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A Hatred for Tulips by Richard Lourie
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A Hatred for Tulips

by Richard Lourie

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875201,183 (3.53)3
  1. 20
    The Diary of a Young Girl by Anne Frank (schatzi)
  2. 00
    Margot: A Novel by Jillian Cantor (BookshelfMonstrosity)
    BookshelfMonstrosity: The famous diary of Holocaust victim Anne Frank inspires these two lyrical, character-driven novels. In Margot, Anne's older sister survives by hiding her Jewishness; A Hatred for Tulip explores why a desperate boy betrays the Franks to save his family.… (more)
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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 5 of 5
A deceptively simple little novel about Amsterdam in the 1940s with a narrator who may - or may not- have informed on the Franks.

This novel really got under my skin. ( )
  laurenbufferd | Nov 14, 2016 |
I had a difficult time putting this book down once I had started it. The writing is great and really drew me into the story. It's a short book, but it definitely packs a punch. ( )
  schatzi | Jan 30, 2010 |
I wanted to be excited about this historical fiction title where the main character tells his brother he is the one who betrayed Anne Frank while she was in hiding during WWII, but somehow the book ended less than what I was expecting. The main character, Joop tells his story of survival in Amsterdam during the war to his brother who was too young to remember much of what happened at the time. ( )
  ShannonMDE | Jan 28, 2008 |
A story of a young boy coming of age in WWII Holland. This book has a bit more complexity than many books in the genre. Instead of presenting evil Germans, sacrificed Jews, and a saintly citizenry risking their lives to harbor Jews, this short books shows the complicated and ambivalent feelings that many of the Dutch had and shows how their own family life and own need for survival contributed to many of their actions. The tie in to Anne Franks's story, revealed in the first few pages, offers a unique historical perspective. ( )
1 vote khuggard | Sep 26, 2007 |
Brief, painful, beautiful and incredible. ( )
  peagreen1 | Sep 21, 2007 |
Showing 5 of 5
Far better than the usual Anne Frank spin-offs, this story is driven by the details of daily life among desperate, ordinary people under the Nazi occupation. And Joop's plight—the fact that in any sense he can be a sympathetic character—raises the universal questions about humanity and guilt.
added by khuggard | editBooklist
 
Lourie's rendering of Anne Frank's fictional betrayer as a callous, misguided youth is stark and deftly written.
added by khuggard | editPublishers Weekly
 
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0312349335, Hardcover)

 "People who don't have secrets imagine them as dark and hidden. It's just the opposite. Secrets are bright. They light you up. Like the bare lightbulb left on in a cell day and night, they give you no rest."
            So thinks Joop, the narrator of this brief and bitter tale, whose secret is like no other. He has kept that secret for more than sixty years, but now his brother---whom he has not seen since the end of the war---has suddenly shown up at his door.
            Having grown up in North America with only the vaguest memories of World War II, Joop's brother has returned to Amsterdam to find out what his childhood in Holland had been like. But what he discovers is much more than he bargained for---he is startled and dismayed to learn of his own role in the betrayal of Anne Frank.
            Transporting readers through the agonizing Nazi takeover of World War II, Joop recounts his role as a boy desiring to feed his starving family. He figures out a way to provide for them, but in doing so, he sets in motion a chain of events that will horrify the entire world.
            Just as he did in the internationally acclaimed The Autobiography of Joseph Stalin, here Richard Lourie takes us into not only a person's mind, a time, and a place, but into the treacherous currents of history that sweep lives away. This gripping fictionalized account of the man who betrayed Anne Frank will not soon be forgotten.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:20:18 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

""People who don't have secrets imagine them as dark and hidden. It's just the opposite. Secrets are bright. They light you up. Like the bare lightbulb left on in a cell day and night, they give you no rest."" "So thinks Joop, the narrator of this brief and bitter tale, whose secret is like no other. He has kept that secret for more than sixty years, but now his brother - whom he has not seen since the end of the war - has suddenly shown up at his door." "Having grown up in North America with only the vaguest memories of World War II, Joop's brother has returned to Amsterdam to find out what his childhood in Holland had been like. But what he discovers is much more than he bargained for - he is startled and dismayed to learn of his own role in the betrayal of Anne Frank. Transporting readers through the agonizing Nazi takeover of World War II, Joop recounts his role as a boy desiring to feed his starving family. He figures out a way to provide for them, but in doing so, he sets in motion a chain of events that will horrify the entire world. Just as he did in the internationally acclaimed Autobiography of Joseph Stalin, here Richard Lourie takes us not only into a person's mind, a time, and a place, but into the treacherous currents of history that sweep lives away. This fictionalized account of the man who betrayed Anne Frank will not soon be forgotten."--BOOK JACKET.… (more)

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