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Barbarossa: The Russian-German Conflict, 1941-45

by Alan Clark

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492636,150 (3.76)1
Carefully researched and beautifully written, this book is a classic of military history. Alan Clark vividly narrates the course of the dramatic and brutal war between the German and Russians on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. From the invasion of Russia mounted on Midsummer's Day 1941 and the German Army's advance to the outskirts of Moscow, to the terrible turning point of Stalingrad and the eventual defeat of the Nazis at the Fall of Berlin after the hard years of fighting and advance by the Red Army, this is epic history narrated by a master.… (more)

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One of the best single volume accounts of WWII I have read. Clark really captures the essence of this monstrous conflict, which is so little understood in the West. Two monstrous ideologies grinding away at each other in a orgy of slaughter that makes the much-vaunted campaign of the Allies in Western Europe look like a children's tea party. The losses are simply staggering. The Allies lost about 150000 men between D-Day and the German surrender - the Soviets lost that many in mere days at Stalingrad. The Germans lost approximately 4.5 million soldiers in the whole of WWII - 3/4 of those were on the Eastern Front. Clark's admiration for the Russian fighting spirit is clear - among other things he demolishes the myth that the Russian armies surrendered meekly in the opening days of the German invasion, As Clark shows, they fought savagely and desperately, much more so than the Germans thought they would. A fantastic book, which can be read and re-read with no loss of interest. ( )
  drmaf | Oct 16, 2013 |
Dated, with some errors,but still perhaps the single best one volume summary on the Eastern Front. It captures the spirit of the Russian people, along with the determined brutality of the German Army. It was my first read on the Eastern Front, and along with "The Forgotten Soldier" shaped my interest into this massive conflict. ( )
  kaki5231 | Jun 3, 2013 |
Insightful, well written and researched epic of the largest and most destructive land battle of WW2. Classically trained and politically astute the author; with occasional effete slips of opinion and frequent pedantic flaunting of his university based foreign vocabulary delivers a book well worth reading. His notes and maps describe and help clarify the decision making process or lack thereof that allowed criminally inept and politically driven leaders to kill millions of German professional soldiers, incredibly brave and driven Russian peasants as well as countless civilians. ( )
  jamespurcell | Jan 30, 2012 |
901 Barbarossa: The Russian-German Conflict, 1941-45, by Alan Clark (read 22 June 1967) I found this an adequate treatment of the subject. ( )
  Schmerguls | Nov 9, 2009 |
superbly written high-level account of the eastern front, from 22 june 1941 all the way through the fall of berlin. this book is a little dated, however (first edition was published around 1965), and the author didn't have access to any soviet documents or historical archives (many of which didn't become available until after 1991). hence much of the book focuses on the inner workings of the german command structure, with little insight into how the soviets actually conducted the war. a much larger portion of the book is dedicated to operations during 1941 and '42 - very little detail is given regarding the soviet offensives beginning in late '43. despite the flaws, still a seminal work and a great read, especially if you're interested in how the germans managed to beat themselves in a war they probably should have won.

if you want to understand how the soviets managed to rally and overwhelm the germans after the first two disastrous years, try the glantz or erickson books. ( )
  Zoetus | Oct 3, 2009 |
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Carefully researched and beautifully written, this book is a classic of military history. Alan Clark vividly narrates the course of the dramatic and brutal war between the German and Russians on the Eastern Front during the Second World War. From the invasion of Russia mounted on Midsummer's Day 1941 and the German Army's advance to the outskirts of Moscow, to the terrible turning point of Stalingrad and the eventual defeat of the Nazis at the Fall of Berlin after the hard years of fighting and advance by the Red Army, this is epic history narrated by a master.

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