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The Political Economy of International…
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The Political Economy of International Relations

by Robert Gilpin

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A solid textbook introduction to the three major schools of IPE thought. A decent introduction the issues in IPE in few decades up to the time of writing. A wonderful demonstration of how a smart person can be so wrong. The predictions in the book are wildly off. The economic analysis has all the insight of a NYT article, from which most of it comes. Reading it now is a useful antidote to the silly armchair predictions that come out of establishment thinkers, who all read the NYT and The Economist and then just parrot what other establishment-types are saying. ( )
  jcvogan1 | Feb 8, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0691022623, Paperback)

After the end of World War II, the United States, by far the dominant economic and military power at that time, joined with the surviving capitalist democracies to create an unprecedented institutional framework. By the 1980s many contended that these institutions--the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (now the World Trade Organization), the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund--were threatened by growing economic nationalism in the United States, as demonstrated by increased trade protection and growing budget deficits.

In this book, Robert Gilpin argues that American power had been essential for establishing these institutions, and waning American support threatened the basis of postwar cooperation and the great prosperity of the period. For Gilpin, a great power such as the United States is essential to fostering international cooperation. Exploring the relationship between politics and economics first highlighted by Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and other thinkers of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, Gilpin demonstrated the close ties between politics and economics in international relations, outlining the key role played by the creative use of power in the support of an institutional framework that created a world economy.

Gilpin's exposition of the in.uence of politics on the international economy was a model of clarity, making the book the centerpiece of many courses in international political economy. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, when American support for international cooperation is once again in question, Gilpin's warnings about the risks of American unilateralism sound ever clearer.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:24:43 -0400)

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