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Owen (Caldecott Honor Book) by Kevin Henkes
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Owen (Caldecott Honor Book) (edition 1993)

by Kevin Henkes, Kevin Henkes (Illustrator)

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1,711954,153 (4.25)3
Member:MissSanchez
Title:Owen (Caldecott Honor Book)
Authors:Kevin Henkes
Other authors:Kevin Henkes (Illustrator)
Info:Greenwillow Books (1993), Edition: 1st, Hardcover, 32 pages
Collections:Your library
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Owen by Kevin Henkes

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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
• Summary of content/review: This story, another fabulous Kevin Henkes’ work, depicts the struggle and worry of a young boy mouse and his attachment to his beloved baby blanket as he starts school.
• Evaluation: This story is easily relatable to young children. It is common that children have detachment issues when starting school, and this story can be used to show the struggle and resolution of the problem. The blanket is representative of comfort, which each child will test in their own way on the first day of school.
• Target audience: PK-2nd grade
• Connection to classroom: This book can be used on the first day of school to talk about feelings of detachment, as well as identifying a story’s problem and how the problem was solved.

Genre: fiction, picturebook

RL.1.7 Use illustrations and details in a story to describe its characters, setting, or events.
  Nall0705 | Oct 31, 2014 |
Great story about special items that are loved by us. Owen loves his blanket and he learns that sometimes its ok to let things that we love go.
  SRThompson | Oct 2, 2014 |
Summary:
The Caldecott Book, "Owen," is the story of a little boy who loves his blanket. Owen takes his blanket literally everywhere. Since school is about to start his parents want him to be able to leave the blanket at home and not be so dependent on it. They begin to talk to their neighbor Mrs. Tweezers about the situation and she gives them ideas to test out on Owen and the blanket. None of her ideas seem to work, so then they have the idea of making the blanket into little handkerchiefs so that it is acceptable for Owen to take them to school.

Personal Reaction:
I really liked this story because when I was younger I had a blanket I had a very strong attachment to so I can relate to where Owen is coming from. I also like how there is actually a reasonable compromise at the end that is suitable for both Owen and his parents.

Classroom Extension Ideas:
1. I think this book would be a really good idea for the first day of preschool for the kids that maybe haven't been away from their family or toys the length of the school day and might be finding the transition to be a hard one.
2. I think this book would be good for talking about compromise, teaching that there can be a common middle ground not just all or nothing sometimes.
  AlexCCrupper | Sep 16, 2014 |
Their was a little mouse named Owen who loved his yellow blanket so much. He did everything with his blanket. Owen would eat, sleep, and play with his blanket. One day his nosy neighbor Mrs.Tweezer commented to Owens parents on how Owen still had his blanket. Owens parents began to worry and began trying to take away Owens blanket but, it didn't work. Mrs. Tweezer told his parents that Owen couldn't be a baby forever and to take away his blanket. The parent's tried but Owen couldn't live without his blanket. Then Owen's mom had and idea, she would make his blanket into handkerchiefs so he could still have his blanket . Owen was happy again and used his handkerchiefs for everything and took them everywhere. Mrs. Tweezer was also pleased. ( )
  lruano | Sep 15, 2014 |
I think all kids can relate to having a special blanket. I don't know that Henkes' ending would really satisfy a child in real life, but the subject matter is enough to engage any child, and his cute mouse expressions are wonderful.

Writing ideas:
- Did/do you have a special blanket/toy/stuffed animal that you always kept/keep with you? Tell us about it!
- Look through the illustrations. How many different feelings can you identify in Owen? What part of his face tells you how he is feeling? Try drawing several faces with different expressions. ( )
  BrianEJanssen | Apr 27, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 95 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Kevin Henkesprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Matthew BroderickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Owen (1995IMDb)
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For Laura
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Owen had a fuzzy yellow blanket.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0688114490, Hardcover)

The clinical name is transitional object, but for young children, a beloved blanket is more like a lifeline. And that's exactly how Owen feels about his baby blanket, fondly named Fuzzy. The Owen-Fuzzy relationship is cruising along smoothly until a nosy neighbor, Mrs. Tweezers, leans over the fence and asks his parents, "Isn't he getting a little old to be carrying that thing around?" With kindergarten just around the corner, Owen's parents wonder if he should in fact relinquish his prized Fuzzy. Kevin Henkes uses his signature mouse characters and jewel-tone watercolors to explore the antics and foils of one mouse-boy, one rag-blanket, and two parents wondering how to help their son kick the habit. This is what Henkes does best--playfully bringing childhood fears and feelings to the surface while portraying real-life parent-child tensions. Mrs. Tweezers, a real sourpuss, is no help at all. She offers terrible over-the-fence advice, such as dipping Fuzzy in vinegar (as if to cure a nail-biting habit) or stealing the blanket in the night.

It is not until the eve of Owen's first day of kindergarten that his mother hatches the perfect solution. Ultimately, she finds a way that Owen can hang on to his first true love while also taking the next step into middle childhood--a solution that suits everyone, including Mrs. Tweezers. Caldecott Honor Book, Horn Book Fanfare Honor List, ALA Notable Book, Boston Globe/Horn Book Honor Book, School Library Journal Best Book of the Year, ALA Booklist Children's Editors' Choice. (Ages 3 and older) --Gail Hudson

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:40:20 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Owen's parents try to get him to give up his favorite blanket before he starts school, but when their efforts fail, they come up with a solution that makes everyone happy.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 2 descriptions

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