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Consider The Lobster: Essays and Arguments:…
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Consider The Lobster: Essays and Arguments: And Other Essays (original 2005; edition 2007)

by David Foster Wallace

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2,934581,960 (4.16)101
Member:wildeep
Title:Consider The Lobster: Essays and Arguments: And Other Essays
Authors:David Foster Wallace
Info:Abacus (2007), Edition: New Ed, Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
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Consider the Lobster and Other Essays by David Foster Wallace (2005)

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English (56)  German (1)  Japanese (1)  All languages (58)
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
David Foster Wallace's collection of essays. I enjoyed his description of covering John McCain's run for the 2000 Presidency, especially given McCain's current campaign.

Wallace uses extensive footnotes in his expository writing; the footnotes are almost more entertaining than the main body itself. ( )
  Roamin1 | Aug 28, 2016 |
A treasure as an audiobook read by the late author, this is a small collection of his essays, all of which are on uncomfortable topics. DFW asks such probing and (retrospectively) crucial follow up questions to those of the immediate surface concern that it makes you wonder if you've thought deeply enough about the events of our time. ( )
  albertgoldfain | Jun 24, 2016 |
Author was obviously manipulative, cruel, and in pain. Uncomfortably self-conscious. Inquisitive. Sometimes funny. ( )
  Peter_Scissors | Jun 21, 2016 |
4 stars, even though I didn't read 3 of the essays.

Rating per essay:

Big Red Son: 4*. Funny, informative and full of brilliant writing.

Certainly the End of Something or Other, One Would Sort of Have to Think: 3*. I liked the idea, but I'm not familiar with the works of Updike, Roth and the other guy.

Some Remarks on Kafka's Funniness from Which Probably Not Enough Has Been Removed 4*, close to 5*. It would've been a 5* if I actually read Kafka, which I guess is on me, and not on DFW. Explaining why his generation of college students don't appreciate the real message of Kafka's work is a difficult task, but it is beautifully done, with a haunting conclusion.

Authority and American Usage: Wasn't too interested in the subject, didn't read.

The View from Mrs. Thompson's: 3*. I liked the writing, and it was funny at times, but this article was truly written for Americans, and therefore I kind of felt left out.

How Tracy Austin Broke My Heart: 5*. Really eye-opening to me. Sports-stars clichés might actually be their true way of dealing with trouble, and their stupidity might actually be the brilliance required for greatness...

Up, Simba: I am interested in politics, but this is way back and times have changed. I didn't feel like reading about McCain and the whole campaign, though I have to say that the introduction to this essay was touching.

Consider the Lobster: 4*. This essay would've gotten 5* if DFW would've gotten into the moral stuff a bit earlier on. I do appreciate context, which is what the lengthy description of the Main Lobster Festival was, but I was slightly disappointed that the subject that I read the essay for was so short. However, it was utterly brilliant and so full of humble uncertainty, for which I simply have come to love DFW.

Joseph Frank's Dostoevsky: 5*. Now this is my kind of essay. Fully dedicated to possibly my favorite writer in the world, it made me want to read FMD even more. Definitely worth re-reading.

Host: Didn't read because it's didn't appeal to me, both due to the format and the fact that I couldn't find out what it was about..
  bartt95 | Apr 10, 2016 |
Very funny, wise, I've read it twice. Go for the essay on the Vegas Porn Convention, stay for the wonderful and hilariously funny writing. The "Snoot" grammar article is a MUST! ( )
  evamat72 | Mar 31, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 56 (next | show all)
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Se siete annoiati e disgustati dalla politica e non vi disturbate a votare, di fatto votate per gli arroccati establishment dei due principali partiti, i quali … hanno una consapevolezza profonda di quanto gli convenga mantenervi in una condizione di disgusto e noia e cinismo … Sia chiaro: avete tutto il diritto di stare a casa, se volete, ma non prendetevi in giro pensando di non votare. In realtà, non votare è impossibile: si può votare votando, oppure votare rimanendo a casa e raddoppiando tacitamente il valore del voto di un irriducibile.
Essere turisti di massa, per me, significa diventare puri americani dell'ultimo tipo: alieni, ignoranti, smaniosi di qualcosa che non si potrà mai avere, delusi come non si potrà mai ammettere di essere … Significa imporre la propria presenza in luoghi che sarebbero, in tutti i sensi non-economici, migliori e più veri senza di noi … come turisti, diventiamo economicamente rilevanti ma esistenzialmente deprecabili, insetti su una cosa morta.
[John Powers]: «… la proliferazione di blurb nei trailer cinematografici ha fatto sembrare tutti i critici o degli idioti o degli agenti pubblicitari …»
La domanda sconvolgente … è perché mai dovrebbe essere divertente ascoltare gente che viene portata con l'inganno a offendersi e agitarsi sempre più. Non sembra esserci una risposta valida. A un certo punto bisogna semplicemente chinare la testa e accettare che certi americani si divertono con cose per le quali a qualsiasi persona sana di mente vorrebbe voglia di tagliarsi le vene. Ci sono, dopotutto, adulti statunitensi del tutto efficienti cui piace la televisione evangelica, il canale delle televendite e la musica per ascensori. Si chiama Avventura democratica.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0316013323, Paperback)

Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a funny bone? What is John Updike's deal, anyway? And what happens when adult video starlets meet their fans in person? David Foster Wallace answers these questions and more in essays that are also enthralling narrative adventures. Whether covering the three-ring circus of a vicious presidential race, plunging into the wars between dictionary writers, or confronting the World's Largest Lobster Cooker at the annual Maine Lobster Festival, Wallace projects a quality of thought that is uniquely his and a voice as powerful and distinct as any in American letters.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:19:09 -0400)

For this collection, Wallace immerses himself in the three-ring circus that is the presidential race in order to document one of the most vicious campaigns in recent history. Later he strolls from booth to booth at a lobster festival in Maine and risks life and limb to get to the bottom of the lobster question. Then he wheedles his way into an L.A. radio studio, armed with tubs of chicken, to get the behind-the-scenes view of a conservative talk show featuring a host with an unnatural penchant for clothing that looks good only on the radio. Do lobsters feel pain? Did Franz Kafka have a sick sense of humor? What is John Updike's deal anyway? And who won the Adult Video News' Female Performer of the Year Award the same year Gwyneth Paltrow won her Oscar? Wallace answers these questions and more.--From publisher description."Long renowned as one of the smartest writers on the loose, David Foster Wallace reveals himself in Consider the Lobster to be also one of the funniest. In these pages he ranges far and farther in his search for the original, the curious, or the merely mystifying. His quest takes him into the three-ring circus of a presidential race to ask, among other urgent questions, why it is that the circles journalists walk in while whispering into their cell phones are always counterclockwise. He discovers the World's Largest Lobster Cooker at the Maine Lobster Festival and confronts the inevitable question just beyond the butter-or-cocktail-sauce quandary. He plunges into the wars among dictionary writers, deconstructing once and for all the battles between descriptivists and prescriptivists. And he talks his way into an LA radio studio, bearing buckets of fried chicken, to get an uncensored view of a conservative talk show and its alarmingly attired host."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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