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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark…
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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884)

by Mark Twain

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Tom Sawyer (2), Tom Sawyer (1) (2), Tom Sawyer (2) (2)

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
34,12446042 (3.91)1 / 1240
Recounts the adventures of a young boy and an escaped slave as they travel down the Mississippi River on a raft.
  1. 271
    The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain (becca58203, kxlly)
  2. 193
    To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (Wraith_Ravenscroft)
  3. 30
    Searching For Jim: Slavery In Sam Clemens's World (Mark Twain and His Circle) by Terrell Dempsey (pechmerle)
    pechmerle: Tremendously enlightening study of the N.E. Missouri social context from which Twain developed the character of Jim.
  4. 20
    Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson (caflores)
  5. 10
    The Life of Lazarillo de Tormes by Anónimo (caflores)
  6. 00
    Kim by Rudyard Kipling (CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Orphaned kid with plenty of street-smarts embarks on a dangerous journey interwoven with high-stakes matters from the adult world (Slavery/Russo-British Espionage).
  7. 11
    Flash for Freedom! by George MacDonald Fraser (ehines)
  8. 01
    Memed, My Hawk by Yasar Kemal (Eustrabirbeonne)
  9. 68
    The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger (caflores, CGlanovsky)
    CGlanovsky: Disillusioned youth takes off. A liar himself, he despises frauds.
  10. 39
    Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word by Randall Kennedy (bertilak)
  11. 17
    Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi (ateolf)
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English (440)  Spanish (7)  Dutch (3)  German (2)  French (2)  Swedish (1)  Catalan (1)  Italian (1)  Finnish (1)  Norwegian (1)  All languages (459)
Showing 1-5 of 440 (next | show all)
I love, love, love this book. The humor, the sincerity, the narrative voice. Exceptional. That being said, I struggled with that fifth star. Something about the word "nigger," no matter how eloquent and well-executed its context, leaves a bitter taste in the mouth. Intellectually, though, I can appreciate some of what Twain is doing, here. He doesn't patronize his reader by creating in Huck Finn an overly sympathetic character infused with the author's own socio-political pathos. Huck isn't the poster-child for abolitionist propaganda, but a still-burgeoning personality trying to define its own moral good. In fact, it is simply brilliant that Twain ironically reverses Huck's ethical conflict, depicting his reluctance to STEAL a slave from slavery because theft is a sin, and his ultimate decision to toss himself entirely into "wickedness." We love Huck precisely because he wants so badly to do the right thing, whatever that might be.

The scene in which Jim laments his estranged wife and children is particularly moving, for Twain takes care to depict his humanity, though Huck himself is ambivalent about his friend's grief; that's very clever writing.

Michiko Kakutani wrote a very interesting piece in the New York Times about some politically correct editions of the text; the word "nigger" has been replaced with something more palatable for contemporary readers, but with all due respect, completely unrealistic for the novel's characters. Kakutani explains that "'Huckleberry Finn' actually stands as a powerful indictment of slavery (with Nigger Jim its most noble character)" and that censoring the original removes the possibility "of using its contested language as an opportunity to explore the painful complexities of race relations in this country. To censor or redact books on school reading lists is a form of denial: shutting the door on harsh historical realities — whitewashing them or pretending they do not exist." I am a fierce opponent of censorship and could not agree more. Hence, that inexorable little fifth star. ( )
  TheaJean | Jun 2, 2020 |
I'm awfully afraid about reviewing this here book. The pooooolice might be coming up here to give me my what-fors because I done be talking about plot and meaning like as such the author promised me there be none.

Woooooo-weeeee

I ain't never had the authorities after me and don't feel like startin none now.

So, apoligeezies, fair folk, and ooooh! Lookie there! It's a naked man running! Did you ever see such a thing!?

