HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Patrimonium een waar verhaal by Philip Roth
Loading...

Patrimonium een waar verhaal (original 1991; edition 2003)

by Philip Roth

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
6622214,511 (4.02)9
Member:biblion
Title:Patrimonium een waar verhaal
Authors:Philip Roth
Info:Amsterdam Meulenhoff 2003
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

Patrimony: A True Story by Philip Roth (1991)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 9 mentions

English (13)  Dutch (4)  Spanish (3)  German (1)  Italian (1)  All languages (22)
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
Patrimony is about author Philip Roth dealing with his father's debilitating and rapidly growing brain tumor. It takes away his autonomy and eventually his life. Patrimony depicts about a three year period in the late 1980's at the first onset of the tumor, which was originally misdiagnosed as Bell's Palsy, that gave his father, Hermann, partial facial paralysis to splitting headaches and loss of equilibrium.

Patrimony has what I have always called the "Titanic Effect." I'm sure it actually has a proper name but I have never looked for it. The Titanic Effect is that the person is aware of the tragic event but getting there is still so heartbreaking even though you knew it was already going to happened.

I knew Hermann Roth was going to die. I knew how he was going to die. But it is so sad to read about. I felt badly for Philip because it was incredibly difficult to reconcile with the fact that this strong, obstinate, hard working man had become so frail and was not going to live much longer. It must have been hard for Hermann to feel the deterioration of his body; that he couldn't do the same things that he once did. Slowly, his independence was slipping from him.

I felt almost compelled to read this book as rapidly as I did because I'm in a parallel situation with my Grandmother. I'm thinking the way the novelist felt is how my mother must be starting to feel. It's startling to see that someone who was once so strong is now so weak. If my mother was any kind of reader, I would give her this one.

This was my first Roth book. What made me buy it was that when I read the New York Times article announcing his retirement, Patrimony and a brief synopsis was mentioned. It sounded interesting. Patrimony was a very realistic and visceral account of celebrating a life and realizing you'll have to let it go. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
Patrimony is about author Philip Roth dealing with his father's debilitating and rapidly growing brain tumor. It takes away his autonomy and eventually his life. Patrimony depicts about a three year period in the late 1980's at the first onset of the tumor, which was originally misdiagnosed as Bell's Palsy, that gave his father, Hermann, partial facial paralysis to splitting headaches and loss of equilibrium.

Patrimony has what I have always called the "Titanic Effect." I'm sure it actually has a proper name but I have never looked for it. The Titanic Effect is that the person is aware of the tragic event but getting there is still so heartbreaking even though you knew it was already going to happened.

I knew Hermann Roth was going to die. I knew how he was going to die. But it is so sad to read about. I felt badly for Philip because it was incredibly difficult to reconcile with the fact that this strong, obstinate, hard working man had become so frail and was not going to live much longer. It must have been hard for Hermann to feel the deterioration of his body; that he couldn't do the same things that he once did. Slowly, his independence was slipping from him.

I felt almost compelled to read this book as rapidly as I did because I'm in a parallel situation with my Grandmother. I'm thinking the way the novelist felt is how my mother must be starting to feel. It's startling to see that someone who was once so strong is now so weak. If my mother was any kind of reader, I would give her this one.

This was my first Roth book. What made me buy it was that when I read the New York Times article announcing his retirement, Patrimony and a brief synopsis was mentioned. It sounded interesting. Patrimony was a very realistic and visceral account of celebrating a life and realizing you'll have to let it go. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
Patrimony is about author Philip Roth dealing with his father's debilitating and rapidly growing brain tumor. It takes away his autonomy and eventually his life. Patrimony depicts about a three year period in the late 1980's at the first onset of the tumor, which was originally misdiagnosed as Bell's Palsy, that gave his father, Hermann, partial facial paralysis to splitting headaches and loss of equilibrium.

Patrimony has what I have always called the "Titanic Effect." I'm sure it actually has a proper name but I have never looked for it. The Titanic Effect is that the person is aware of the tragic event but getting there is still so heartbreaking even though you knew it was already going to happened.

I knew Hermann Roth was going to die. I knew how he was going to die. But it is so sad to read about. I felt badly for Philip because it was incredibly difficult to reconcile with the fact that this strong, obstinate, hard working man had become so frail and was not going to live much longer. It must have been hard for Hermann to feel the deterioration of his body; that he couldn't do the same things that he once did. Slowly, his independence was slipping from him.

I felt almost compelled to read this book as rapidly as I did because I'm in a parallel situation with my Grandmother. I'm thinking the way the novelist felt is how my mother must be starting to feel. It's startling to see that someone who was once so strong is now so weak. If my mother was any kind of reader, I would give her this one.

This was my first Roth book. What made me buy it was that when I read the New York Times article announcing his retirement, Patrimony and a brief synopsis was mentioned. It sounded interesting. Patrimony was a very realistic and visceral account of celebrating a life and realizing you'll have to let it go. ( )
  Y2Ash | Apr 16, 2014 |
Philip Roth delivers a touching tribute to his father. With eloquence, humor and the utmost respect he shares his father's illness leading up to his final days. Herman Roth wakes up one morning to a strange paralysis, drooping eyelid, slack cheek and slurred speech, on one side of his face. Thinking he has had a stroke Philip takes his father to see a doctor. The news is worse. Herman has a brain tumor at the base of his skull that has been growing for ten years. What follows is a journey of father and son, navigating medical treatments and traversing the rough road of relationships. The result is a touching memoir of discovery for both father and son. If you have never read anything by Roth, read this. ( )
  SeriousGrace | Jun 18, 2013 |
00002917
  cavlibrary | Jun 5, 2013 |
Showing 1-5 of 13 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (11 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Philip Rothprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Hoog, ElseTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Information from the Dutch Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
My father had lost most of the sight in his right eye by the time he'd reached eighty-six, but otherwise he seemed in phenomenal health for a man his age when he came down with what the Florida doctor diagnosed, incorrectly, ad Bell's palsy, a viral infection that causes paralysis, usually temporary, to one side of the face.
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0679752935, Paperback)

With the honesty of a skilled biographer and the sensitivity of a caring son, Roth chronicles the life of his father, Herman, in this gripping work which won a 1991 National Book Critics Circle Award. Roth holds little back in describing his father as a man of rare intensity and fierce independence who, for better or worse, stood by his principles and held others to his own rigorous standards. Writes Roth, "His obsessive stubbornness--his stubborn obsessiveness--had very nearly driven my mother to a breakdown in her final years." Frank throughout, Roth calls his father "a pitiless realist, but I wasn't his offspring for nothing, and I could be pretty realistic, too."

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:56:21 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

This deeply affecting memoir focuses on the time in the author's life when he learned of his father's terminal brain cancer. A remarkable portrait of a father and son, this work confronts death and fear, and, ultimately, extracts the truth of what it means to love and be loved.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
12 avail.
23 wanted
4 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (4.02)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 2
2.5 1
3 20
3.5 10
4 42
4.5 9
5 31

Audible.com

Two editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,247,828 books! | Top bar: Always visible