HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

SCUM Manifesto by Valerie Solanas
Loading...

SCUM Manifesto (original 1971; edition 1996)

by Valerie Solanas

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
5041120,201 (3.57)6
Member:othersam
Title:SCUM Manifesto
Authors:Valerie Solanas
Info:AK Press (1996), Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

SCUM Manifesto by Valerie Solanas (1971)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 6 mentions

English (10)  Dutch (1)  All (11)
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
“SCUM Manifesto” is a fascinating and well-written manifesto that I believe all people would find entertaining. While extremely disturbing, for it discusses eliminating the entire male sex in order to better society, it is definitely an interesting read. We can see the complex and deep intricacies of Valerie Solanas’ mind. This radical feminist text is continuously shocking, even if written in the 1960s. Whether you agree or disagree, empathize with the author or become incredibly infuriated, it is a worthwhile read. While the content is problematic in its hatred towards men and reinforcement of a rigid gender binary, it portrays an fascinating moment of feminist history. -Nicole S.
  muwomenscenter | May 31, 2013 |
i wanted to give this piece 1 star because you can pull some good ideas and concepts out of her ranting, but i couldn't equate it with the other books that i've given even 1 star on this list. and i'm not cool with something so motivated by hatred, so i can live with the .5 star rating for this one. (was she for real, or could this have been a swiftian satire? i have trouble believing that she's for real, but evidence from her life suggests she is, so...)

i refuse to accept or believe that all men are inherently bad, especially as bad as solaras portrays them, and that there's no chance of redemption. i understand her point, but i just don't believe that is true. maybe she'd say that i'm not a radical enough feminist (i think she'd use much cruder and offensive language to call me out) and maybe she'd be right, but i won't believe that the base humanity that can exist in people has been completely lost from the male gender. and i also won't accept her call to violence; i do not believe that is a constructive analysis of our society. i'm not a fan of such vitriol, whose only conclusion is gen(der)ocide.

that said:

"There's no reason why a society consisting of rational beings capable of empathizing with each other, complete and having no natural reason to compete, should have a government, laws, or leaders."

"No genuine social revolution can be accomplished by the male, as the male on top wants the status quo, and all the male on the bottom wants is to be the male on top. The male 'rebel' is a farce; this is the male's 'society,' made by him to satisfy his needs." ( )
  elisa.saphier | Apr 2, 2013 |
As a rant, it's an excellent one and very funny in parts.

I had issues with the ableism of it, and I'm not sure what to do with the anti-gay slurs. Which seem ... not to be slurs to Solanas? Which doesn't give her the right to use them.

Read as a parody of the typical women-hating rant found in an awful lot of books by Manly Man, it's brilliance. Read literally, it's horrifying in parts and very, very clever in others.

For a 60-page work, it's generating more thought than anything else I've read this year. ( )
  JetSilver | Mar 31, 2013 |
intense. ( )
  velvetink | Mar 31, 2013 |
SCUM is short for “Society for Cutting Up Men”, and the manifesto is Valerie Solanas’ infamous text about why the destruction of the male sex is necessary, and her visions about a society free of men. A Stockholm theatre has done a staged version of the manifesto, more or less just presenting the text as it is, causing huge controversy. Public anti-feminist voices have been overbidding each other in condemning the performance, and the actress (but not the male director, go figure) has received numerous death threats, forcing her to play several shows under police protection. A few weeks ago I went to see the performance, and it was really good. This prompted me to pick up the text itself, which I got for Christmas last year from my brother, and has been lingering on my shelf for a year.

There’s no doubt Solanas text is very strong medicine indeed. The male is presented as a genetic defect, incapable of any feelings and genuine relations to other, which has created a highly destructive society only to mask this fact.

It’s very much a shame that Solanas actually shot Andy Warhol – this act makes it hard to overlook the possibility to read her agenda literally. Otherwise this whole work can just as easily read as a sharp metaphor. But really, you need to have an extremely low degree of self-distance in order to be as offended by this as many white hetero men have been. Instead, if you dare to actually look past the verbal slugging and extreme positioning of Solanas, deranged at times, there are some genuine points made. There is stuff here for a western man to actually ponder. And then, reading this text actually becomes a rather liberating experience. Also, Solanas is funny as hell at times.

Absolutely not for everyone, but if you can stand getting slapped around a bit (or well, maybe more than a bit), this is a manifesto well worth reading. ( )
4 vote GingerbreadMan | Nov 28, 2012 |
Showing 1-5 of 10 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0948984031, Paperback)

The focus of this edition is on Avital Ronell’s incisive introduction.

SCUM Manifesto was considered one of the most outrageous, violent and certifiably crazy tracts when it first appeared in 1968. Valerie Solanas, the woman who shot Andy Warhol, self-published this work just before her rampage against the king of Pop Art made her a household name and resulted in her confinement to a mental institution. But the Manifesto, for all its vitriol, is impossible to dismiss as just the rantings of a lesbian lunatic. In fact, the work has indisputable prescience, not only as a radical feminist analysis light-years ahead of its timepredicting artificial insemination, ATMs, a feminist uprising against under-representation in the artsbut also as a stunning testament to the rage of an abused and destitute woman.

The focus of this edition is not on the nostalgic appeal of the work, but on Avital Ronell's incisive introduction, "Deviant Payback: The Aims of Valerie Solanas." Here is a reconsideration of Solanas's infamous text in light of her social milieu, Derrida's "The Ends of Man" (written in the same year), Judith Butler's Excitable Speech, Nietzsche's Ubermensch and notorious feminist icons from Medusa, Medea and Antigone, to Lizzie Borden, Lorenna Bobbit and Aileen Wournos, illuminating the evocative exuberance of Solanas's dark tract.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:45 -0400)

"SCUM Manifesto was considered one of the most outrageous, violent, and certifiably crazy tracts when it first appeared in 1968. Valerie Solanas, the woman who shot Andy Warhol, self-published this work just before her rampage against the king of Pop Art made her a household name and resulted in her confinement to a mental institution. But the Manifesto, for all its vitriol, is impossible to dismiss as just the rantings of a lesbian lunatic. In fact, the work has prescience, not only as a radical feminist analysis light-years ahead of its time - predicting artificial insemination, ATMs, a feminist uprising against under-representation in the arts - but also as a testament to the rage of an abused and destitute woman." "The focus of this edition, however, is not on the nostalgic appeal of SCUM. Rather, Avital Ronell reconsiders Solanas's infamous text in light of the social milieu in which it was written, and reinterprets its status as a cult classic. Ronell writes, "Maybe the Solanas tract was payback: it was clocked to strike the time of response to all shameless woman-hating manifestos and their counterparts, the universalizers." She conjures Derrida's "The Ends of Man" (written in the same year), Judith Butler's Excitable Speech, Nietzsche's Ubermensch, and notorious feminist icons from Medusa, Medea, and Antigone, to Lizzie Borden, Lorenna Bobbitt, and Aileen Wournos, illuminating the evocative exuberance of Solana's dark tract."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
1 avail.
90 wanted
1 free
1 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.57)
0.5 1
1 5
1.5
2 7
2.5
3 21
3.5 4
4 24
4.5 2
5 19

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 114,355,021 books! | Top bar: Always visible