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The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate…
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The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11) (original 2004; edition 2004)

by Lemony Snicket, Brett Helquist (Illustrator), Michael Kupperman (Illustrator)

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4,98764912 (3.85)43
Member:brittanygates
Title:The Grim Grotto (A Series of Unfortunate Events, Book 11)
Authors:Lemony Snicket
Other authors:Brett Helquist (Illustrator), Michael Kupperman (Illustrator)
Info:HarperCollins (2004), Hardcover, 352 pages
Collections:Your library, Gates Family Library, Fiction
Rating:*****
Tags:None

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The Grim Grotto by Lemony Snicket (2004)

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» See also 43 mentions

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Having narrowly escaped the clutches of Count Olaf, The Baudelaire orphans lose their newfound companion Quigley, and are saved by a submarine. Inside they meet old friends and new, including a ship captain with many secrets. Together, this group sets out to find the mysterious sugar bowl before Olaf and his troupe get their hands on it.

It's hard to keep putting up reviews of this series because I love it and to say that every time I read a book in this series feels repetitive. But yes, this is a great series, with interesting concepts and 3-dimensional characters who offer fresh ideas and emotions to each new story. The themes of these books are good ones to teach younger readers without being heavy-handed, and the mystery that Handler presents his readers is just as interesting as it has always been. Learning more information about VFD, the schism, and the Baudelaire parents without giving up the entire story keeps readers invested, not just because the mystery is engaging, but also because readers care for the characters suffering through these circumstances. Well-balanced satire, action, and mystery makes The Grim Grotto yet another well-written addition to A Series of Unfortunate Events. ( )
  Rituleen | Jul 24, 2016 |
For me, this wasn't the best book in the series so far. I found Captain Widdershins a bit too annoying and ended up skipping over a lot of dialogue. Overall a good book in the series though and looking forward to reading the next one. I would recommend this book. 4 out of 5 stars. ( )
  Beammey | Jul 23, 2016 |
The children team up with another ridiculous adult, get themselves into a pickle, and are once again tracked down by Count Olaf. There are questions of loyalty and perspective. Once again the youngsters elude their would be captors. ( )
  tjsjohanna | Jul 6, 2016 |
The Baudelaires use a submarine to try to find a hidden grotto that might just hold a secret vital to VFD--but its protected by poisonous mushrooms. And no sooner than they emerge from the grim grotto, than they find that Count Olaf has found them yet again, and that not all of their allies are loyal.

The last chapter is great. After 10 books of being repeatedly failed by every adult they come across (due to the foolishness, weakness, vanity or wickedness of the adults), the Baudelaires finally explicitly reject the proferred adult help, and strike out entirely on their own. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
"It is often difficult to admit that someone you love is not perfect, or to consider aspects of a person that are less than admirable."

"If you are stricken with a great sadness, you may feel as if you have been set aflame, not only because of the enormous pain, but also because your sadness may spread over your life, like smoke from an enormous fire. You might find it difficult to see anything but your own sadness, the way smoke can cover a landscape so that all anyone can see is black. You may find that happy things are tainted with sadness, the way smoke leaves its ashen colors and scents on everything it touches. And you may find that if someone pours water all over you, you are damp and distracted, but not cured of your sadness, the way a fire department can douse a fire but never recover what has been burnt down." ( )
  Glaucialm | Feb 18, 2016 |
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» Add other authors (6 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Snicket, Lemonyprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Snicket, Lemonymain authorall editionsconfirmed
Helquist, BrettIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Kupperman, MichaelIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Curry, TimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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For Beatrice -- Dead women tell no tales. Sad men write them down.
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After a great deal of time examining oceans, investigating rainstorms, and staring very hard at several drinking fountains, the scientists of the world developed a theory regarding how water is distributed around our planet, which they have named "the water cycle."
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0064410145, Hardcover)

It's tough when the things that stand between you and your desired sugar bowl are a host of deadly mushrooms and an uncomfortable diving suit. The unlucky Baudelaire orphans find themselves in deep (once again) in this eleventh book in Lemony Snicket's odd-and-full-of-woe-but-quite-funny Series of Unfortunate Events. In The Grim Grotto, the siblings find themselves headed down Stricken Stream on a broken toboggan when they are spotted by the submarine Queequeg, carrying Captain Widdershins, his somewhat volatile stepdaughter Fiona, and optimistic Phil from Lucky Smells Lumbermill. The adventures that follow as the crew tries to get to the aforementioned sugar bowl before Count Olaf are so horrible that the narrator inserts factual information about the water cycle so that readers will get bored and stop reading the book. It doesn't work. As per usual, readers will want to soak up every awf! ul detail and follow the Baudelaires all the way back to the place we first met them--Briny Beach. (Ages 9 and older) --Karin Snelson

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:48 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Still pursued by the evil Count Olaf, the Baudelaire orphans attempt to reach a very important VFD meeting, but first they must travel in a rattletrap submarine to the Gorgonian Grotto, a dangerous underwater cave, in search of the sugar bowl.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 6 descriptions

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