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Being Perfect by Anna Quindlen
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Being Perfect

by Anna Quindlen

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I wish I had read this when I was younger. Quindlen brings a nice perspective to the search for perfection. I intend to pass this off to my granddaughter, who is also a perfectionist and can benefit from reading it. ( )
  phantomswife | Jul 6, 2018 |
I happened to grab this off the library shelf this afternoon, and decided to read a few pages before bed to see if it was a book I wanted to continue. It ended up being a very fast read, and a nice little boost with which to end the day. There were a number of nuggets in this book to think about when it comes to striving for perfection vs. taking chances and living life fully. ( )
  dukefan86 | May 29, 2013 |
My Rating: 2 stars
Brief Summary: This 48-page book (half of which are photos!) is an essay on why we should all give up the burden of perfectionism.
Brief Thoughts (But Really A Rant): I can't even begin to tell you how annoyed I am that this "book" is being sold for $12.95 ($17.95 in Canada). And this isn't even Quindlen's first offense of this nature!!! She did the same thing with A Short Guide to A Happy Life (with the emphasis being on "short"). There is nothing in here you can't find somewhere else for considerably less money or for free. I literally read the entire book while eating lunch! I used to like Quindlen, but think her writing has gone steadily downhill. (I thought her novel Rise and Shine was horrible. But at least you got over 200 pages!) This feels like a popular author doing a money grab, and I, for one, am annoyed by it. ( )
1 vote Jenners26 | Jul 2, 2010 |
Anna Quindlen is one of my favorite authors and strikes me as a person with an uncommonly nicely-balanced core of humor, wisdom, compassion and integrity. This is a slim little volume which strikes me as a college graduation speech, about following your own voice instead of those who would demand perfection (their own version, natch). Not a major work, but a nice thought expressed in Quindlen's unique voice. ( )
  burnit99 | May 19, 2010 |
I love Anna Quindlen short inpiational books. This has a great inspiring message drawing from her childhood and into womanhood. A great book for any young woman or man to garner so inspiration. It's very short book and a quick read so you have nothing to loose. ( )
  realbigcat | Nov 6, 2009 |
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375505490, Hardcover)

A few times in your life, someone will tell you something so right, so deeply true that it changes you forever. That is what Anna Quindlen, author of the timeless bestseller A Short Guide to a Happy Life, does here.

In Being Perfect, she shares wisdom that, perhaps without knowing it, you have longed to hear: about “the perfection trap,” the price you pay when you become ensnared in it, and the key to setting yourself free. Quindlen believes that when your success looks good to the world but doesn’t feel good in your heart, it isn’t success at all.

She asks you to set aside your friends’ advice, what your family and co-workers demand, and what society expects, and look at the choices you make every day. When you ask yourself why you are making them, Quindlen encourages you to give this answer: For me. “Because they are what I want, or wish for. Because they reflect who and what I am. . . . That way lies dancing to the melodies spun out by your own heart.”

At the core of this beautiful book lies the secret of authentic success, the inspiration to embrace your own uniqueness and live the life that is undeniably your own, rich in fulfillment and meaning.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:52 -0400)

An essay in which Anna Quindlen discusses the trap of being perfect and urges people to lay down the burden of trying to achieve perfection and find their authentic selves.

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