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The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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The Great Gatsby (original 1925; edition 1995)

by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Matthew J. Bruccoli (Foreword)

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48,79681911 (3.88)3 / 967
Member:amandawaltz
Title:The Great Gatsby
Authors:F. Scott Fitzgerald
Other authors:Matthew J. Bruccoli (Foreword)
Info:Scribner (1995), Paperback, 216 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:historical fiction, chapter book, 1920s, Jazz Age, Long Island, New York, wealth, identity, affairs, first loves

Work details

The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald (1925)

  1. 143
    The Sun Also Rises by Ernest Hemingway (themephi, sturlington)
    sturlington: Great novels of the Jazz Age.
  2. 42
    Flappers, Flasks and Foul Play (A Jazz Age Mystery #1) by Ellen Mansoor Collier (TomWaitsTables)
  3. 31
    The Green Hat by Michael Arlen (Rebeki)
    Rebeki: Also narrated by a shadowy "outsider" figure and set in the glamorous 1920s.
  4. 42
    The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell (akblanchard)
    akblanchard: In the afterword of The Other Typist, Suzanne Rindell acknowledges that her work was inspired by The Great Gatsby.
  5. 42
    Death of a Salesman by Arthur Miller (FFortuna)
  6. 10
    The Red and the Black by Stendhal (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Shady social upstarts rising to prominence in societies dealing with fundamental class upheaval and entertaining romantic aspirations outside their traditional spheres.
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  8. 21
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    Trust by Cynthia Ozick (citygirl)
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  16. 22
    An Unfinished Season by Ward Just (elenchus)
    elenchus: Unfinished Season is set in the 1950s in and around Chicago, but elsewise an interesting parallel to The Great Gatsby in terms of setting and basic plot: class and manners among the society elite, and a young man wrestling with changes in family, caste, and personal relations.… (more)
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(see all 24 recommendations)

1920s (1)
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Showing 1-5 of 777 (next | show all)
Having only attended an American high school for 6 months, I didn't get the opportunity to read F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby in school. I've always heard about it - always heard about the story and some of the analysis of things like the green light or the billboard - but it wasn't until the 2013 movie, with Leonardo DiCaprio acting the role of Jay Gatsby, did I seriously consider reading the book.

I think that if I read this book in my teenage years I'd probably not have it listed on any of my top 10 favorite reads, it might have made my “least favorite books” pile. I'm positive I would not have enjoyed analyzing and micro-analyzing the novel. However, having read it as an adult and on my own terms, I can honestly say that I really enjoyed The Great Gatsby.

It's a quick read, the narrative is fluid and I love that Nick Carraway experiences the wonder of Gatsby alongside the reader. The setting is the roaring 20s, the parties are larger than life and Gatsby’s complex life and quest for Daisy’s love is (to me) both admirable and pitiful.

Nick is new to New York and finds himself living next door to the enigmatic Jay Gatsby. Gatsby is known for throw excellent parties, but no one really knows his history or how he came into his money, but there are rumors. On the other side of the sound is Nick’s cousin, Daisy and her husband Tom Buchanan who are also rich, thanks in part to Tom’s family.

Nick discovers that Jay and Daisy shared a connection when they were younger and that Jay’s life was centered around winning Daisy over and he becomes entangled in everyone’s affairs.

I loved the view of New York City that we see throughout the novel. I didn’t quite expect the ending and while I wished that there was another way I think it made a lot of sense - a bitter-sweet tragedy.

If you love the 1920s, then this should be on your to-read list!
( )
  iShanella | Dec 2, 2016 |
The Great Gatsby is the novel that has a romantic, fantastic, and problematic story written by F. Scott Fitzgerald. This novel is the popular novel in America, many of the high school students are required by their teachers to read this novel. This story begins when Gatsby the richer man that live beside Nick is did everything to find his beloved one that is Daisy. Every night, he makes a party in his house, but Daisy never comes. One day, with the help of Nick, Daisy and Gatsby meet each other and from this their old love stories begin. Moreover, when they are build up their old love stories, the secret of Gatsby is open one by one and bring him to the end of his life.

Moreover, the Great Gatsby novel has some strengths and weaknesses. The strength, this novel has title that makes intrigued many people, as a reader I felt intrigued also because I want to know who is Gatsby, is he truly a great man. The title also contains a hidden meaning of this novel that actually interesting and have a good story. Also, this novel has footnotes that help the readers to have a way to understand the novel.

