named Peter Jenkins set out with his dog Cooper to look for himself and his nation. His memoir of what he found,A Walk Across America, captured the hearts of millions of Americans. Now, Peter is a bit older, married with a family, and his journeys are different than they were. Perhaps he is looking for adventure, perhaps inspiration, perhaps new communities, perhaps unspoiled land. Certainly, he found all of this and more in Alaska, America's last wilderness. Looking for Alaska is Peter's account of eighteen months spent traveling over twenty thousand miles in tiny bush planes, on snow machines and snowshoes, in fishing boats and kayaks, on the Alaska Marine Highway and the Haul Road, searching for what defines Alaska. Hearing the amazing stories of many real Alaskans--from Barrow to Craig, Seward to Deering, and everywhere in between--Peter gets to know this place in the way that only he can. His resulting portrait is a rare and unforgettable depiction of a dangerous and beautiful land and all the people that call it home. He also took his wife and eight-year-old daughter with him, settling into a "home base" in Seward on the Kenai Peninsula, coming and going from there, and hosting the rest of their family for extended visits. The way his family lived, how they made Alaska their home and even participated in Peter's explorations, is as much a part of this story as Peter's own travels. All in all, Jenkins delivers a warm, funny, awe-inspiring, and memorable diary of discovery-both of this place that captures all of our imaginations, and of himself, all over again.… (more)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 1 mention

Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
This book ended up getting tedious - there is so much information in it that eventually my brain got tired and I had to read leisure books at the same time just to free up some space. There is a lot to absorb, but most of it is interesting. Jenkins really hits every aspect of the Alaskan life, from in-depth discussions of the wild life and hunting, to the native tribes. Through it all you get snippets of his family. Not a bad book if you're interested in the Alaskan lifestyle (the real Alaskan lifestyle) but it gets easily overwhelming and dense. ( )
  SarinaLeigh | Apr 21, 2017 |
Mark Honan
  jmail | Mar 21, 2016 |
The stories in this book make want to go there ( )
  breakitgood | Mar 30, 2013 |
Enjoyable read of a family who lives in Alaska for the purpose of the experience. Since I had been to Alaska and to many of the locations, it was especially meaningful. As I started the book, I thought "I would like to live there for a year." After I finished the book, I decided reading about the experience was enough!!! Jenkins and his family have nerve!!! ( )
  LivelyLady | Sep 26, 2008 |
I'll be honest, my opinion of this book is not unbiased. I was one of the many people who found Walk Across America to be a formative piece that sowed the seeds of wanderlust in me at a young age. Then later on I found Jenkins' book about his journey of faith, and that really excited me because I like it when people I look up to share my faith. It seems pretty clear from this book that Jenkins has left most of that behind. Now divorced, he rarely talked about God in a book about Alaska. If you can see the Aurora and the mountains and all that and not talk about God, how far must you have wandered from your faith? Or fallen prey to a publisher's demands?

Okay, that said...

The stories are great, the people are great, and the pictures that go with them are decent. I love travel books, I love Alaska books. Jenkins waxes poetic about Alaska, but fails to evoke a real "sense of place." He definitely captures the people and the events, but I fail to really feel like I am there. His adventures don't seem spontaneous and accidental, they seem as though he had a list of things his publisher said would make for a good book and he did those things. But those things are still cool!

Worth the read, but it could have been better. ( )
  tkraft | Aug 11, 2008 |
Showing 1-5 of 7 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To my six highly intelligent,extremely creative,hard working,beautiful, and handsome,
perfect children: Julianne, Luke, Jed, Rebekah, Brooke, and Aaron
First words
Four feet of the whitest, most gorgeous snow was on the ground north of Moose Pass, Alaska.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

More than twenty years ago, a disillusioned college graduate named Peter Jenkins set out with his dog Cooper to look for himself and his nation. His memoir of what he found,A Walk Across America, captured the hearts of millions of Americans. Now, Peter is a bit older, married with a family, and his journeys are different than they were. Perhaps he is looking for adventure, perhaps inspiration, perhaps new communities, perhaps unspoiled land. Certainly, he found all of this and more in Alaska, America's last wilderness. Looking for Alaska is Peter's account of eighteen months spent traveling over twenty thousand miles in tiny bush planes, on snow machines and snowshoes, in fishing boats and kayaks, on the Alaska Marine Highway and the Haul Road, searching for what defines Alaska. Hearing the amazing stories of many real Alaskans--from Barrow to Craig, Seward to Deering, and everywhere in between--Peter gets to know this place in the way that only he can. His resulting portrait is a rare and unforgettable depiction of a dangerous and beautiful land and all the people that call it home. He also took his wife and eight-year-old daughter with him, settling into a "home base" in Seward on the Kenai Peninsula, coming and going from there, and hosting the rest of their family for extended visits. The way his family lived, how they made Alaska their home and even participated in Peter's explorations, is as much a part of this story as Peter's own travels. All in all, Jenkins delivers a warm, funny, awe-inspiring, and memorable diary of discovery-both of this place that captures all of our imaginations, and of himself, all over again.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.67)
0.5
1 2
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 14
3.5 7
4 17
4.5 2
5 9

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 151,592,653 books! | Top bar: Always visible