HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Holographic Universe by Michael Talbot
Loading...

The Holographic Universe (1991)

by Michael Talbot

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,1831610,295 (3.86)5
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

English (15)  Italian (1)  All languages (16)
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
I've only rated this book a three for the moment because it bears a definite re-reading.

When I first read it many years ago, I seem to recall being blown away by the idea of every bit of ourselves, every bit of information, every memory and every event being stored somewhere in the micro-material of this universe, which is contained within one or more other universes, and which also itself/ourselves contain one or more parallel universes -unseen, but existing and colliding and sometimes even destroying each other or simply ending, even resulting in the creation of other universes.
Actually this inspired the basis for my first practice novel titled Creator: Friend or Foe, which is in My Reading section here on GR if you wish to torture yourself with it -several of my friends say they really liked it! ( )
  ShiraDest | Mar 6, 2019 |
This book was a huge disappointment to me, and a rare instance of a book I did not finish. It dates from 1991, so I expected it not to represent the latest thinking on the subject; but I'm afraid that I found it increasingly rejecting any sort of serious science from about a third of the way in.

The idea of the holographic universe - that what we experience as 'reality' is actually a consensual illusion that we construct on a minute-by-minute basis - is a controversial idea for which there continues to be evidence found and new interpretations offered. So far, so good. And the idea is sufficiently strange that it might indeed explain much that is currently unexplainable. Talbot starts off reasonably well, outlining the careers of David Bohm (a physicist) and Karl Pribram (a neurophysiologist) and their thinking on the question of the nature of physical reality. These first chapters are fairly sound (though it has to be said that an internet search does not turn up much on either scientist that could be considered controversial).

After which, Talbot begins to look at "the brain as hologram", taking as a starting point the fact that our senses are interpreted only within the brain and what we think of as an external reality is actually an internal construction. Again, so far, so good; and the arguments are backed up with what appears to be reasonable expositions of the work of published scientists.

But as the book progresses, the discussion veers further away from science and down the path of anecdote. Michael Talbot has written a number of works on psychic experiences, and he dips more and more into that territory than into verifiable or reasoned scientific discussion. Any further discussion on cosmological matters disappears and we concentrate entirely on psychology and (increasingly) parapsychology. When we got onto regression into past lives, auras and chakras, my patience began to give out. And from about half-way through the book, the style turned into pure Readers' Digest and Talbot began to cite his own psychic experiences. At which point, I gave up, exasperated.

The concept of the holographic universe is important and fascinating. This book should not be your entry point to discussion of the subject. ( )
1 vote RobertDay | Feb 25, 2019 |
First edition, 19991,no ISBN,
  ecasebeer2 | Oct 25, 2011 |
I know intellectually that quantum physics is the domain of some of the strangest phenomena imaginable. I know it may be possible to create a sub-atomic particle merely by searching for it, and that two particles separated by many miles can apparently influence each others behavior in ways that suggest either faster-than-light interaction or that the apparent separation between them is not real. I have read that space as we know it may be illusory, that time as a linear process may also be an illusion. All of these things fascinate me, and books like 'The Dancing Wu-Li Masters,' The Tao of Physics,' and 'The Holographic Universe' by Michael Talbot feed that fascination. These works are challenging, exciting and, by their extraordinary nature, suspect.

We know this era as one of hard-edged rationalism, linear thinking and cynicism. These traits are normal and easy to share because they are so prevalent, and because, really, no socially-engaged human wants to be regarded as a 'loon' (per another reviewer's dismissive remarks). So on one hand, my responsibility as a modern rational human is to dismiss the ideas of writers like Talbot, who take cutting edge physics as a point of departure and spin it into parallel universes, telepathic and clairvoyant explanations, and into all manner of strange and wonderful possibilities. Like other similar books, 'The Holographic Universe' suggests that mysticism and spirituality may provide useful metaphors for phenomena that scientific investigation is only beginning to sense the existence of . . . and will quite probably experience difficulty describing objectively. Predictably, these suggestions remain largely ignored by mainstream science. It is not comfortable or productive for a professional to publicly hold them.

But on the other hand, there is something both intriguing and intuitively truthful about the idea that mind may determine its reality. Talbot's observations about the way in which quantum particles appear to behave according to how the observer thinks about them certainly provokes some thought. Such 'quantum entanglement' has apparently been observed on the molecular level , as well. Is it possible that perception and creation are two sides of one coin? Are we so in charge of our world that it is exactly as we have judged? Perhaps our thinking is too 'hard' at times. Perhaps James Randi's skeptical challenge to 'prove it,' in fact insures the very outcome that he expects. I wonder.
There is in cosmology a kind of dividing line, which separates individuals by the way they choose to think about reality. Either 1) we populate a mechanistic universe in which consciousness has arisen out of the chaos of matter, or 2) the universe as we know it is a property of mind, and matter has arisen from consciousness. So . . . which of these is the fundamental property of reality? Unfortunately, it seems unprovable, one way or the other. As an adult, I have tended to oscillate back and forth on that question.

