HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Preguntale a Platon (Spanish Edition) by…
Loading...

Preguntale a Platon (Spanish Edition) (original 1999; edition 2004)

by PH.D. PhD PhD Marinoff Lou (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations
1663124,002 (3.79)None
Professor Lou Marinoff's first book drew on the wisdom of the great philosophers to solve our everyday problems, launching a movement that restored philosophy to what it once was- useful in all walks of life. Now, in The Big Questions, he takes the concept to the next level, applying centuries of philosophy and great literature to help answer central questions of modern existence. Urging us not to accept victimhood as the by-product of modern life, Professor Marinoff uses specific case studies from his counselling practice to show how wisdom from the great thinkers can help us define our own philosophy, and thereby reclaim our sense of well-being. He asks questions that go to the heart of the human condition- How do we know what is right? What is love? How can we cope with change? Why can't we all get along? And, most centrally, how can we use the centuries of wisdom that have come before us to help us answer these questions and feel at ease in the world?… (more)
Member:GRARDO
Title:Preguntale a Platon (Spanish Edition)
Authors:PH.D. PhD PhD Marinoff Lou (Author)
Info:Ediciones B (2004), Edition: 1st.
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Big Questions: How Philosophy Can Change Your Life by Lou Marinoff (1999)

None.

None
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

English (2)  Spanish (1)  All languages (3)
Showing 2 of 2
As a person who has suffered with acute anxiety for a long time, I know what it's like to want to have a quick-fix solution. When I was younger, I thought psychology was the only way to look inward. I have been through many different psychologists, and none have really given me the insight into life's questions. I am twenty-four years old; about a year ago, I found out how philosophy could change my life when I met my boyfriend, a practicing Buddhist. He helped me understand that I had to do the work myself, even if I was going to be aided by medication (Philosophy is amazing for spiritual growth. But medicine is something that has definitely helped my journey. I experimented off and on the medication, and realized that illogical thoughts and feelings could not be helped with only one method.)

Lou Marinoff's book reinforces the mantras of loving the self and others as family. He reinforces the importance of delving into the self, and only becoming attached to things in a positive way. He says get rid of expectations, find peace within each moment, and learn what works best for you, to be happy, as a human being. Most importantly, remember that everyone else is an individual human being too.

It's interesting how hard these things are to do. They take practice. I find myself messing up every day. But I do think they are something to aspire to.

Like every philosopher, there are some things in the book I disagree with. I disagree with his view on gender relationships and I think his approach at disengaging with technology is outdated. However, the overall points he is trying to make in those sections, I agree with. I agree that we should try to establish a relationship with nature, separate from technology- and that the world is much better as a holistic place.

I would suggest this book to anyone who is trying to discover their own personal philosophy. It takes hard work, and doesn't happen overnight.

It's an adventure. ( )
  SweetbriarPoet | Apr 12, 2012 |
As the man says; "To those who dare to question - and especially who dare to question a philosopher. Or as he said elsewhere; Plato, Not Prosac!
  donkeeohtee | Dec 27, 2008 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To those who dare to question—and especially who dare to question a philosopher
First words
What big questions did you ask or will you ask today?
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Professor Lou Marinoff's first book drew on the wisdom of the great philosophers to solve our everyday problems, launching a movement that restored philosophy to what it once was- useful in all walks of life. Now, in The Big Questions, he takes the concept to the next level, applying centuries of philosophy and great literature to help answer central questions of modern existence. Urging us not to accept victimhood as the by-product of modern life, Professor Marinoff uses specific case studies from his counselling practice to show how wisdom from the great thinkers can help us define our own philosophy, and thereby reclaim our sense of well-being. He asks questions that go to the heart of the human condition- How do we know what is right? What is love? How can we cope with change? Why can't we all get along? And, most centrally, how can we use the centuries of wisdom that have come before us to help us answer these questions and feel at ease in the world?

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.79)
0.5
1 1
1.5
2 2
2.5
3 2
3.5 1
4 10
4.5
5 5

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 155,523,134 books! | Top bar: Always visible