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The Kings and Queens by Kenneth Baker
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The Kings and Queens

by Kenneth Baker

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0510 (1) 16th century (1) 17th century (1) 18th century (1) 1900s (1) 1910s (1) 1920s (1) 1930s (1) 1940s (1) 1950s (1) 1960s (1) 1970s (1) 1980s (1) 1990s (1) 19th century (1) dj (1) Editorial (1) England (1) hardcover (1) hb (1) history (3) humor (2) Kings queens & rulers (1) monarchy (1) UK (1)

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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0500017050, Hardcover)

As a schoolbook figure, Isaac Newton is most often pictured sitting under an apple tree, about to discover the secrets of gravity. In this short biography, James Gleick reveals the life of a man whose contributions to science and math included far more than the laws of motion for which he is generally famous. Gleick's always-accessible style is hampered somewhat by the need to describe Newton's esoteric thinking processes. After all, the man invented calculus. But readers who stick with the book will discover the amazing story of a scientist obsessively determined to find out how things worked. Working alone, thinking alone, and experimenting alone, Newton often resorted to strange methods, as when he risked his sight to find out how the eye processed images:

.... Newton, experimental philosopher, slid a bodkin into his eye socket between eyeball and bone. He pressed with the tip until he saw 'severall white darke & coloured circles'.... Almost as recklessly, he stared with one eye at the sun, reflected in a looking glass, for as long as he could bear.

From poor beginnings, Newton rose to prominence and wealth, and Gleick uses contemporary accounts and notebooks to track the genius's arc, much as Newton tracked the paths of comets. Without a single padded sentence or useless fact, Gleick portrays a complicated man whose inspirations required no falling apples. --Therese Littleton

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:06:28 -0400)

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