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The Rough-Face Girl by Rafe Martin
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The Rough-Face Girl (original 1992; edition 1998)

by Rafe Martin

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1,205806,646 (4.37)9
Member:molly1717
Title:The Rough-Face Girl
Authors:Rafe Martin
Info:Puffin (1998), Paperback, 32 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:native american, fiction, cinderella story

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The Rough-Face Girl by Rafe Martin (1992)

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» See also 9 mentions

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The story is from a Native American folktale based on Cinderella. The 3rd daughter is scared and therefore not as beautiful on the outside as her two older sisters. But her inner beauty shines through and she is everything the invisible being (the prince) is looking for.
  CindyNeils | Jul 29, 2016 |
This Cinderella story comes from the Native American Algonquin Indian tradition. Featuring the classic Cinderella story structure, Rough Face Girl, scarred from having to tend the fire has two cruel older sisters seeking marriage to the Invisible Being(Prince). David Shannon's illustrations add a captivating depth to the traditional folktale.

"The lived together in great gladness and were never parted."
- Rough Race Girl ( )
  JimStork | Jul 15, 2016 |
Only a woman who can see the great, rich, powerful, handsome, and Invisible Being can marry him.

A poor man has three daughters, the youngest of which is scarred from being forced to constantly tend the fire.

The haughty, hardhearted two older girls decide to dress themselves up and attract the attention of the invisible being. They force their poor father to give them rich jewels and clothing. They lie to the Invisible Being’s sister about being able to see him but she uncovers their deception.

When the third daughter asks for pretty clothes and jewelry, her father has none to give. The third daughter uses her skills and creativity to make her ragged clothes as attractive as possible but the villagers laughed at her attempt. She is able to answer the Invisible Being’s sister’s questions correctly. The third daughter sees the Invisible Being in all the beauties of nature. He chooses to marry her and when she bathes in the lake, all her scars are healed.

The full-page, realistic paintings in this book are phenomenal.

I think it is important to include First Nations stories in our children’s experiences as much as possible.

The messages are important. This book is sure to stimulate interesting discussion. ( )
  Bonnie_Ferrante | Jul 10, 2016 |
The genre for Rough-Face Girl is traditional literature. It is a book about the traditional story of Cinderella, but the little girl is Algonquin in this story. She has a scar, but she has true beauty on the inside. I think this can be used in the classroom to show kids that looks are not the only thing that matters and that what is on the inside is the only thing that counts. ( )
  IeshaDavis | Apr 12, 2016 |
I liked this book for two reasons. First, the illustrations enhance the story. The author uses oil paintings in the book, which provide it with a rustic and aged feeling. This contributes to the historical time period that the story takes place in. Along with this, the illustrations are detailed and contribute to the story with their clear portrayal of each characters' emotions throughout the book. With such attention to detail in the illustrations, the pictures help contribute to setting the time period of the story, as well as helping the audience understand the emotions and feelings of each character throughout the story. I also like this book because it pushes the readers to broaden their perspectives and think outside of their comfort zones. The book has the audience think from another person's point of view, and allows them to step into someone else's shoes. The author truly depicts the struggles of the rough-face girl and has the audience empathize with this mistreatment that she endures. For example, the author writes, "The two older daughters were cruel and hardhearted, and they made their youngest sister sit by the fire and feed the flames. When the burning branches popped, the sparks fell on her. . . her hands became burnt and scarred. . . even her face was marked by the fire" (p. 1). The audience is pushed outside of their comfort zone to imagine the mistreatment that the main character endured. The big message of this story is to see people as they truly are, and happiness is not based on appearance. ( )
  kaylafrey | Mar 15, 2016 |
Showing 1-5 of 80 (next | show all)
Based on an Algonquian legend, this Cinderella story is, "in its original form, actually part of a longer and more complex traditional story." Three sisters compete for the love of the Invisible Hunter, who rejects the two beautiful but cruel and hard-hearted sisters for the scarred sister who is beautiful inside. Illustrated with striking full-page, full-color paintings.
 

» Add other authors (4 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Rafe Martinprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Shannon, DavidIllustratorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
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To the enduring vision of the earth's traditional peoples - RM
To Heidi, Bonne Bonne, and Donny - DS
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Once, long ago. there was a a village by the shores of Lake Ontario.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Book description
Traditional/folk and fairy tales. Primary-intermediate. An Algonquin Cinderella story incorporating Shannon’s realistic paintings. The Invisible Being is the coveted husband, and the materialistic sisters cannot see what the Rough-Face Girl sees: the beauty and power in nature. Good for comparative literature, Native American literature/studies. Too wordy for preschool.
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In this Algonquin Indian version of the Cinderella story, the Rough-Face Girl and her two beautiful but heartless sisters compete for the affections of the Invisible Being.

(summary from another edition)

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