However, this novel has some weaknesses that make the reader difficult. The weaknesses are the Great Gatsby novel has many words that difficult to understand. Also, some of the sentences and the words used a figurative language that may give difficulties to readers. Moreover, at the beginning this novel felt boring because it is only told about Nick’s life. This novel is used a first person (narrator) that is Nick. Using a first person (narrator) make readers confused to understand at first time when they are read.

To conclude, I still considered this novel as the wonderful classical novel even though at the end it is ended with sad ending and the language difficult to understand, but for me it is still a good story that I recommend you to read. This novel has many lessons that related to our life; for example, in our life we should always said a truth especially to our nearest person ,and this novel is illustrates the culture in New York in 1920’ which is feel normal when they are infidelity like Gatsby and Daisy. ( )
  brigitamahieu | Dec 2, 2016 |
Fitzgerald's novel the Great Gatsby is one of the good books that I have read. The story line is really interesting, and quite organized. For me this book is about shallowness. The story has many metaphors and ideas within it. Well the characters in the novel portray the idealism in American society in that era, which are the American Dreams. So, Gatsby is a millionaire, who hosts extravagant parties depicting the image of the roaring twenties era where he idolizes luxury and extravagance to impress his mistress.

The weakness of this book is when the narrative is rather difficult to follow in some chapters in that it jumps from present to past and back with no warning, leaving the reader, wondering just what is happening. The dialogue itself is also weird in a pretty distinctive way. The characters named Gartsby, his weakness is his own mind that could be attributed to his downfall, his love of Daisy, and his pure naivety. He spends a lotof money on lavish parties in the hopes that she will show up.

However, the strength of this book is all of the deep contradictions swimming around its heart. At once a scathing indictment on the erosion of the American Dream, but also a bittersweet love letter to the unfailing optimism of the American people. Mr. Fitzgerald nailed it and wrote one of the greatest American novels.

To conclude, I can say that money can't buy love, and it'll probably ruin your life. All in all, the story is beautiful, and elegantly written. ( )
  susikath | Dec 1, 2016 |
The great Gatsby is truly a book like no other. F Scott Fitzgerald captures the life of a wealthy new Yorker in the mid 1900s. It is not hard to imagine Gatsby, and his life. The language is so perfectly crafted top create a vivid image in your head. I think the true value of books is when the writer allows the reader to have emotions towards the characters and the plot. Fitzgerald does nothing short of that. As a reader I fell that it is genuinely hard to not like Gatsby. The way he hold himself, the fact that he is kind off mysterious, and just his overall character is very likable. Throughout the story Fitzgerald creates controversy in our heads whether or not we want daisy and Gatsby to be together or if we cant stand daisy as a result of her actions. The fact that Fitzgerald is able to allow us to make that decision in our own heads is brilliant. It is great to read this in high school because it has so many symbols and important meanings that should be learned early on in life.
  Biglee821 | Nov 10, 2016 |
A classic tale of mysterious excess and demise. Short but entertaining (for the most part). ( )
  deldevries | Nov 8, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 777 (next | show all)
The Great Gatsby is a romance novel that written by American Author F.Scott Fitzgerald.This novel is talk about the New Yorker in 1900s.The Great Gatsby is a classic piece of American fiction. It is a novel full of triumph and tragedy.Nick Carraway is the narrator, or storyteller, of The Great Gatsby, but he is not the story's protagonist, or main character. Instead, Jay Gatsby is the protagonist of the novel that bears his name. Tom Buchanan is the book's antagonist, opposing Gatsby's attempts to get what he wants: Tom's wife Daisy.

The weakness of this book is they using the classic languange and a little difficult to understand.The weakness also about Gatsby affection to Daisy,He spends that money on lavish parties in the hopes that she will show up.When she finally spends time with him, for the first time in many years, he naively believes that she will leave Tom for him but,unfortunately she is not.

However,the strength of this book is the writer are using the unique title so the reader are feel sympathy and curious about it, also the characteristic about Jay Gatsby that teach the reader many lesson.

