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Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules…
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Around the World in Eighty Days (1873)

by Jules Verne

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Les voyages extraordinaires (book 11)

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English (153)  Italian (4)  Spanish (4)  Swedish (2)  French (2)  Danish (2)  German (2)  Dutch (2)  All (1)  All (1)  Portuguese (1)  Hebrew (1)  All (175)
Showing 1-5 of 153 (next | show all)
I read this on Serial Reader (29 issues). It was one of the most adventuresome classics I have ever read. Not boring at all. My second Verne and have loved both of them. Looking forward to reading Journey to the Center of the Earth. ( )
  Aseleener | Mar 24, 2018 |
Interesting story from a historical perspective. Definitely not something that could be written today. ( )
  bookwyrmm | Sep 23, 2017 |
I have no idea if I’ve read this before – I don’t think so, but it’s hard to tell since I’ve seen versions of the films enough times over the decades to know the story. Except, well, they’re not the story. I don’t think any of the movies I’ve seen – I can think of two, off the top of my head, one starring David Niven and the other Steve Coogan – are at all faithful to the book. Yes, Phineas Fogg accepts a challenge to travel around the world in eighty days. Yes, he thinks he’s failed, only to discover that by travelling east he has gained a day. Yes, he has adventures along the way, and even rescues a young woman who becomes his wife at the end of the book. But in the novel, he meets her in India, when he rescues her from suttee. And I don’t recall a Scotland Yard detective on Fogg’s trail for much of his travels – he believes Fogg stole £50,000 shortly before leaving London. And the final section, in which a desperate Fogg, Passepartout, Fix and Aouda race across the USA to catch a ship to Liverpool… the big set-piece is driving a train over a damaged bridge at high speed so the bridge doesn’t collapse under it. Much of the prose is larded with geography lessons, and while Verne’s didactism is one of the more charming aspects of his novels, here it seems overdone. True, I’m coming at the book more than a century later, as a member of a society considerably better-informed about world geography, and a highly-educated member of that society with an interest in other countries… So much of the exposition was superfluous as far as I was concerned. Further, Fogg’s characterisation as unemotional and po-faced hardly made him a sympathetic protagonist. Perhaps Verne intended this so the reader would indeed think Fogg was the bank robber, but it only made him feel like he had zero depth. Unfortunately, I’m not convinced, from what I remember, that the film adaptations are especially superior. The book is, I suspect, the best version of the story. Which is a bit of a shame. ( )
  iansales | Sep 17, 2017 |
Finally read this - I think I read it before, many many years ago, but the only thing I remember was the end, not any of their travels. It's mildly interesting, but not much to it - actually, the most interesting part is that the "hero" is not the POV character. We get scenes from Passepartout, a few from Fix, a few from Aouda - but Phileas Fogg is seen only from the outside. The closest we come to knowing what's going on with him is a few scenes where the author "watches" him, recounting what he's doing, and speculating on what he's thinking and feeling - and we never get any idea why he'd make the bet in the first place. A very odd twist. But overall, it reads like the world's longest shaggy dog story - chapter after chapter after chapter just to say "and he didn't know he'd lost a day!" Of course, in reality, he would have noticed the day change as soon as the liner landed in America and he was taking a train. And given they missed the liner from the East Coast by less than a day...the whole last section with burning the ship may have been utterly unnecessary. It's an amusing story, I'm glad I've finally read it, and I see no need to ever read it again. ( )
  jjmcgaffey | Aug 25, 2017 |
one of the world's favorite adventure stories, records the travels of Phileas Fogg, an English gentleman, and his French manservant Passepartout, on their fantastic journey of a lifetime around the world.
  jhawn | Jul 31, 2017 |
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» Add other authors (200 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Verne, JulesAuthorprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Benett, LéonIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Butcher, WilliamTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Case, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Colacci, DavidNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Cosham, RalphNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Coumans, KikiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Dale, JimNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Davidson, FrederickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Frith, HenryTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Glencross, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hübner, SabineTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ingpen, RobertIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jacques, RobinIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Johnson, EyvindTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jones, T. LlewTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keller, GerardTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lewis, MercierTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Malvano, Maria VittoriaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Maraja, LibicoIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moser, BarryIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Neuville, Alphonse deIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prichard, MichaelNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Prunier, JamesIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Szecskó, TamásIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Towle, George MakepeaceTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tull, PatrickNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Walter, Frederick PaulTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wilson, Edward A.Illustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed

Is contained in

Seven Novels by Jules Verne

Journey to the Center of the Earth / Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea / Round the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

Tour Du Monde En Jours Le Rayon Vert by Jules Verne

Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, The Mysterious Island, Journey to the Center of the Earth, Around the World in Eighty Days by Jules Verne

Das grosse Jules-Verne-Buch. Reise um die Erde in 80 Tagen - 20.000 Meilen unter dem Meer - Fünf Wochen im Ballon. by Jules Verne

The Works of Jules Verne: Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, A Journey to the Center of the Earth, From the Earth to the Moon, Round the Moon, Around the World in Eighty Days, Short Stories by Jules Verne

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Mr. Phileas Fogg lived, in 1872, at No. 7, Saville Row, Burlington Gardens, the house in which Sheridan died in 1814.
In the year 1872, No. 7 Savile Row, Burlington Gardens -- the house where Sheridan died in 1814 -- was occupied by Phileas Fogg, Esq.
(William Butcher's translation).
In the year 1872, the house at number 7 Savile Row, Burlington Gardens - the house in which Sheridan died in 1814 - was lived in by Phileas Fogg, Esq., one of the oddest and most striking members of the Reform Club, even though he seemed determined to avoid doing anything that might draw attention to himself.
(Penguin 2004 edition translation)
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This LT work should be the complete text of Jules Verne's 1873 novel, Around the World in Eighty Days. Please do not combine it with any abridgements, adaptations, young readers' versions, pop-up books, graphic novels, annotated editions, multi-title compendiums, single volumes of a multi-volume edition, or other, similar works based on the original. Thank you.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 014036711X, Paperback)

For a bet, Phileas Fogg sets out with his servant Passeportout to achieve an incredible journey - from London to Paris, Brindisi, Suez, Bombay, Calcutta, Singapore, Hong Kong, San Francisco, New York and back to London again, all in just eighty days. There are many alarms and surprises along the way - and a last minute setback that makes all the difference between winning and losing.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:17:00 -0400)

(see all 8 descriptions)

Adventure fiction. One night in the reform club, Phileas Fogg bets his companions that he can travel across the globe in just eighty days. Breaking the well-established routine of his daily life, he immediately sets off for Dover with his astonished valet Passepartout. Passing through exotic lands and dangerous locations, they seize whatever transportation is at hand - whether train or elephant - overcoming setbacks and always racing against the clock.… (more)

» see all 78 descriptions

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Penguin Australia

4 editions of this book were published by Penguin Australia.

Editions: 014044906X, 0141035870, 0141194766, 0141331259

Tantor Media

2 editions of this book were published by Tantor Media.

Editions: 140010131X, 140010906X

Urban Romantics

2 editions of this book were published by Urban Romantics.

Editions: 1907832351, 1907832793

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An edition of this book was published by Recorded Books.

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