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I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell by Tucker Max
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I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell (2006)

by Tucker Max

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1,487724,997 (3.31)21
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  1. 00
    Love Italian Style: The Secrets of My Hot and Happy Marriage by Melissa Gorga (Anonymous user)
    Anonymous user: If you need a book about how NOT to behave, and what NOT to expect from decent human beings, this is it. No holds are barred (quite literally, in some cases), so read at your own discretion.
  2. 00
    Apathy and Other Small Victories by Paul Neilan (jbarry)
    jbarry: hilariously and painfully honest!
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» See also 21 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
I cannot star this book. I just can't. It would be like staring a book of the exploits of serial killer and his willing victims. It's just messed up. Do I think Tucker Max is a serial killer, NO. Not what I'm saying here. I'm simply trying to think of a way to compare a person who has little to no respect of human life meeting up with women who are either A. are attracted to the prospect of being one of his "famous" exploits on his blog B. think they can change him C. are just interested in sex D. hate themselves, or E. all of the above. I'm seriously jaded after this book. Well written though!
  breakingbooks | Aug 13, 2014 |
I felt so many emotions reading this book, I am almost unsure how to revew it.

To start, I thought after my last David Sedaris book (and a string of other books like it), that I would officially stop reading books I termed the "I'm an asshole" genre. I don't agree with giving someone a book deal just because they have writing abilities, and the ability to be a complete selfish jerk to everyone they come in contact with.

However, I knew that was what this book was...and I still wanted to read it. I needed, somehow, validation of "How absurd can he REALLY be?" Mind blowing is the answer.

I have an internal conflict with this book. I found Tucker Max to be the most terrible human being ever to walk the face of the earth. Literally, I have seen characters like him in books/tv/movies...but didn't know that kind of person really existed.

But (and we knew a but was coming..) I laughed my butt of reading this book. What does that say about me?

The thought that just kept popping into my head while reading this book is that Tucker Max represents EVERYTHING that is wrong with our country (maybe the world?). As a former teacher, I dealt with so many students who were disrespectful. And I remember thinking, How did they get this way? The answer: role models like Tucker Max (or perhaps Peter Griffin and Homer Simpson?). I do not doubt that Tucker has a pretty high intelligence. But rather than using that intellect to DO something, he makes a living by being an asshole to people. Well, if I were 16 and reading this book or seeing him get a movie deal and MTV shows...I might ask myself why I would bother to try in school--afterall, if I can get money to just be a dickhead to people?? Why not? It's easier than working.

What's worse, is the knowledge that, if there were a book about a person with the opposite qualities of Tucker Max: ie, a book about someone who just went around being nice to people and helping people....would I read it? Probably not. It'd be boring. So, while I can detest Max and the fact that he is only famous for being an ass...I must realize in myself that I contribute to the problem I say I detest.

That is the internal conflict.

One more note on the book itself: Although I laughed, and was shocked, I was bored by his actions halfway. The last half of the book was a DREAD to get though. Funny stuff still happened, but I just didn't care anymore. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
I felt so many emotions reading this book, I am almost unsure how to revew it.

To start, I thought after my last David Sedaris book (and a string of other books like it), that I would officially stop reading books I termed the "I'm an asshole" genre. I don't agree with giving someone a book deal just because they have writing abilities, and the ability to be a complete selfish jerk to everyone they come in contact with.

However, I knew that was what this book was...and I still wanted to read it. I needed, somehow, validation of "How absurd can he REALLY be?" Mind blowing is the answer.

I have an internal conflict with this book. I found Tucker Max to be the most terrible human being ever to walk the face of the earth. Literally, I have seen characters like him in books/tv/movies...but didn't know that kind of person really existed.

But (and we knew a but was coming..) I laughed my butt of reading this book. What does that say about me?

The thought that just kept popping into my head while reading this book is that Tucker Max represents EVERYTHING that is wrong with our country (maybe the world?). As a former teacher, I dealt with so many students who were disrespectful. And I remember thinking, How did they get this way? The answer: role models like Tucker Max (or perhaps Peter Griffin and Homer Simpson?). I do not doubt that Tucker has a pretty high intelligence. But rather than using that intellect to DO something, he makes a living by being an asshole to people. Well, if I were 16 and reading this book or seeing him get a movie deal and MTV shows...I might ask myself why I would bother to try in school--afterall, if I can get money to just be a dickhead to people?? Why not? It's easier than working.

What's worse, is the knowledge that, if there were a book about a person with the opposite qualities of Tucker Max: ie, a book about someone who just went around being nice to people and helping people....would I read it? Probably not. It'd be boring. So, while I can detest Max and the fact that he is only famous for being an ass...I must realize in myself that I contribute to the problem I say I detest.

That is the internal conflict.

One more note on the book itself: Although I laughed, and was shocked, I was bored by his actions halfway. The last half of the book was a DREAD to get though. Funny stuff still happened, but I just didn't care anymore. ( )
  csweder | Jul 8, 2014 |
Horrible book. No a fun read makes you angry and annoyed at this man and people like him. Do not recommend. ( )
  ERBirchfield | Mar 3, 2014 |
Completely hilarious and you'll feel like the biggest jerk in the world for laughing at it. ( )
  Jerry.Yoakum | Jan 24, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 71 (next | show all)
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I used to think that Red Bull was the most destructive invention of the past 50 years.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Tucker Max recounts some of the drunken, sexual, or otherwise debaucherous adventures he has had; and includes "The Famous Sushi Pants Story," "This'll Just Hurt a Little," "The Dog Vomit Story," and others.
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0806527285, Paperback)

My name is Tucker Max, and I am an asshole. I get excessively drunk at inappropriate times, disregard social norms, indulge every whim, ignore the consequences of my actions, mock idiots and posers, sleep with more women than is safe or reasonable, and just generally act like a raging dickhead. But, I do contribute to humanity in one very important way: I share my adventures with the world. —from the Introduction Actual reader feedback:

"I am completely baffled as to how you can congratulate yourself for being a womanizer and a raging drunk, or think anyone cares about an idiot like you. Do you really think that exploiting the insecurities of others while getting wasted is a legitimate thing to offer?"

"Thank you, thank you, thank you—for sharing with us your wonderful tales of drunken revelry, for teaching me what it means to be a man, for just existing so I know that there is another option; I too can say ‘screw the system’ and be myself and have fun. My life truly began when I finished reading your stories. Now, when faced with a quandary about what course of action I should take, I just ask myself, ‘What Would Tucker Do?’—and I do it, and I am a better man for it."

"I find it truly appalling that there are people in the world like you. You are a disgusting, vile, repulsive, repugnant, foul creature. Because of you, I don’t believe in God anymore. No just God would allow someone like you to exist."

"I’ll stay with God as my lord, but you are my savior. I just finished reading your brilliant stories, and I laughed so hard I almost vomited. I want to bring that kind of joy to people. You’re an artist of the highest order and a true humanitarian to boot. I'm in both shock and awe at how much I want to be you."

"You are the coolest person I can even imagine existing. If you slept with my girlfriend, it'd make me love her more."

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:23:25 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Proud of being socially inappropriate and sexually irresponsible, the author shares his carefree experiences.

» see all 3 descriptions

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