To conclude,this book is the very recommended book,especially High School students because Fitzgerald’s novel is a portal to the savage heart of the human spirit, and wonders at our enormous capacity to dream, to imagine, to hope and to persevere.
added by Billy_Kululu | editMedia Indonesia, Billy Kululu (Dec 2, 2016)
 
The great Gatsby is truly a romance book like no other.F.SCOTT.Switzgerald describing about the life of New Yorker in 1900s.This novel is very popular many students if high school are required by their teachers to read this book.The narrator of The Great Gatsby is a young man from Minnesota named Nick Carraway. He not only narrates the story but casts himself as the book’s author.As ive read about this book,Gatsby’s personality was nothing short of “gorgeous.”

moreover,the weakness about this book is hard to understand if u are not really pay attention on it.this novel is about a contradiction,Gatsby's idealism makes him blind.He doesn't see that Daisy can't have love and money, just money. Gatsby can't turn back time.He even doesn't see death coming toward him.

However,the strength of this book something quite different from others,it is the charm and beauty of writing,has many important meanings that should be learned early on in life.

To conclude,what i can say is don't be too obsessed just because you have so much money,money ain't last forever.but overall its a magnificent,fantastically, entertaining and enthralling story.
added by Nadilla-Syawie | editThe New York Times, Nadilla Syawie (Dec 1, 2016)
 
"The Great Gatsby" is in form no more than a glorified anecdote, and not too probable at that

What gives the story distinction is something quite different from the management of the action or the handling of the characters; it is the charm and beauty of the writing.
added by danielx | editChicago Tribune, HL Mencken (Jan 23, 2015)
 
I find Gatsby aesthetically overrated, psychologically vacant, and morally complacent; I think we kid ourselves about the lessons it contains. None of this would matter much to me if Gatsby were not also sacrosanct.

There is the convoluted moral logic, simultaneously Romantic and Machiavellian, by which the most epically crooked character in the book is the one we are commanded to admire. There’s the command itself: the controlling need to tell us what to think, both in and about the book. There’s the blanket embrace of that great American delusion by which wealth, poverty, and class itself stem from private virtue and vice. There’s Fitzgerald’s unthinking commitment to a gender order so archaic as to be Premodern: corrupt woman occasioning the fall of man. There is, relatedly, the travesty of his female characters—single parenthesis every one, thoughtless and thin. (Don’t talk to me about the standards of his time; the man hell-bent on being the voice of his generation was a contemporary of Dorothy Parker, Gertrude Stein, and Virginia Woolf, not to mention the great groundswell of activists who achieved the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment. Yet here he is in A Short Autobiography: “Women learn best not from books or from their own dreams but from reality and from contact with first-class men.”)
added by danielx | editVulture, Kathryn Schultz (Jul 4, 2013)
 


It is an impressive accomplishment. And yet, apart from the restrained, intelligent, beautifully constructed opening pages and a few stray passages thereafter—a melancholy twilight walk in Manhattan; some billowing curtains settling into place at the closing of a drawing-room door—Gatsby as a literary creation leaves me cold. Like one of those manicured European parks patrolled on all sides by officious gendarmes, it is pleasant to look at, but you will not find any people inside.

Indeed, The Great Gatsby is less involved with human emotion than any book of comparable fame I can think of. None of its characters are likable. None of them are even dislikable, though nearly all of them are despicable. They function here only as types, walking through the pages of the book like kids in a school play who wear sashes telling the audience what they represent: OLD MONEY, THE AMERICAN DREAM, ORGANIZED CRIME.
 

