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Tiger (The Five Ancestors, Book 1) by Jeff…
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Tiger (The Five Ancestors, Book 1)

by Jeff Stone

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2931738,321 (3.89)1 / 6
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  1. 00
    Across the Nightingale Floor by Gillian Rubinstein (benfulton)
    benfulton: Tiger is aimed at younger readers, but the less fantastic story.
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Showing 1-5 of 15 (next | show all)
"Tiger" is a great book that shows the evolution of a Chinese monk through the years growing up at this Martial Arts temple. This book is the story of Tiger and his "brothers" growing into their "powers" and learning that they need to stop a rouge monk from their past. This boo would be a great book for students to lose themselves in because there is no moral behind this book. The main purpose of this book is to entertain, and the readers will learn a lot about the different martial arts styles in this series.
  brandib90 | Nov 13, 2013 |
Tiger is a great book for young readers who want a simple plot with lots of action. The character is a kung fu trained monk with the spirit and fighting style of a tiger. The plot if full of martial arts, plans for revenge and the typical lessons one would expect in a story from China set in the 1600's. This was a very difficult book to put down, and thanks to the easy writing style it was a very satisfying experience that fit into one sitting. A must-read for young fans of martial arts. ( )
  mirrani | May 27, 2012 |
Recommended Ages: Gr. 5-7

Plot Summary: Fu and his "brothers" are monks at a secret temple. They've spent their whole lives learning how to fight and their practice becomes worthwhile when Ying, a monk at their same temple who has turned evil and returned to kill all 100 monks, Grandmaster, and the brothers. Grandmaster is murdered and the brothers divide, but Fu wants to do something to stop Ying. He goes back to take the scrolls Ying is after and escapes to the woods, where he tries to stop hunters from torturing and killing a tiger and her cub. When he hurts the hunters, he is locked up in a cage and learns from a drunkard ex-monk that the hunter had a reason for killing the tiger (it killed his wife). Eventually, Malao comes to Fu's aid and they continue to try to fight Ying.

Setting: Cangzhen Temple, a secret temple, Japan, not too specific but sometime in the 1900s I think, the monks are just seeing guns for the first time

Characters:
Fu - Tiger, wants to fight evil but doesn't always think everything through
Grandmaster - in charge of the secret temple but may have a reason for keeping it secret and creating an "army"
Malao - monkey, 11 y/o, helps Fu at end
Long - dragon, 13 y/o
Seh - snake, 12 y/o
Hok - crane, 12 y/o, is captured by Ying at end of book
Ying - used to be "brothers" with the other animals but turned to evil after blaming Grandmaster for his best friend's death, wants to be a dragon but is trained as an eagle, wants the scrolls to teach how to be a dragon
Tonglong - Ying's number one soldier, fights Fu and loses so owes Fu a life
Commander Yoo - one of Ying's top soldiers
Governor - Fu sees governor in forest torturing and killing a tiger and reacts by fighting them and knocking his son making his ear bleed causing him to be deaf in that ear. Governor is angry and holds Fu hostage in a cage in his village

Recurring Themes: kung fu, family, fighting, good vs. evil, death, animals, survival

Controversial Issues: violence? graphic? Ying kills Grandfather and cuts off his head

Personal Thoughts: This book had a lot of action and a decent amount of character development, yet when I had less than 30 pages left I had no problem putting it down and going to sleep. It was a easy to read middle grade novel.

Genre: Kung fu fantasy (although I can't think of too many things that are really magical at the moment, except for the how each character is like an animal in the sense that the tiger would have claws

Pacing: starts with brothers listening to the fighting and arguing about whether to get involved, lots of action, but lots of thinking about what to do when stuck

Characters: Most of the main characters are fairly well developed

Frame: setting is very important, would help to know what a monk is otherwise may not understand the term brother

Point of view: Third person omniscient
  pigeonlover | Dec 31, 2010 |
This book was a great type of Chinese Kung fu history.I loved how the cover showed the essence of the book-a picture of the main character of the story's face, and then showed a picture of their name. I thought this book was unique, and was a suspensely riveting story that anyone woul want to read. ( )
  tygers_eye | Sep 14, 2010 |
Really liked this. The author dances an amazing dance around giving his characters superpowers - every second you expect the tiger child to morph into a tiger or display superhuman tigerlike strength or something - but it doesn't happen. Although the main character is identified tightly with a tiger, at least through the end of this book he remains strictly human - a highly trained, child prodigy of a fighting warrior monk human, to be sure - but still a human.

Stone also has the most precise descriptions of martial arts fights I've ever seen in a fiction book. It's just not that often you are told exactly how and why to use a horse stance in a fight, and have it backed up with solid examples. In addition, one scene where a character attempts to execute a difficult kick without proper training, and hurts himself rather badly in the process, is really priceless.

Others have said that these are good books to start non-readers off with, but I'm not sure - I think the drama is built up painstakingly enough that new readers will lose interest fairly quickly. I think the best target reader is the kid who reads a lot and maybe needs a little push to get interested in doing something physical. The author's lucid descriptions of power under control, and the consequences of failing to have either power or control, should really capture the imagination of a bright child. ( )
  benfulton | Aug 4, 2010 |
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Epigraph
Henan Province, China 4348-eary of the Tiger (1650 AD)
Dedication
For Jeanie, forever and always. And then some.
First words
"This is stupid," Fu mumbled from the bottom of the terra-cotta barrel.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0375830723, Paperback)

Twelve-year-old Fu and his temple brothers Malao, Seh, Hok, and Long don’t know who their parents were. Raised from infancy by their grandmaster, they think of their temple as their home and their fellow warrior monks—their “temple brothers”—as their family. Then one terrible night, the temple is destroyed. Fu and his brothers are the only survivors. Charged by their grandmaster to uncover the secrets of their past, the five flee into the countryside and go their separate ways. Book #1 follows Fu as he struggles to find out more and prove himself in the process.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:33:10 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

Five young warrior-monk brothers survive an insurrection and must use the ancient arts to avenge their Grandmaster.

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