So, in order to accept the possibility of alternate dimensions, 'higher realms,' or the validity of near-death experiences, a rational thinker must make a decision to accept an argument which is based on circumstantial evidence. That kind of argument is the real stock-in-trade of 'The Holographic Universe,' if not most calls for acceptance of the numinous. Talbot cites volumes of near-death accounts in which the experiencer corroborates exact operating room procedures; countless telepathic and clairvoyant 'coincidences'; accounts of past-lives remembered under hypnosis in which buildings and geographical layouts are later supported by visits to actual locations. Investigating the sheer volume of notes and references Talbot cites causes that evidence to become weighty indeed. But is it sufficient?

Finally, one must decide for oneself. And continue the search. Good luck! ( )
4 vote CosmicBullet | Jan 17, 2011 |
A MUST READ! ( )
  V1LL1N | Apr 15, 2010 |
Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
The new data are of such far-reaching relevance that they could revolutionize our understanding of the human psyche, of psychopathology, and of the therapeutic process. Some of the observations transcend in their significance the framework of psychology and psychiatry and represent a serious challenge to the current Newtonian-Cartesian paradigm of Western science. They could change drastiscally our image of human nature, of culture and history, and of reality. - Dr. Stanislav Grof on holographic phenomena in The Adventure of Self-Discovery
Dedication
For Alexandra, Chad, Ryan, Larry Joe, and Shawn, with love
First words
In the movie Star Wars, Luke Skywalker's adventure begins when a beam of light shoots out of the robot Artoo Detoo and projects a miniature three-dimensional image of Princess Leia.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
Quasi tutti conoscono gli ologrammi, immagini tridimensionali proiettate nello spazio per mezzo di un laser. Ora, due grandi scienziati - David Böhm, fisico quantistico presso la University of London e Karl Pribram, neurofisiologo di Stanford, uno degli artefici della nostra attuale concezione del cervello suppongono che l'universo stesso sia organizzato come un ologramma, in cui ogni parte contiene il tutto. Questo nuovo modo di considerare l'universo dovrebbe chiarire non solo molti degli enigmi insoluti della fisica, ma anche quegli accadimenti misteriosi come la telepatia, le esperienze extracorporee e di premorte, i sogni "lucidi", e perfino le esperienze religiose e mistiche di unità cosmica e le guarigioni miracolose.
(piopas)
Today nearly everyone is familiar with holograms, three-dimensional images projected into space with the aid of a laser. 

Now, two of the world's most eminent thinkers -- University of London physicists David Bohm, a former protege of Einstein's and one of the world's most respected quantum physicists, and Stanford neurophysiologist Karl Pribram, one of the architects of our modern understanding of the brain -- believe that the universe itself may be a giant hologram, quite literally a kind of image or construct created, at least in part, by the human mind. 

This remarkable new way of looking at the universe explains not only many of the unsolved puzzles of physics, but also such mysterious occurrences as telepathy, out-of-body and near death experiences, "lucid" dreams, and even religious and mystical experiences such as feelings of cosmic unity and miraculous healings
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060922583, Paperback)

Today nearly everyone is familiar with holograms, three-dimensional images projected into space with the aid of a laser. Now, two of the world's most eminent thinkers -- University of London physicists David Bohm, a former protege of Einstein's and one of the world's most respected quantum physicists, and Stanford neurophysiologist Karl Pribram, one of the architects of our modern understanding of the brain -- believe that the universe itself may be a giant hologram, quite literally a kind of image or construct created, at least in part, by the human mind. This remarkable new way of looking at the universe explains now only many of the unsolved puzzles of physics, but also such mysterious occurrences as telepathy, out-of-body and near death experiences, "lucid" dreams, and even religious and mystical experiences such as feelings of cosmic unity and miraculous healings.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:23:35 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

Nearly everyone is familiar with holograms - three-dimensional images projected into space with the aid of a laser. Two of the worlds most eminent thinkers believe that the universe itself may be a giant hologram, quite literally a kind of image or construct created, at least in part, by the human mind. University of London physicist David Bohm, a protege of Einstein and one of the worlds most respected quantum physicists, and Stanford neurophysiologist Karl Pribram, an architect of our modern understanding of the brain, have developed a remarkable new way of looking at the universe. Their theory explains not only many of the unsolved puzzles of physics but also such mysterious occurrences as telepathy, out-of-body and near-death experiences, "lucid" dreams, and even religious and mystical experiences such as feelings of cosmic unity and miraculous healings. Now featuring a foreword by Lynne McTaggart, Michael Talbots The Holographic Universe is a landmark work whose exciting conclusions continue to be proven true by todays most advanced physics, cosmology, and string theory.… (more)

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5 3
1 3
1.5
2 8
2.5 1
3 41
3.5 12
4 52
4.5 10
5 53

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 133,345,375 books! | Top bar: Always visible