HomeGroupsTalkMoreZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy
Loading...

Woman on the Edge of Time (original 1976; edition 1985)

by Marge Piercy (Author)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
2,143445,172 (3.92)1 / 143
Hailed as a classic of speculative fiction, Marge Piercy's landmark novel is a transformative vision of two futures--and what it takes to will one or the other into reality. Harrowing and prescient, Woman on the Edge of Time speaks to a new generation on whom these choices weigh more heavily than ever before.   Connie Ramos is a Mexican American woman living on the streets of New York. Once ambitious and proud, she has lost her child, her husband, her dignity--and now they want to take her sanity. After being unjustly committed to a mental institution, Connie is contacted by an envoy from the year 2137, who shows her a time of sexual and racial equality, environmental purity, and unprecedented self-actualization. But Connie also bears witness to another potential outcome: a society of grotesque exploitation in which the barrier between person and commodity has finally been eroded. One will become our world. And Connie herself may strike the decisive blow.   Praise for Woman on the Edge of Time   "This is one of those rare novels that leave us different people at the end than we were at the beginning. Whether you are reading Marge Piercy's great work again or for the first time, it will remind you that we are creating the future with every choice we make."--Gloria Steinem   "An ambitious, unusual novel about the possibilities for moral courage in contemporary society."--The Philadelphia Inquirer   "A stunning, even astonishing novel . . . marvelous and compelling."--Publishers Weekly   "Connie Ramos's world is cuttingly real."--Newsweek   "Absorbing and exciting."--The New York Times Book Review From the Trade Paperback edition.… (more)
Member:equanimity23
Title:Woman on the Edge of Time
Authors:Marge Piercy (Author)
Info:Fawcett (1985), Edition: Reissue, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:to-read, sci-fi, e-reader

Work details

Woman on the Edge of Time by Marge Piercy (1976)

  1. 50
    The Female Man by Joanna Russ (psybre)
    psybre: for similar social- and gender issues explored
  2. 40
    The Gate to Women's Country by Sheri S. Tepper (owen1218)
  3. 10
    Kindred by Octavia E. Butler (souloftherose)
    souloftherose: Both novels use time travel to explore issues of race and inequality
  4. 10
    Herland by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (sturlington)
  5. 00
    Always Coming Home by Ursula K. Le Guin (sturlington)
    sturlington: The feminist utopias seem similar.
Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
Love it. Difficult to read, emotionally, due to grim and terrible reality of disadvantaged protagonist--woman of color unjustly locked into a mental institution.

Mattapoisett is a brilliant utopian gem, eco-feminist, and I see echoes of this vision in a lot of modern SF with utopian threads.

Classic SF notes here:
http://positronchicago.blogspot.com/2015/08/classic-sci-fi-woman-on-edge-of-time... ( )
  jakecasella | Sep 21, 2020 |
Woman unfairly committed to mental hospital contacted by woman from eutopian future
  JohnLavik | Mar 29, 2020 |
I only read this book, and then only partially was to see how the location of this story, or rather the town in the future was a similar town to the one I spent my high school years, namely Mattapoisett, Massachusetts. So, I skipped 7 chapters and landed on chapter 8 where Mattapoisett figures prominently. When she mentioned the Grange, I knew she got it right. When I lived there (1960-64) the population was 3,000, and now it is 6,000. It's a suburb of New Bedford, but off the beaten path. It still has two churches, Congregational and Catholic. And 34 elective offices, including the Herring Weir Inspector. ( )
  vpfluke | Mar 27, 2020 |
I'm adding a shelf for books recommended by the Feminist SciFi blog of books to read this election season.
  roniweb | May 30, 2019 |
Challenging in places, but an interesting read. The central character lives in a world very unfamiliar to me, among the Hispanic American poor, bogged down in violence, addiction, and prostitution, and then trapped in a labyrinth of medical psychiatry which treats people only as examples of confidently misdiagnosed and brutally mistreated mental conditions.