*scrambles out the back side of this review, never to be seen again* ( )
  bradleyhorner | Jun 1, 2020 |
I should probably read this book again, now that I'm older and "wiser" and because the last time I read it I was in 8th grade. I remember being so disappointed by this book, because I LOVE Huck Finn in "Tom Sawyer" which I've read multiple times. I don't remember specific criticisms as it was over 10 years ago, but this is making me want to reread it now and compare, especially cause so many loved it.

(Please note: I am going through all of my read books with an attempt to star and review, at some point, all of these books will have a decent review, I promise.)
( )
  rachelreading | Apr 20, 2020 |
Eh. It's certainly entertaining. It's undeniably a classic. I'm not sure if I had any major lessons learned from it. Not super high on my list of 'must read' titles. ( )
  bhiggs | Apr 7, 2020 |
I "reread" this book on audio, narrated by Elijah Wood.

I haven't read this since high school and I thought it would be fun to listen to, and it was. Elijah's voices were true to the story, and brought an additional level to the depth of this tale.

I'm happy to report that this book held up to my memory of it, and then surpassed it. ( )
  Charrlygirl | Mar 22, 2020 |
Showing 1-5 of 440 (next | show all)
Mark Twain may be called the Edison of our literature. There is no limit to his inventive genius, and the best proof of its range and originality is found in this book, in which the reader's interest is so strongly enlisted in the fortunes of two boys and a runaway negro that he follows their adventures with keen curiosity, although his common sense tells him that the incidents are as absurd and fantastic in many ways as the "Arabian Nights."
 

» Add other authors (156 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Twain, Markprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Benton, Thomas HartIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Brockway, HarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cardwell, GuyEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coveney, PeterEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
DeVoto, BernardIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dietz, NormanNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dufris, WilliamNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Field, RobinNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fiore, Peter M.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fraley, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giphart, EmyTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hagon, GarrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hill, DickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kazin, AlfredAfterwordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kemble, Edward W.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krüger, LoreTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
McKay, DonaldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Minton, HaroldIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neilson, KeithPrefacesecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
O'Meally, Robert G.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Parker, TomNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ribas, MeritxellTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Seelye, JohnIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Smith, Henry NashEditorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Stegner, WallaceIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Swahn, Sven ChristerTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Trier, WalterIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vidal i Tubau, JordiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ward, ColinIntroductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Whittam, GeoffreyIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wood, ElijahNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

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You don't know about me without you have read a book by the name of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer; but that ain't no matter.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (5)

No library descriptions found.

Book description
This is the story of a boy and an escaped slave as they travel down the Mississippi River. it's a story of friendship and family and home.
Audible is pleased to announce the premiere of an exciting new series, Audible Signature Classics, featuring literature’s greatest stories, performed by accomplished stars handpicked for their ability to interpret each work in a new and refreshing way. The first book in the series is Mark Twain’s Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, performed by Elijah Wood.

Ernest Hemingway said, “All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn". One hundred years after its author’s death, this classic remains remarkably modern and poignantly relevant. In this brand new edition, Elijah Wood reads Huck in a youthful voice that may be the closest interpretation to Twain’s original intent. His performance captures the excitement and confusion of adolescence and adventure. Best of all, the immediacy of Wood’s energetic reading sweeps listeners up and makes them feel as though they’re along for the ride, as Huck and Jim push their raft toward freedom.
Haiku summary
Run away from home
Lazy Summer down river
Ignorance ain’t bliss

(readafew)

Legacy Library: Mark Twain

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Rating

Average: (3.91)
0.5 7
1 139
1.5 28
2 413
2.5 80
3 1556
3.5 287
4 2448
4.5 249
5 2324

Penguin Australia

9 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 0141439645, 0142437174, 0141023619, 0141321091, 0451530942, 0141045183, 0143105949, 0141334843, 0141199008

HighBridge Audio

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge Audio.

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HighBridge

An edition of this book was published by HighBridge.

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Tantor Media

An edition of this book was published by Tantor Media.

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Recorded Books

An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1909175854, 1909175862

 

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