HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Jason and Medea: A Whirlwind of Ruin by…
Loading...

Jason and Medea: A Whirlwind of Ruin

by Matthew Hunter

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
2None2,551,640 (4)None
Recently added bymazzranache, daduwa

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

No reviews
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English

None

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 059534321X, Paperback)

While the ending of the Golden Fleece myth, Medea’s killing of her beloved children, is well known, her story and her reasoning are not. She can be understood through her deeds and words, though she may not be forgiven for her act. Jason, the hero of the Argo who wrested the Golden Fleece from a tyrant at the end of world, in this work is revealed as a man with flaws.

Jason and Medea fully explores the ancient Greek tragedy, following the story line and philosophical trails. The gaps in the ancient telling are filled with imaginative invention without the aid of supernatural forces. Every baby boomer has seen the 60’s movie Jason and the Argonauts with the animated harpies, skeleton warriors and bronze giant. Few know the details of the complete adventure.

The telling of this tale relies upon the visualization prowess of the modern reader to examine the human condition. This tale has something more than mere adventure to hold the reader’s attention. Great events propel the action. Men commit murder, steal, embark on paths of war, and whisper deceits. A woman acts both selflessly for love and sacrifices everything for it.

Through language and dialogue, violence is revealed as monstrous and that love may be too. The voices of women articulate great sentiments and truths. Memory and loyalty are exposed as weak foundations for trust. At the beginning and then finally, the gods, the Fates and human responsibility all take center stage in Jason and Medea.

A brilliant retelling of this timeless classic about the insatiability of human desire. First-time author Hunter takes the great tragedy of Medea, immortalized by Euripides, and presents it within the context of the heroic history of Jason. What results is a grippingly sympathetic narrative of these two famous figures and their often frivolous but always daring actions. From the moment Jason meets Medea, it's clear that he will need her power to win the Fleece and will stop at nothing to attain it. Throughout, Hunter's prose is lyric and probing and the action never flags. Hollywood can't touch the ravishing horror portrayed here. (But should they decide to try, let's hope they consult Hunter first.)

-Kirkus Discoveries

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:12:46 -0400)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4)
0.5
1
1.5
2
2.5
3
3.5
4 1
4.5
5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 126,423,349 books! | Top bar: Always visible