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De literaire kring by Marjolijn Februari
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De literaire kring (2007)

by Marjolijn Februari

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This was a story of a group of powerbrokers - bankers, legal, academics - who lived in a village outside Amsterdam and used the book club as a networking opportunity. The members had business relationships with many powerbrokers throughout the world and were able to use their influence to benefit themselves and to change policy in countries throughout the world. In this particular scenario the members were well aware of how 80 children in a third world country die after ingesting cough medicine which was contaminated. The owner of the business who sold the contaminated product was a well known member of the book club. Mysteriously all evidence linking him to the disaster disappeared and the parents of the children were unable to sue the company. Even though the others members of the book club were aware they did nothing to assist the grief stricken parents. They totally ignored the situation hoping it would just go aware. Things came to a head when the daughter of the disgraced business man wrote a book. This book was not easy to read however I persevered. I wonder how often this scenario actually happens in real life. More often that we think I am sure. ( )
  clarejo | Sep 1, 2011 |
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Men speak to much about the world. Each one of us here, let the world go how it will, and be victorious or not victorious, has he not al Life of his own tot lead? One Life, al little gleam of Time between tot Eternities: no second change for us forevermore! It were well for us to live not as fools and simulacra, but as wise and realities. The world’s being saved will not save us. Nor the world’s being lost destroy us. We should look to ourselves; there is great merit here in “the duty of staying at home”! And on the whole , tot say truth, I never heard of worlds being “saved” in any other way. “
Thomas Carlyle, On Heroes, Hero-worship and the Heroic in History
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De suikerpot viel van tafel.
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Book description
Thirty-year-old Theresa Pellikaan is typical of the wealthy middle classes — with her respectable background, successful husband and house in an apparently sleepy, yet powerful, rich village. She works in a gallery, typical of her type.

Her former schoolmate Ruth Ackermann, who was brought up in the same village, is making waves with an international bestseller. To Theresa's surprise, none of the villagers ever mention her achievement, not even Theresa's father, the famous civil rights scholar Randolf Pellikaan, and his esteemed book club. She begins to wonder why. It can't only be because it's not "literature."

It emerges that there is a dark secret in the village. Every member of the book club has a reason to keep quiet and Ruth Ackermann's novel threatens to bring the past into the present, with devastating results. Unable to cope with the silence, Theresa investigates, no matter the consequences.
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'The Book Club' is a rich, deep and atmospheric story about what happens when you turn a blind eye once too often and how difficult it is to keep even the darkest secret.

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