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The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged…
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The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged Thirteen and Three Quarters (original 1982; edition 1983)

by Sue Townsend

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2,389402,612 (3.85)68
Member:milesawaygirl
Title:The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole Aged Thirteen and Three Quarters
Authors:Sue Townsend
Info:Methuen (1983), Paperback, 172 pages
Collections:Your library
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Tags:fiction

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The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole, Aged 13 3/4 by Sue Townsend (1982)

1980s (12) 20th century (14) adolescence (17) Adrian Mole (21) British (47) British literature (13) children (11) children's (30) children's literature (11) comedy (23) coming of age (24) diary (81) England (24) English (15) English literature (13) fiction (308) funny (16) humor (209) novel (31) paperback (8) read (42) Roman (12) series (12) teen (17) teenage (9) teenagers (12) to-read (23) YA (36) young adult (51) young adult fiction (10)
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Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
A re-read from my youth in honour of the author's recent death. Adrian is fact was in the same school year as me and during this book starts his O level courses when I did. The humour is timeless, though some of the social attitudes are different and it is interesting to see what has changed over the past thirty years (the book covers January 1981 to the beginning of the Falklands War in April 1982). Great stuff and I will download the sequel Growing Pains which I also read at the time, though I never bothered with any of the several later sequels. ( )
  john257hopper | Apr 17, 2014 |
I've read this twice now. That's not to say that it's such a wonderful book that it bears re-reading, but it's amusing enough and is relatively light fare. It's also easy to forget most of the details, because it's written in a straightforward diary format. The storylines aren't complicated or particularly enthralling, nor are they meant to be. There's a lot of humor, a bit of heart, and cultural reference aplenty for those who recall the early 1980s. It doubtless has even more resonance for those in the UK. As often happens with these things, as an American I don't get most of the musical and personality references, so I'm missing quite a few amusing or nostalgic comments. But the major incidents are easy enough to spot: Thatcherism, mass unemployment, Charles and Di, the conflict over the Falkland Islands. And I always like having reasons to learn about things like Blue Peter and Lucozade.

I'd forgotten how naive and obtuse Adrian Mole can be, but that's part of the fun. The reader is always a step ahead of him, and his astonished declarations are all the funnier because of it. The people around him are all rather average, if eccentric, which helps give the book more universality than something populated by outlandish characters. Their faults, as well as Adrian's, are all very familiar and can easily draw a smile. That's why I took a detour from some of the more somber fiction I usually read, and it's a relief to take a spell from dystopian drama and savage journeys of the soul. Adrian's problems can often be solved by getting the attention of the girl he's keen on or having his grandmother confront a schoolyard bully. Some things should be as easy as that. ( )
  phredfrancis | Feb 8, 2014 |
I first read this book when I stole it form my older cousin at 9.

I only understood like 10% but I still thought it was great. 16 (SIXTEEN!) years later, I still think this is pretty awesome and completely worth it of a read. ( )
  joanasimao | Sep 28, 2013 |
They made me read this when I was at school. I'll never forgive them. ( )
  SpaceyAcey | Sep 23, 2013 |
Adrian has declared himself to be a misunderstood intellectual who has fallen in love with his classmate, Pandora. He is pretentious and irritable and a bit slow on the uptake - in other words, a pretty typical teenager. I found much of this book quite funny, but mostly because I was reading from an adult's point of view. I have no idea how many of the jokes I would have understood had I been reading this at Adrian's age (which is generally the audience to which the book is marketed). I also don't see many adolescents reading this because it's so very dated: for example, there are several references to Margaret Thatcher and a big party to celebrate the marriage of Charles and Diana. That said, I could see it appealing to us adults familiar with British culture from that time period. I don't know that I'll seek out any other Adrian Mole books in the future, but this was a quick and amusing read. ( )
  melydia | Aug 14, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 36 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (28 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Sue Townsendprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Barnes, NicholasNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Damave, HenriëtteIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vriesendorp, HuberteTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
'Paul walked with something screwed up tight inside him ... yet he chatted away with his mother. He would never have confessed to her how he suffered over these things and she only partly guessed.' D. H. Lawrence Sons and Lovers
Dedication
For Colin and also for Sean, Dan, Vicki and Elizabeth with love and thanks
First words
These are my New Year's resolutions:

1. I will help the blind across the road.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0060533994, Paperback)

Teen angst has never been such serious business--or this much fun! In his secret diary, British teen Adrian Mole excruciatingly details every morsel of his turbulent adolescence. Mixed in with daily reports about the zit sprouting on his chin are heartrending passages about his parents' chaotic marriage. Adrian sees all, and he has something to say about everything. Delightfully self-centered, Adrian is the sort of teen who could rule a much better world--if only his crazy relatives and classmates would get out of his way. The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole is a riot, and--although written more than 15 years ago--there is something deliciously timeless about Adrian's angst.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:17:48 -0400)

(see all 6 descriptions)

Follows the ups and downs of one British teenager's life in diary form.

(summary from another edition)

» see all 9 descriptions

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