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2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke
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2001: A Space Odyssey (original 1968; edition 1982)

by Arthur C. Clarke

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8,400122368 (3.98)306
Member:Buffy-Tinkes
Title:2001: A Space Odyssey
Authors:Arthur C. Clarke
Info:Roc (1982), Mass Market Paperback
Collections:Read
Rating:***
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2001: A Space Odyssey by Arthur C. Clarke (1968)

  1. 191
    2010: Odyssey Two by Arthur C. Clarke (ksk21, philAbrams)
  2. 90
    Rendezvous With Rama by Arthur C. Clarke (riodecelis, artturnerjr)
  3. 11
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice by D. Pak (philAbrams)
    philAbrams: Seminal breakthrough works
  4. 00
    The Cassiopeia Affair by Chloe Zerwick (MinaKelly)
  5. 00
    Shield by Poul Anderson (MinaKelly)
  6. 00
    The Memory of Whiteness by Kim Stanley Robinson (Valashain)
    Valashain: Robinson's work shows the same kind of optimism in the future that Clarke seems to have. The style and subject of The Memory of Whiteness reminded me of Clarke most but this goes for other works by Robinson as well.
  7. 55
    I, Robot by Isaac Asimov (benmartin79)
  8. 23
    Titan by Stephen Baxter (jseger9000)
    jseger9000: The stories have many similarities (mainly a manned expedition to Saturn), though Baxter's story is much darker.
  9. 24
    I Have No Mouth And I Must Scream [short story] by Harlan Ellison (artturnerjr)
    artturnerjr: Another 60s SF tale that takes the notion of malevolent AI to nightmarish extremes.
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For those who found the movie a puzzlement, all the answers are here.

From what I understand, the movie came first, with Arthur C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick having collaborated on the script. As is clear from reading the book, whatever the original script contained, Kubrick employed an impressionistic approach in the first and last segments (that with the ape-men and that leading up to the Star Child), so naturally that left the details up to the viewers' imaginations. Each of those segments in the book is spelled out through a number of chapters.

While the book certainly complements the movie, I would also say the movie complements the book. In other words, I'm not sure the book would feel as strong as it does without the movie. For one thing, I found it impossible to read the words of HAL, the scheming computer, without hearing the wonderful voice actor who brought HAL to life in the movie.

Furthermore, I prefer Kubrick's ending, just letting things be. Unfortunately Clarke takes his narrative a couple of paragraphs further and I felt they were a couple of paragraphs too far. ( )
  kvrfan | Apr 25, 2015 |
I was sucked in by the ape men and that had me going for a while. But once the story transitioned to present man (or whatever the author intended the future man to be when he wrote this), I started losing interest. I don't know why but reading about a past time that was envisioned to be a technologically glorious future just falls short.

But things got really interesting and the excitement never ceased. The author did a great job of making me care again and I loved the ending of this book. Even though I know the book was written after and in support of the movie, I'm not sure I want to watch it. I'm much more comfortable in my own imagination and don't need world renowned directors to much it up, thank you very much. ( )
  jimocracy | Apr 18, 2015 |
Holds up well over the years. I just finished listening to the audible audio version and it is quite nice. The story is still interesting and actually I think has as much interest retro- as it did when it was first published in a futuristic anticipation story (prospective). It is not identical to the movie, and has its own gravitas independent of the movie. Both are interesting for their own reasons. I would recommend it to sci fi and science fans. 4 stars. ( )
  pmfloyd1 | Mar 26, 2015 |
great book. explains further than the famous kubrick flick was willing to. the description of the extraterrestrial machinations (Sentinels) and their capabilities was intruiging and the ending was a wild and epic ride. Some brilliant ideas were presented here for any stargazers out there looking for a gripping scifi read. ( )
  nmg1 | Mar 20, 2015 |
When an enigmatic monolith is found buried on the moon, scientists are amazed to discover that it's at least 3 million years old. Even more amazing, after it's unearthed the artifact releases a powerful signal aimed at Saturn. What sort of alarm has been triggered? To find out, a manned spacecraft, the Discovery, is sent to investigate. Its crew is highly trained--the best--and they are assisted by a self-aware computer, the ultra-capable HAL 9000.... ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Tutter | Feb 23, 2015 |
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To Stanley
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The drought had lasted now for ten million years, and the reign of the terrible lizards had long since ended. Here on the Equator, in the continent which would one day be known as Africa, the battle for existence had reached a new climax of ferocity, and the victor was not yet in sight.
Behind every man now alive stand thirty ghosts, for that is the ratio by which the dead outnumber the living. (Foreword)
Quotations
"I'm not going to do that, Dave."
Look Dave, I can see you're really upset about this. I honestly think you ought to sit down calmly, take a stress pill, and think things over.
Now they were lords of the galaxy, and beyond the reach of time. They could rove at will among the stars, and sink like a subtle mist through the very interstices of space. But despite their godlike powers, they had not wholly forgotten their origin, in a worm slime of a vanished sea.
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Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0451457994, Mass Market Paperback)

When an enigmatic monolith is found buried on the moon, scientists are amazed to discover that it's at least 3 million years old. Even more amazing, after it's unearthed the artifact releases a powerful signal aimed at Saturn. What sort of alarm has been triggered? To find out, a manned spacecraft, the Discovery, is sent to investigate. Its crew is highly trained--the best--and they are assisted by a self-aware computer, the ultra-capable HAL 9000. But HAL's programming has been patterned after the human mind a little too well. He is capable of guilt, neurosis, even murder, and he controls every single one of Discovery's components. The crew must overthrow this digital psychotic if they hope to make their rendezvous with the entities that are responsible not just for the monolith, but maybe even for human civilization.

Clarke wrote this novel while Stanley Kubrick created the film, the two collaborating on both projects. The novel is much more detailed and intimate, and definitely easier to comprehend. Even though history has disproved its "predictions," it's still loaded with exciting and awe-inspiring science fiction. --Brooks Peck

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:17 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

A special new Introduction by the author highlights this reissue of a classic science fiction novel that changed the way people looked at the stars--and themselves. 2001: A Space Odyssey is the classic science fiction novel that changed the way we looked at the stars and ourselves. 2001: A Space Odyssey inspired what is perhaps the greatest science fiction film ever made--brilliantly imagined by the late Stanley Kubrick ... 2001 is finally here.… (more)

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