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Adventure Capitalist: The Ultimate Road Trip…
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Adventure Capitalist: The Ultimate Road Trip

by Jim Rogers

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Dated at this point, but a worthwhile read if one is interested in how badly dysfunctional the world we live in is.

Rogers is a surprisingly decent writer. Seems like a decent fellow also. ( )
  jmatson | May 26, 2012 |
Following are a few quotes from Jim Rogers, which describe more about his book than I can ever write:
Pg. 202 "...most famines are caused not by a lack of food but by government bungling."
Pg. 246 "With only 3% of its population speaking English, India ... is the 3rd largest English speaking nation in the world, after the U.S. and the U.K."
Pg. 329 "If you learn nothing else in your life, learn not to take your investment advice, or any other advice from the U.S. government - or any other government."
"If you or I kept books like the U.S. government does, we would be thrown in jail."
Pg. 334 Rogers quotes Hemingway: "The first panacea for a mismanaged nation is inflation of the currency; the second is war. Both bring temporary prosperity; both bring a permanent ruin. Both are the refuge of political and economic opportunists."

After my own trip around the world, I had feelings similar to Rogers':
Pg. 340 "The inner peace I felt upon returning (home) ... did not last. ... A vague sense of unease ... set in almost immediately after I arrived in New York."
"I knew instantly when I walked through the door that I wanted to simplify my life. ... I became protective of my calendar..." ( )
  ds1 | Feb 22, 2010 |
A bit of hyperbole in being the "only person ever to..." in some places, but very good. I wished he had focused a bit more on some places. Very illuminating and intriguing last chapter about the US and Greenspan. ( )
  ORFisHome | Jul 13, 2009 |
A bit of hyperbole in being the "only person ever to..." in some places, but very good. I wished he had focused a bit more on some places. Very illuminating and intriguing last chapter about the US and Greenspan. ( )
  IFREF | Apr 24, 2007 |
It's interesting to see someone's real-life opinions of other countries, but while I usually agree with Jim Rogers about how to invest, I don't agree much with his political/economic analysis. I think he is far too quick to give Republicans (and their equivalents in other countries) the benefit of the doubt, believing their claims that what they are after is a better life for all rather than looting as much as possible as soon as possible.

I think he's also way too naive about how vicious and awful most people are.
In his world, war, deflation, corruption and so on are apparently imposed by external agents (the wicked "politicians") and have nothing to do with the honest, decent countryfolk that inhabit each nation.

I also have to wonder at the mechanisms of his plan for saving Africa, namely debt relief. As others have pointed out, the nations of Africa could repudiate their debt today and not be crippled by interest payments. They do not do so because they want to borrow more. Relieving their debt would allow them to take on a boat-load of new debt, with no obvious reason to believe that the newly acquired debt would be directed towards anything more productive than was the last round.

So what we have is a travel book, written from an unusual viewpoint, whose political musing should, IMHO, be completely ignored. ( )
  name99 | Nov 14, 2006 |
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To the greatest adventure: my first child, in the hope that she will always seek, explore, an question, and understand the world as it really is.
Hilton Augusta Parker Rogers
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I entered the investment business in 1968 with six hundred dollars in my pocket, and I left it in 1980, at the age of thirty-seven, with enough money to satisfy a lifelong yearning for adventure.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0812967267, Paperback)

Drive . . . and grow rich!

The bestselling author of Investment Biker is back from the ultimate road trip: a three-year drive around the world that would ultimately set the Guinness record for the longest continuous car journey. In Adventure Capitalist, legendary investor Jim Rogers, dubbed “the Indiana Jones of finance” by Time magazine, proves that the best way to profit from the global situation is to see the world mile by mile. “While I have never patronized a prostitute,” he writes, “I know that one can learn more about a country from speaking to the madam of a brothel or a black marketeer than from meeting a foreign minister.”

Behind the wheel of a sunburst-yellow, custom-built convertible Mercedes, Rogers and his fiancée, Paige Parker, began their “Millennium Adventure” on January 1, 1999, from Iceland. They traveled through 116 countries, including many where most have rarely ventured, such as Saudi Arabia, Myanmar, Angola, Sudan, Congo, Colombia, and East Timor. They drove through war zones, deserts, jungles, epidemics, and blizzards. They had many narrow escapes.

They camped with nomads and camels in the western Sahara. They ate silkworms, iguanas, snakes, termites, guinea pigs, porcupines, crocodiles, and grasshoppers.

Best of all, they saw the real world from the ground up—the only vantage point from which it can be truly understood—economically, politically, and socially.

Here are just a few of the author’s conclusions:

• The new commodity bull market has started.
• The twenty-first century will belong to China.
• There is a dramatic shortage of women developing in Asia.
• Pakistan is on the verge of disintegrating.
• India, like many other large nations, will break into several countries.
• The Euro is doomed to fail.
• There are fortunes to be made in Angola.
• Nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) are a scam.
• Bolivia is a comer after decades of instability, thanks to gigantic amounts of natural gas.

Adventure Capitalist is the most opinionated, sprawling, adventurous journey you’re likely to take within the pages of a book—the perfect read for armchair adventurers, global investors, car enthusiasts, and anyone interested in seeing the world and understanding it as it really is.


From the Hardcover edition.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:09:09 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

Drive...and Grow Rich!The bestselling author of Investment Biker is back from the ultimate road trip: a three-year drive around the world that would ultimately set the Guinness record for the longest continuous car journey. In Adventure Capitalist, legendary investor Jim Rogers, dubbed "the Indiana Jones of finance" by Time magazine, proves that the best way to profit from the global situation is to see the world mile by mile. "While I have never patronized a prostitute, " he writes, "I know that one can learn more about a country from speaking to the madam of a brothel or a black marketeer than from meeting a foreign minister."

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