» Add other authors (15 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
F. Scott Fitzgeraldprimary authorall editionscalculated
Abarbanell, BettinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Amberg, BillCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bickford-Smith, CoralieCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bradbury, MalcolmIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bruccoli, Matthew JosephPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burgess, AnthonyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Burns, TomIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Bush, KenEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cirlin, EdgardCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Colomb, StephanieEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cornils, L.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cugat, FrancisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dean, BruceIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ekvall, ChristianTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ellsworth, JohannaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Folch i Camarasa, RamonTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gyllenhaal, JakeNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hope, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Janssen, SusanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Li, CherlynneCover designersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Liona, VictorTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meyer, FredIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Meyers, JeffreyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Muller, FrankNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Niiniluoto, MarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Olzon, GöstaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pivano, FernandaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prigozy, RuthEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reynolds, GuyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Robbins, TimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schürenberg, WalterPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scourby, AlexanderNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Siegel, HalIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sloan, SamForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Soosaar, EnnTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tanner, TonyIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tournier, JacquesTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tredell, NicolasEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wolff, Lutz-W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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Epigraph
Then wear the gold hat, if that will move her;
      If you can bounce high, bounce for her too,
Till she cry "Lover, gold-hatted, high-bouncing lover,
      I must have you!"
—Thomas Parke D'Invilliers
Dedication
ONCE AGAIN
TO
ZELDA
First words
In my younger and more vulnerable years my father gave me some advice that I've been turning over in my mind ever since.
Quotations
Let us learn to show our friendship for a man when he is alive and not after he is dead.
All right ... I'm glad it's a girl. And I hope she'll be a fool—that's the best thing a girl can be in this world, a beautiful little fool.
This is a valley of ashes—a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens, where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air. Occasionally a line of gray cars crawls along an invisible track, gives out a ghastly creak and comes to rest, and immediately the ash-gray men swarm up with leaden spades and stir up an impenetrable cloud which screens their obscure operations from your sight.
"Whenever you feel like criticizing any one," he told me. "just remember that all the people in this world haven't had the advantages that you've had."
I rented a house ... on that slender riotous island which extends itself due east of new york -- where there are, among other natural curiosities, two unusual formations of land. Twenty miles from the city a pair of enormous eggs, identical in contour and seprated only by a courtesy bay, jut out into the most domesticated body of salt water in the Western hemisphere, the great wet barnyard of Long Island Sound. They are not perfect ovals ... but their physical resembalnce must be a source of perpetual wonder to the gullsthat fly overhead.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
This work is the book.
Wordsworth Classics publication of "The Great Gatsby" by F. Scott Fitzgerald, KS3 Success Workbook Maths Levels 5-8, and "Driving Democracy: Do Power-Sharing Institutions Work?" by Norris, Pippa were falsely combined. This seemed to be driven by the ISBNs.
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[R.L. 7.3, 8 pts]
Set in the 1920s, this is the tragic love story of Jay Gatsby, a dashing, enigmatic millionaire, obsessed with an elusive, spoiled young woman, Daisy Buchanan.
Haiku summary
New neighbor is rich
and throws wild parties for friends.
The American dream.

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0743273567, Paperback)

In 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald announced his decision to write "something new--something extraordinary and beautiful and simple + intricately patterned." That extraordinary, beautiful, intricately patterned, and above all, simple novel became The Great Gatsby, arguably Fitzgerald's finest work and certainly the book for which he is best known. A portrait of the Jazz Age in all of its decadence and excess, Gatsby captured the spirit of the author's generation and earned itself a permanent place in American mythology. Self-made, self-invented millionaire Jay Gatsby embodies some of Fitzgerald's--and his country's--most abiding obsessions: money, ambition, greed, and the promise of new beginnings. "Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that's no matter--tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther.... And one fine morning--" Gatsby's rise to glory and eventual fall from grace becomes a kind of cautionary tale about the American Dream.

It's also a love story, of sorts, the narrative of Gatsby's quixotic passion for Daisy Buchanan. The pair meet five years before the novel begins, when Daisy is a legendary young Louisville beauty and Gatsby an impoverished officer. They fall in love, but while Gatsby serves overseas, Daisy marries the brutal, bullying, but extremely rich Tom Buchanan. After the war, Gatsby devotes himself blindly to the pursuit of wealth by whatever means--and to the pursuit of Daisy, which amounts to the same thing. "Her voice is full of money," Gatsby says admiringly, in one of the novel's more famous descriptions. His millions made, Gatsby buys a mansion across Long Island Sound from Daisy's patrician East Egg address, throws lavish parties, and waits for her to appear. When she does, events unfold with all the tragic inevitability of a Greek drama, with detached, cynical neighbor Nick Carraway acting as chorus throughout. Spare, elegantly plotted, and written in crystalline prose, The Great Gatsby is as perfectly satisfying as the best kind of poem.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:48 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Jay Gatsby had once loved beautiful, spoiled Daisy Buchanan, then lost her to a rich boy. Now, mysteriously wealthy, he is ready to risk everything to woo her back. This is the definitive, textually accurate edition of a classic of twentieth-century literature, The Great Gatsby. The story of the fabulously wealthy Jay Gatsby and his love for the beautiful Daisy Buchanan has been acclaimed by generations of readers. But the first edition contained a number of errors resulting from Fitzgerald's extensive revisions and a rushed production schedule.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 39 descriptions

Legacy Library: F. Scott Fitzgerald

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Audible.com

29 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

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Penguin Australia

8 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141182636, 0140007466, 0141023430, 0582823102, 0141037636, 024195147X, 1922079553, 0734306865

Columbia University Press

An edition of this book was published by Columbia University Press.

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