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Frannie in Pieces by Delia G. Ephron
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Frannie in Pieces

by Delia G. Ephron

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» See also 3 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
Quirky and poignant at the same time, Frannie's journey through grief over her father's death is one that is entertaining. Frannie discovers aspects of her parents that she never understood - different ways of seeing their marriage and divorce, ways of seeing the complications that their relationship took, and also, ways in which she "chose sides" without realizing it. I liked the way Ms. Ephron played with the idea of seeing things - seeing the light, seeing the puzzle pieces, seeing the past. ( )
  tjsjohanna | May 14, 2010 |
I have such a deep understanding for this book. It’s so real life, but not boring. The puzzle, by far, was the most interesting. But I still can’t figure out how she was pulled into it. Was that literally or was Frannie imagining it? It really made me think a lot. Such a connection for me, with the father dying. Very clean ending, too. I wish the whole deal with the puzzle was explained more in full, though. I’m slightly confused about that. AHS/EK
  edspicer | Sep 21, 2009 |
Frannie has found her father dead in his bathroom, and has a hard time dealing with his loss in her home with her mother and step-father who she can't relate to.
She then finds a puzzle in his home and while putting the pieces together falls into a mystical world. ( )
  coolmama | Jun 25, 2009 |
15- year old Frannie is heartbroken by her father's sudden death - heartbroken, and suddenly afraid of a world where things can kill you instantly. She uncovers a wooden puzzle her father made and bit by bit she rebuilds the pieces of her life - and builds a new picture of her divorced parents.
This is quiet, and nothing much happens, but Frannie is painted with a delicate touch that doesn't over explain, but lets events happen.
I'd give this t people looking for stories about death in the family, or slightly sad realistic stories. The magical realism doesn't intrude much, and is easily ignored as dreams if you hate fantasy. ( )
  francescadefreitas | Jun 23, 2009 |
Just one week before she turns 15, Frannie's father dies. Frannie and her dad had a special connection–they were both artists. Her mother and stepfather don't understand that part of her, and now Frannie feels that no one ever will. Going through her dad's things, Frannie finds a carved wooden box, labeled "Frances Anne, 1000." It contains a hand carved and painted jigsaw puzzle–her birthday present, maybe? As Frannie puts together the pieces of the puzzle, she is transported to a place and time in her father's life she knew nothing about, and learns more about him and her family. Grieving isn't all about loss and memories, though, its about engaging with life again. Frannie is forced to do this when her mom signs her up to be the arts and crafts counselor at a summer camp, where she finds that you don't have to be an artist to be someone worth loving. ( )
  becker | Feb 2, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 11 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (2 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Delia G. Ephronprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Ferland, DanielleNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0060747161, Hardcover)

What does you in—brain or heart?

Frannie asks herself this question when, a week before she turns fifteen, her dad dies, leaving her suddenly deprived of the only human being on planet Earth she feels understands her. Frannie struggles to make sense of a world that no longer seems safe, a world in which one moment can turn things so thoroughly for the worse. She discovers an elegant wooden box with an inscription: Frances Anne 1000. Inside, Frannie finds one thousand hand-painted and -carved puzzle pieces. She wonders if her father had a premonition of his death and finished her birthday present early. Feeling broken into pieces herself, Frannie slowly puts the puzzle together, bit by bit. But as she works, something remarkable begins to happen: She is catapulted into an ancient foreign landscape, a place suspended in time where she can discover her father as he was B.F.—before Frannie.

Delia Ephron makes you laugh and makes you cry—often at the same time!

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:40:42 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

When fifteen-year-old Frannie's father dies, only a mysterious jigsaw puzzle that he leaves behind can help her come to terms with his death.

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