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The Heidi Chronicles: Uncommon Women and…
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The Heidi Chronicles: Uncommon Women and Others & Isn't It Romantic

by Wendy Wasserstein

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Three plays about women, with a basic feminist theme. They feel somewhat dated now, being so firmly set in the 1970s. The superwomen trying to have it all brought back memories, not necessarily pleasant, as they discussed whether women could, in fact, have it all. The struggle to make it in a world dominated by men, to balance work and life, and to deal with parents, spouses, and lovers, puts strain on the women and challenges their view of themselves. The plays are presented chronologically, so it's possible to see the evolution of the author; it is unfortunate that, like almost all feminist works, it ultimately had to end with a baby - the satisfying of the biological clock, and the sense that this is, indeed, what women are all about. I don't think the author intended that, but it had that feel. That lost it half a star, because schmaltz is always undesirable. ( )
  Devil_llama | May 4, 2014 |
This is, as I noted in my review of The Heidi Chronicles, very Sex and the City in some ways, but a lot more real, and the characters inhabit their privilege with the innocence that comes from growing up in a bubble. Some cute one-liners, and seeing them at school gives you an anchor, even if the school is one of the Seven Sisters and every second line is about some fratboy's Bass Weejuns. (Only, like, what do they call them instead of fratboys? "Lettermen"?) Anyway, I wish all the young women in this play fictional-character luck and hope they don't ruin their fictional children with brittleness and expectations. ( )
  MeditationesMartini | Jun 11, 2010 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0679734996, Paperback)

The graduating seniors of a Seven Sisters college, trying to decide whether to pattern themselves after Katharine Hepburn or Emily Dickinson. Two young women besieged by the demands of mothers, lovers, and careers—not to mention a highly persistent telephone answering machine—as they struggle to have it all. A brilliant feminist art historian trying to keep her bearings and her sense of humor on the elevator ride from the radical sixties to the heartless eighties.

Wendy Wasserstein's characters are so funny, so many-sided, and so real that we seem to know them from their Scene One entrances, though the places they go are invariably surprising. And these three plays—Uncommon Women and Others, Isn't It Romantic, and the Pulitzer Prize-winning The Heidi Chronicles—manage to engage us heart, mind, and soul on such a deep and lasting level that they are already recognized as classics of the modern theater.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:32 -0400)

The graduating seniors of a Seven Sisters college, trying to decide whether to pattern themselves after Katharine Hepburn or Emily Dickinson. Two young women besieged by the demands of mothers, lovers, and careers--not to mention a highly persistent telephone answering machine--as they struggle to have it all. A brilliant feminist art historian trying to keep her bearings and her sense of humor on the elevator ride from the radical sixties to the heartless eighties. Wendy Wasserstein's characters are so funny, so many-sided, and so "real" that we seem to know them from their Scene One entrances, though the places they go are invariably surprising. And these three plays--"Uncommon Women and Others," "Isn't It Romantic," and the Pulitzer Prize-winning "The Heidi" "Chronicles"--manage to engage us heart, mind, and soul on such a deep and lasting level that they are already recognized as classics of the modern theater.… (more)

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