HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Gilgamesh: A Novel by Joan London
Loading...

Gilgamesh: A Novel (original 2001; edition 2004)

by Joan London

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
353930,914 (3.63)1 / 87
Member:Ireadthereforeiam
Title:Gilgamesh: A Novel
Authors:Joan London
Info:Grove Press (2004), Edition: Reprint, Paperback, 272 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:Australia, relationships

Work details

Gilgamesh: A Novel by Joan London (2001)

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
A very easy to read novel, a bit far-fetched at times. It seems incredible that our heroine Edith took her young baby on an epic journey from a farm in Western Australia to Armenia to find his father. However Edith had no idea what she was undertaking and her journey becomes a wonderful story of her resilience and the lengths to which she will go to protect her son and follow her "dream". She meets some great characters along the way and the writer links the story of Gilgamesh , a legendary king of Uruk in ancient Mesopotamia with Edith's journey. I really loved her descriptions of the middle eastern countryside and the lifestyles of the people, which contrasted so much with Edith's life experience. ( )
  lesleynicol | Nov 16, 2013 |
I was taken both by the local setting (Nunderup is like Yallingup, Sea House is like Caves House, Busselton and Perth are like Busselton and Perth) and by the fine writing. ( )
  twitham | Apr 7, 2013 |
The writing is succinct yet exquisitely descriptive. A beautiful, sad, and haunting tale. I wanted happiness for the characters (especially Edith and Jim) but instead there was only the reality of hard living. ( )
  Becky221 | Dec 26, 2012 |
This book perfectly expands on the title taken from an ancient book of friendship and adventure. Edith lives with her depressed Russian immigrant mother and her down to earth sister Francis in poverty in Australia. The girls have one pair of shoes between them but Ellen has frivolous dreams of high heels, pretty clothes and dancing that begin when her chubby, charismatic cousin Leopold from England and his beautiful Armenian friend Aram drop in for a visit. The girls learn to enjoy life, and when their company leaves they've learned that they have an ability to change their lives, and their adventures begin. Nothing happens that they would have planned, but they make plans that make their lives and the lives of others change course. Recommended to anyone who wants to read about living in chaos, following the paths that present themselves and finding the path that fits your needs. ( )
1 vote Citizenjoyce | Nov 22, 2011 |
Joan London's debut novel is the story of Edith, a young Australian girl who lives in the bush with her mom and sister. Edith knows the realities of hard country living - her parents' farm never taking off after years of effort. When her cousin, Leopold, and his friend, Aram, arrive for a visit, it's a breath of fresh air. Edith and her family are charmed by the young men's stories and antics, and slowly, Edith falls in love with Aram.

After the men leave, Edith begins to plot her own departure, a worldwide journey to Aram's homeland of Armenia. However, Edith didn't realize that Europe was about to burst with World War II, and as she draws closer to her destination, Edith becomes an unwilling pawn in a political chess match.

The fable Gilgamesh is central to this story, and it fits well with the travels of many characters. London does a wonderful job weaving in texts from the poem to help the reader connect the dots between the fable and the story. In fact, my favorite parts of the book are when Edith is traveling - first on a ship around Africa, then to London, Armenia and finally northern Africa. Each stop on Edith's journey gave the reader a snapshot of life during that time.

Gilgamesh is a quick read - very enthralling with fully developed characters and great plot twists. London's writing is subtle but powerful. Fans of the Orange Prize or literary fiction are sure to enjoy this fast-paced novel. ( )
3 vote mrstreme | Aug 30, 2011 |
Showing 1-5 of 9 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
To Geoffrey
First words
Frank met Ada when she came to the hospital to visit the soldiers.
Quotations
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0802141218, Paperback)

Gilgamesh is a rich, spare, and evocative novel of encounters and escapes, of friendship and love, of loss and acceptance, a debut that marks the emergence of a world-class talent. It is 1937, and the modern world is waiting to erupt. On a farm in rural Australia, seventeen-year-old Edith lives with her mother and her sister, Frances. One afternoon two men, her English cousin Leopold and his Armenian friend Aram, arrive-taking the long way home from an archaeological dig in Iraq-to captivate Edith with tales of a world far beyond the narrow horizon of her small town of Nunderup. One such story is the epic of Gilgamesh, the ancient Mesopotamian king who traveled the world in search of eternal life. Two years later, in 1939, Edith and her young son, Jim, set off on their own journey, to Soviet Armenia, where they are trapped by the outbreak of war. Rich, spare, and evocative, Gilgamesh won The Age Book of the Year Award for Fiction and was shortlisted for the Miles Franklin Literary Award alongside Richard Flanagan's

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:20:35 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

"Gilgamesh is a saga of family, lost love, and the power of storytelling. It is 1937. The modern world, they say, is waiting to erupt. On a tiny farm in far southwestern Australia, seventeen-year-old Edith lives with her mother and her sister, Frances. One afternoon two men, her English cousin Leopold and his Armenian friend Aram, arrive, taking the long way home from an archaeological dig in Iraq." "Leopold and Aram captivate Edith with tales of exotic lands and cultures - among them, the story of Gilgamesh, the legendary king of Uruk in ancient Mesopotamia. Gilgamesh's great journey of mourning after the death of his friend Enkidu, and his search for the secret of eternal life, is to resonate throughout Edith's years. She is captivated by their stories, and by the thought of a world far beyond the narrow horizon of her small down of Nunderup." "Two years later, in 1939, Edith and her young son, Jim, set off on a journey of their own, to Soviet Armenia, where they are trapped by the outbreak of war. This is the story of encounters and escapes, of friendship and love, of loss and acceptance. Marrying the intimate scope of a life with the enormity of war, Gilgamesh examines what happens when we strike out into the world, and how, like the wandering king, we find our way home."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
13 avail.
9 wanted
2 pay5 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.63)
0.5
1
1.5
2 6
2.5 1
3 23
3.5 13
4 30
4.5 6
5 8

Audible.com

2 editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 94,342,992 books! | Top bar: Always visible