Other reviewers have described this as "dated", but what struck me was the remarkable way in which the themes of feminism, sexual diversity, and gender fluidity chime with the concerns of the present day. I had to look back in the book to check that it was actually written 40 years ago. The sections in which we travel to the (possible) future(s) are a kind of updated version of H. G. Wells's "The Time Machine", with the beautiful and childlike Eloi represented by Luciente's contentedly anarchic and artistic people, and the bestial Morlocks by a world where a woman can be confined to a room for the amusement of others and entertained entirely by a screen, attended by a cyborg/android that can read human emotional states. As with many utopias/dystopias, they represent aspects of today's world extrapolated into caricature. I loved being in Luciente's world, where the constraints of sex, gender, and sexuality are outgrown, but the inevitable conflict of personalities is dealt with in an adult way, accepting the imperfections of human reality.

MB 24-iv-2019 ( )
  MyopicBookworm | Apr 24, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 44 (next | show all)
It is the most serious and fully imagined Utopia since Ursula K. LeGuin's The Dispossessed, and even the cynical reader will leave it refreshed and rallied--as Piercy intended.
 

» Add other authors

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Marge Piercyprimary authorall editionscalculated
Leifhold, ChristianCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mahon, PhyllisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Petersen, Arne HerløvTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Connie got up from her kitchen table and walked slowly to the door.
Quotations
I see the original division of labor, that first dichotomy, as enabling later divvies into haves and have-nots, powerful and powerless, enjoyers and workers, rapists and victims. The patriarchal mind/body split turned the body to machine and the rest of the universe into booty on which the will could run rampant, using, discarding, destroying.
I must serve the talent that uses me, the energy that flows through me, but I mustn't make others serve me.
We are not three women, Connie thought. We are ups and downs and heavy tranks meeting in the all-electric kitchen and bouncing off each other's opaque sides like shiny pills colliding.
I was not born and raised to fight battles, but to be modest and gentle and still. Only one person to love. Just one little corner of loving of my own. For that love I'd have borne it all and I'd never have fought back. I would have obeyed. I would have agreed that I'm sick, that I'm sick to be poor and sick to be sick and sick to be hungry and sick to be lonely and sick to be robbed and used. But you were so greedy, so cruel! One of them, just one, you could have left me! But I have nothing. Why shouldn't I strike back?
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (2)

Hailed as a classic of speculative fiction, Marge Piercy's landmark novel is a transformative vision of two futures--and what it takes to will one or the other into reality. Harrowing and prescient, Woman on the Edge of Time speaks to a new generation on whom these choices weigh more heavily than ever before.   Connie Ramos is a Mexican American woman living on the streets of New York. Once ambitious and proud, she has lost her child, her husband, her dignity--and now they want to take her sanity. After being unjustly committed to a mental institution, Connie is contacted by an envoy from the year 2137, who shows her a time of sexual and racial equality, environmental purity, and unprecedented self-actualization. But Connie also bears witness to another potential outcome: a society of grotesque exploitation in which the barrier between person and commodity has finally been eroded. One will become our world. And Connie herself may strike the decisive blow.   Praise for Woman on the Edge of Time   "This is one of those rare novels that leave us different people at the end than we were at the beginning. Whether you are reading Marge Piercy's great work again or for the first time, it will remind you that we are creating the future with every choice we make."--Gloria Steinem   "An ambitious, unusual novel about the possibilities for moral courage in contemporary society."--The Philadelphia Inquirer   "A stunning, even astonishing novel . . . marvelous and compelling."--Publishers Weekly   "Connie Ramos's world is cuttingly real."--Newsweek   "Absorbing and exciting."--The New York Times Book Review From the Trade Paperback edition.

No library descriptions found.

Book description
Often compared to Margaret Atwood's The Handmaid’s Tale and Naomi Alderman's The Power Woman on the Edge of Time has been hailed as a classic of speculative science fiction. Disturbing and forward thinking, Marge Piercy’s remarkable novel will speak to a new generation of readers.

After being unjustly committed to a mental institution, Connie Ramos is contacted by an envoy from the year 2137, who shows her a utopian future of sexual and racial equality and environmental harmony.

But Connie also bears witness to another potential outcome: a dystopian society of grotesque exploitation. One will become our world. And Connie herself may strike the decisive blow...

The classic feminist science fiction novel – reissued on its 40th anniversary with a new introduction by the author.

Haiku summary

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.92)
0.5 1
1 6
1.5 3
2 15
2.5 6
3 88
3.5 25
4 158
4.5 13
5 128

Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

» Publisher information page

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 150,648,332 books! | Top bar: Always visible