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The Secret Garden (Book and Charm) by…
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The Secret Garden (Book and Charm) (original 1911; edition 1998)

by Frances Hodgson Burnett, Tasha Tudor (Illustrator)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
19,81634082 (4.15)685
Member:vancouverdeb
Title:The Secret Garden (Book and Charm)
Authors:Frances Hodgson Burnett
Other authors:Tasha Tudor (Illustrator)
Info:HarperFestival (1998), Paperback, 368 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:*****
Tags:children's fiction, chidren's classic, children's literature

Work details

The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett (1911)

1910s (29)
Garden (1)
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» See also 685 mentions

English (333)  German (3)  Italian (2)  Spanish (1)  All languages (339)
Showing 1-5 of 333 (next | show all)
Fun audiobook with Fiona Hughes reading it. ( )
  MHanover10 | Jul 11, 2016 |
This is a nice children's story of friendship and the power of friendship with others and with nature to heal the soul. Two cousins, both really orphans by emotional and physical absence of parents find each other and find new reasons to live and love. I missed this story when I was growing up so glad to finally have read it. ( )
  Kristelh | Jun 28, 2016 |
I read it often when I was young, and always preferred to stop just where she and Dicken begin healing the Secret Garden. That always seemed the most important point to me: that she save the garden for herself and go there for her own healing.

Fast forward to now, when a friend mentions the connection between her own healing and the healing of those around her. Which is also another good reason for healing oneself first, and that healing of others cannot occur unless one is first healed.

Of course now, the descriptions of Dickens' and Martha's family's straits ring a bit hollow: ten children all happily living and running on the moor. Being kind and jolly while your belly is empty is something only the stratified Victorians could have created.

The basic story is a charming one, of a friendless, helpless, neglected little English girl living in India, becoming an orphan due to yellow fever, and traveling by herself to a strange land with strange customs and strange weather. She learns that she can no longer hit the servant, and that the fresh air of the moors is good, and how to run and be healthy. A good read for any age. ( )
  threadnsong | Jun 18, 2016 |
I watched the movie so many times as a kid I was totally convinced I had read the book. Alas, not so! The ways in which the book is different from the film are quite a surprise to me (Colin doesn't get bathed in ice? Their mothers weren't twins? to name a few silly ones.)

Listened to the lovely Joanna Ward reading of this and enjoyed immensely. ( )
  askajnaiman | Jun 14, 2016 |
This read was, of course, a re-read. I wore out the copy I had as a child, with its lovely illustrations by Tasha Tudor. What's interesting is what a different, but still marvelous, experience it is, reading it again almost 4 decades later. I didn't remember the beginning bit taking place in India. I could've sworn Mary visited, and brought gifts to, Martha's family's cottage. I didn't remember the ending being so abrupt.

Oddly enough, my 'favorite' bit was learning about how to tell if trees and vines are 'wick' or dead. And that part was just as I remembered it.

I read it now with a bit of an eye towards issues. For example, there are some racist comments - but they're made in innocent ignorance and/or by people who are not nice. Another example is that great store is set by beauty, esp. Mary's initial lack of it - but it is made plain that beauty is a sign of physical and 'spiritual' health. The third example of an issue is spiritual health and Christianity - and I love Susan's speech near the end in which she refers to the Joy-Maker" who is known by many names the world over.

This edition does have a scholarly introduction. I have not read it nor do I plan to." ( )
1 vote Cheryl_in_CC_NV | Jun 6, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 333 (next | show all)
[It] will be read with equal pleasure by young people and by those of their elders who love young things, for whom literary craftsmanship is a source of enjoyment and a quiet, beautiful tale attractive.
added by Shortride | editThe New York Times Book Review (pay site) (Sep 3, 1911)
 

» Add other authors (63 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Burnett, Frances Hodgsonprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tudor, TashaIllustratormain authorall editionsconfirmed
Hague, MichaelIllustratormain authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rust, Grahamsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bailey, JosephineNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dahl, SophieIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gibson, FloNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hömke, FriedelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hughes, FinolaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hughes, ShirleyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingpen, RobertIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Karhulahti, SariTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Konigsburg, E. L.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lawrie, RobinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maroney, VanessaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Masterman, DodieIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McCaddon, WandaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mitchell, KathyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robinson, CharlesIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rust, GrahamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rust, GrahamIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
South, AnnaAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tudor, TashaIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Unwin, Nora S.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Veegens-Latorf, E.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, JohannaNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
First words
When Mary Lennox was sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle, everybody said she was the most disagreeable-looking child ever seen.
Quotations
And the roses – the roses! Rising out of the grass, tangled round the sundial, wreathing the tree trunks, and hanging from their branches, climbing up the walls and spreading over them with long garlands falling in cascades – they came alive day by day, hour by hour. Fair, fresh leaves and buds – and buds- tiny at first, but swelling and working Magic until they burst and uncurled into cups of scent delicately spilling themselves over their brims and filling the garden air.
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This is the work for the original text. Please do not combine movies, adaptations, or other shortened editions to this work. Thanks!
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References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
AR 6.3, Pts 13
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 006440188X, Paperback)

Mistress Mary is quite contrary until she helps her garden grow. Along the way, she manages to cure her sickly cousin Colin, who is every bit as imperious as she. These two are sullen little peas in a pod, closed up in a gloomy old manor on the Yorkshire moors of England, until a locked-up garden captures their imaginations and puts the blush of a wild rose in their cheeks; "It was the sweetest, most mysterious-looking place any one could imagine. The high walls which shut it in were covered with the leafless stems of roses which were so thick, that they matted together.... 'No wonder it is still,' Mary whispered. 'I am the first person who has spoken here for ten years.'" As new life sprouts from the earth, Mary and Colin's sour natures begin to sweeten. For anyone who has ever felt afraid to live and love, The Secret Garden's portrayal of reawakening spirits will thrill and rejuvenate. Frances Hodgson Burnett creates characters so strong and distinct, young readers continue to identify with them even 85 years after they were conceived. (Ages 9 to 12)

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:22:40 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

A ten-year-old orphan comes to live in a lonely house on the Yorkshire moors where she discovers an invalid cousin and the mysteries of a locked garden.

(summary from another edition)

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Audible.com

21 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

6 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0142437018, 0142437050, 0141321067, 0141336536, 0143106457, 0141331763

Candlewick Press

2 editions of this book were published by Candlewick Press.

Editions: 0763631612, 0763647322

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Tantor Media

2 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 1400100720, 1400108446

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