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Endless Universe: Beyond the Big Bang by…
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Endless Universe: Beyond the Big Bang

by Paul J. Steinhardt

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Showing 5 of 5
Should have read this before reading about VSL. ( )
  Baku-X | Jan 10, 2017 |
I found this an accessible, even-handed book for general audiences about a very compelling competing theory to the standard model of the universe (i.e. inflationary theory, big bang, etc). Although I think the weaknesses of the standard theory are quite glaring, Steinhardt and Turok handle these weaknesses with a great deal of respect. I found myself challenged in areas of the book that discussed what are foundational aspects of cosmology (no matter how many times I read the section on the scale-invariant spectrum, I couldn't figure it out). I do think it was perhaps a little too light in terms of proof. Not that I'm a math mind by any stretch, I still would have liked to have seen some of the underlying math concepts that support the element of the cyclic theory that has the branes coming together. The authors mention the math for this element of the theory is still in developmental stages, but what, if anything, supports it?

I forgot to mention when I first posted it the coolest thing. Last year, scientists on the BICEP experiment at South Pole claimed to have found, definitively (five-sigma), proof of b-modes, which would mean the end to Steinhardt and Turok's dream of a cyclic universe. The world of science was abuzz--this was an intensely important moment. However, at the time, Steinhardt counseled caution (http://www.nature.com/news/big-bang-blunder-bursts-the-multiverse-bubble-1.15346), that the findings could be misleading, perhaps clouded by cosmic dust. And, in fact, nearly a year later, this seems to be exactly what happened down there: http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/news/2015/feb/03/galactic-dust-sounds-death-...

The BICEP scientists have pulled way back from their announcement of proof of b-modes in the CMB, and therefore the cyclic model is still on the table. I cheered. ( )
  bookofmoons | Sep 1, 2016 |
Should have read this before reading about VSL. ( )
  BakuDreamer | Sep 7, 2013 |
Overall an interesting read. Many parts of the book are quite technical, and way more than I could grasp. But it was interesting to see their theory, the cyclic model, against the current favored theory, the inflationary model. They basically contend that the 'big bang' was not the beginning, but one in a series of bangs our universe has and will experience. But it's considerably more complicated than that. ( )
  LadyofWinterfell | Jun 25, 2009 |
A simplified but horse's-mouth account of cyclic cosmology, née ekpyrotic cosmology, recently proposed as an alternative model to inflation cosmology. Our universe, supposedly, is a "braneworld" (a term arising from M theory, a generalized form of string theory), normally separated from a second braneworld by some distance along a fourth spatial dimension. Every trillion years or so, when the two braneworlds have been virtually emptied of matter and radiation by the accelerating-expansion effect of dark energy, they collide and bounce. The collision constitutes a Big Bang for our universe, everywhere producing new matter and radiation that undergoes initially a simple expansion and eventually an accelerating expansion as the dark energy becomes dominant again. Great stuff, although I wish the authors would (1) eschew using the term "big crunch" for the approach-to-collision along the fourth dimension (no contraction *within* our universe being involved) and (2) be clearer about the possibility (or necessity?) that our universe is spatially infinite.
1 vote fpagan | Aug 25, 2007 |
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Book description
La teoria del big bang – la spiegazione finora più accreditata della nascita dell'Universo – continua a lasciare insoluti alcuni enigmi fondamentali ed è stata spesso rivista e integrata per tenere conto delle scoperte avvenute negli ultimi trent'anni. Paul J. Steinhardt e Neil Turok hanno messo a punto un modello alternativo. La loro idea è quella di un Universo ciclico: il big bang non è il momento germinale nella storia del cosmo, ma un evento periodico, coincidente con la collisione titanica tra il nostro universo e un mondo parallelo. Universo senza fine presenta un resoconto accessibile e avvincente della ricerca fisica, da dietro le quinte, offrendo una visione del tutto inedita del nostro universo e parendo prospettive di studio clamorose sul passato e sul futuro del cosmo.
(piopas)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0385509642, Hardcover)

Two world-renowned scientists present an audacious new vision of the cosmos that “steals the thunder from the Big Bang theory.” —Wall Street Journal

The Big Bang theory—widely regarded as the leading explanation for the origin of the universe—posits that space and time sprang into being about 14 billion years ago in a hot, expanding fireball of nearly infinite density. Over the last three decades the theory has been repeatedly revised to address such issues as how galaxies and stars first formed and why the expansion of the universe is speeding up today. Furthermore, an explanation has yet to be found for what caused the Big Bang in the first place.

In Endless Universe, Paul J. Steinhardt and Neil Turok, both distinguished theoretical physicists, present a bold new cosmology. Steinhardt and Turok “contend that what we think of as the moment of creation was simply part of an infinite cycle of titanic collisions between our universe and a parallel world” (Discover). They recount the remarkable developments in astronomy, particle physics, and superstring theory that form the basis for their groundbreaking “Cyclic Universe” theory. According to this theory, the Big Bang was not the beginning of time but the bridge to a past filled with endlessly repeating cycles of evolution, each accompanied by the creation of new matter and the formation of new galaxies, stars, and planets.

Endless Universe provides answers to longstanding problems with the Big Bang model, while offering a provocative new view of both the past and the future of the cosmos.  It is a “theory that could solve the cosmic mystery” (USA Today).

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 17:58:13 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

The Big Bang theory--the leading explanation for the origin of the universe--posits that space and time sprang into being about 14 billion years ago in a hot, expanding fireball of nearly infinite density. Over the last three decades, the theory has repeatedly had to be revised to address such issues as how galaxies and stars first formed and why the expansion of the universe is speeding up--let alone what caused the Big Bang in the first place. This book presents a bold new cosmology: Steinhardt and Turok recount remarkable developments in astronomy, particle physics, and superstring theory that together form the basis of their groundbreaking "Cyclic Universe" theory. According to this picture, the Big Bang was not the beginning of time, but the bridge to a past filled with endlessly repeating cycles, each accompanied by the creation of new matter and the formation of new galaxies, stars, and planets.--From publisher description.… (more)

» see all 2 descriptions

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