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A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories…
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A Good Man Is Hard to Find and Other Stories (1955)

by Flannery O'Connor

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
3,221742,816 (4.16)215
Flannery O'Connor's vision of life is expressed through grotesque, often comic situations in which the principal character faces a problem of salvation: the grandmother, in the title story, confronting the murderous Misfit; a neglected four-year-old boy looking for the Kingdom of Christ in the fast-flowing waters of the river; General Sash, about to meet the final enemy.… (more)
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» See also 215 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 73 (next | show all)
The writing is good and I just loved the first story but after that I was a bit bored. My mind wandered constantly. I was a bit disappointed but there is no accounting for personal taste. I'm willing to try something else by the author based on her reputation but I wonder if I'm just not the right reader. ( )
  Iudita | Dec 28, 2019 |
Halfway through I was unimpressed, not because there weren’t standout, amazing stories, characters, and turns of phrase, but because it’s not a consistent collection. By the end, I was overwhelmed and awed. ( )
  nicholasjjordan | Nov 13, 2019 |
Hailed as “One of the Greatest Short Story Collections of All Time.” Flannery O’Connor looked like a mild-mannered librarian in her cat-eye glasses, but she writes like a cross between William Faulkner and Stephen King.
  mcmlsbookbutler | Aug 22, 2019 |
Another amazing collection from Flannery O'Connor. I like to read a couple of Flannery's stories here and there, once in a while, because she doesn't have enough writing available! I like to savor her writing. But also these are cynical and dark. Best not to take them in all at once. Did Flannery avoid people altogether? Possibly. But her sentences are sometimes stunning. A lot of great writing about the sun and moon. It's almost like she was trying to beat her best sentence about the sun or moon in each of these stories. Maybe she should have went with nature writing, but she knew humans a little too well not to write about them. Some stories I thought could use a little more detail to make them sparkle. I especially liked 'A Late Encounter with the Enemy'. If you like this collection, try T. C. Boyle's 'After the Plague'. ( )
  booklove2 | Aug 15, 2019 |
It was fine really, I just am not very good at short stories. DNF
  kemilyh1988 | Apr 12, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 73 (next | show all)
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Epigraph
Dedication
For Sally and Robert Fitzgerald
First words
The grandmother didn't want to go to Florida.
Quotations
She would have been a good woman if it had been somebody there to shoot her every minute of her life.
...an end that would be welcome because it would be the end.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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This is the book that established Flannery O'Connor as a master of the short story and one of the most original and provocative writers to emerge from the South. Her apocalyptic vision of life is expressed through grotesque, often comic, situations in which the principal character faces a problem of salvation: the grandmother, in the title story, confronting the murderous Misfit; a neglected four-year-old boy looking for the Kingdom of Christ in the fast-flowing waters of the river; General Sash, about to meet the final enemy.
"The Displaced Person," the story of an outsider who destroys the balance of life between blacks and whites on a small Southern farm, has been adapted into a powerful drama for television.
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