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The Memory of Earth (Homecoming) by Orson…
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The Memory of Earth (Homecoming) (original 1992; edition 1993)

by Orson Scott Card (Author)

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2,293172,776 (3.45)20
Member:mfagan
Title:The Memory of Earth (Homecoming)
Authors:Orson Scott Card (Author)
Info:Tor Science Fiction (1993), Edition: 1st, 332 pages
Collections:Read but unowned
Rating:***
Tags:None

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The Memory of Earth by Orson Scott Card (1992)

  1. 00
    Dragonflight by Anne McCaffrey (gtfernandezm)
    gtfernandezm: Lost World setting in which simplicity has been used to avoid the past failings of humanity. Similar use of sci-fi tools, similar characterization, straightforward yet not overly simple.
  2. 00
    Off Armageddon Reef by David Weber (infiniteletters)
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Suddenly Katie, who only a few days earlier declared, "I don't want David to be David anymore," has a whole new husband. Instead of snarling and griping, he asks the kids about their schoolwork, manages to enjoy a night at the theater without sneering and tells Katie that he wants to reintroduce "communication" and "intensity" to their sex life. (She's not pleased, feeling that their old "button-pushing routine" at least "had the virtue of efficiency.") He also gives all the money in her wallet to a homeless man, donates Tom's computer to a battered women's shelter, invites GoodNews to move in and, with his new spiritual mentor, launches a campaign to persuade everyone in the neighborhood to shelter homeless youths in their spare bedrooms.

From this point on in "How to Be Good," Hornby could have opted for a simple farce: Suffering the consequences of getting what she wished for, Katie finds herself saddled with an impractical, sanctimonious do-gooder spouse. Roped into playing the naysaying role David has abandoned, she can only look on as the well-meaning but daft projects of David and GoodNews end in debacles while she waits for her husband to come back to his senses.




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How to Be Good

By Nick Hornby

Riverhead
306 pages
Fiction

Buy it





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Print story


E-mail story



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Hornby doesn't take the easy route though, which is something that distinguishes his deceptively light fiction from the usual contemporary comedy of manners. It turns out that David's schemes don't all blow up in his face. Yes, one of the homeless kids rips off his hosts, as Katie predicted, and another gets restless after a couple of weeks and disappears. But a handful of them fuse into unconventional but happy families with the people who take them in. Tom and Molly get mad when David gives away their stuff, but they get over it. Katie is left to sputter about how her husband's newfound charity will never work, when the truth is that it does, if imperfectly so.

For Katie, who has always considered herself a "good person" ("One of the reasons I wanted to become a doctor was that I thought it would be a good -- as in Good, rather than exciting or well-paid or glamorous -- thing to do," she says), this amounts to a moral revolution. She's forced to scrutinize her own generosity, her patience, even her love for her children, and to her dismay she comes up lacking over and over again. "How to Be Good" is partly a wry marital comedy about how a spouse's change of heart invariably destabilizes his longtime partner's own identity, but it's also a thorny parable about the dangers of complacent, conventional self-satisfaction. It's also a very funny and shrewd novel, like Hornby's others, full of acerbic observations about book-buying habits, the virtues of friends who don't really listen to what you say, the tactlessness of children, movies that all seem to "involve spacecraft or insects or noise" and the poisonous bitchiness of those dissatisfied souls who hover in the margins of the creative life. But unlike Hornby's previous protagonists, lost boys who need only master the relatively simple task of making a commitment, Katie faces a predicament that doesn't lend itself to commonplace solutions. The truth is, few of us really are "good people" if we're even a tiny bit rigorous about defining that term. Sometimes the most that we, like Katie, can hope for is to be just about good enough
  bostonwendym | Mar 3, 2016 |
Looking back, these books were really creepy. ( )
  wealhtheowwylfing | Feb 29, 2016 |
Interesting. I was just reading and enjoying the story when all of a sudden it turned into the story of Lehi and his sons. Well, it was different, but it was the same story! It kind of weirded me out a little. I plan on reading the rest of the series. It will be interesting to see if the whole story follows the Book of Mormon theme. ( )
  CharityBradford | Apr 1, 2014 |
Interesting. I was just reading and enjoying the story when all of a sudden it turned into the story of Lehi and his sons. Well, it was different, but it was the same story! It kind of weirded me out a little. I plan on reading the rest of the series. It will be interesting to see if the whole story follows the Book of Mormon theme. ( )
  CharityBradford | Apr 1, 2014 |
Somehow, I don't remember this having such religious overtones the last time I read it.
Nafai is the youngest son of the Wetchik, living in Basilica on the planet Harmony. Unfortunately, Harmony is not as harmonious as it once was and plots have been put in motion that will bring about its destruction. Nafai and his family must brave great danger to serve the Oversoul who/which is charged with keeping the planet safe.
This is the first book in the Homecoming Earth series, and as such is mostly setup for later books. It explains the nature of the Oversoul and introduces the characters. By the time it got really interesting, it was almost over. However, it does keep the reader plugging along; not so boring and expositional that you want to quit and read something else. ( )
  EmScape | Oct 15, 2013 |
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» Add other authors (8 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Orson Scott Cardprimary authorall editionscalculated
Parkinson, KeithCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Salwowski, MarkCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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To a good reader, a good friend,
and, most important, a good man,
Jeff Alton
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The master computer of the planet Harmony was afraid.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812532597, Mass Market Paperback)

High above the planet Harmony, the Oversoul watches. Its task, programmed so many millennia ago, is to guard the human settlement on this planet--to protect this fragile remnant of Earth from all threats. To protect them, most of all, from themselves.

The Oversoul has done its job well. There is no war on Harmony. There are no weapons of mass destruction. There is no technology that could lead to weapons of war. By control of the data banks, and subtle interference in the very thoughts of the people, the artificial intelligence has fulfilled its mission.

But now there is a problem. In orbit, the Oversoul realizes that it has lost access to some of its memory banks, and some of its power systems are failing. And on the planet, men are beginning to think about power, wealth, and conquest.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:16:32 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

"High above the planet Harmony, the Oversoul watches. Its task, programmed so many millennia ago, is to guard the human settlement on this planet -- to protect this fragile remnant of Earth from all threats. To protect them, most of all, from themselves. The Oversoul has done its job well. There is no war on Harmony. There are no weapons of mass destruction. There is no technology that could lead to weapons of war. By control of the data banks, and subtle interference in the very thoughts of the people, the artificial intelligence has fulfilled its mission. But now there is a problem. In orbit, the Oversoul realizes that it has lost access to some of its memory banks, and some of its power systems are failing. And on the planet, men are beginning to think about power, wealth, and conquest."… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 5 descriptions

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