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Foundation by Isaac Asimov
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Foundation (1951)

by Isaac Asimov

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingConversations / Mentions
12,584204190 (4)2 / 353
  1. 255
    Dune by Frank Herbert (Patangel, JonTheTerrible, philAbrams)
    JonTheTerrible: The pace of these books are similar as well as the topics they cover: society and government. The science plays only a small role in both books but is present enough to successfully build the worlds in which the characters inhabit.
  2. 91
    The Foundation Trilogy by Isaac Asimov (karnoefel)
    karnoefel: de eerste drie foundation boeken in een robuuste hardcoverband. Dit boek was een van de eerste sf boeken die ik las in de jaren 70 in de bibliotheek van Tegelen
  3. 102
    The Caves of Steel by Isaac Asimov (Cecrow)
  4. 72
    Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card (br77rino)
  5. 63
    A Canticle for Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr. (yokai)
  6. 30
    Pebble in the sky by Isaac Asimov (br77rino)
    br77rino: Pebble in the Sky is the first book Asimov wrote regarding the Galactic Empire, a subject he used in his later masterpiece trilogy, Foundation.
  7. 31
    Ringworld by Larry Niven (nar_)
    nar_: Space travelling and interminable, huge lands and space... so huge !
  8. 42
    Foundation's Fear by Gregory Benford (Patangel)
  9. 21
    Psychohistorical Crisis by Donald Kingsbury (goodiegoodie)
  10. 00
    Foundation and Empire by Isaac Asimov (philAbrams)
  11. 11
    Shadow of Heaven by Bob Shaw (Polenth)
  12. 11
    The Chrysalids by John Wyndham (br77rino)
  13. 01
    Even Peons are People: Interplanetary Justice by D. Pak (Anonymous user)
  14. 01
    The Ear, the Eye, and the Arm by Nancy Farmer (missmaddie)
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English (185)  Italian (4)  Dutch (3)  French (3)  Finnish (2)  Slovak (2)  Spanish (1)  Portuguese (1)  German (1)  Catalan (1)  All languages (203)
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I have to ask...What is the big deal with this series???

I have read Foundation, and honestly, it left me flat. I have geared myself up for an epic SciFi novel, and found myself reading something resembling an instruction manual instead. The novel revolves around psychohistorians who successfully apply mathematics to social studies with an end result of detailed prediction of the future. The concept is very interesting I admit. However, Asimov's writing is not that ingenious and leaves much to be desired.

His characters are presented as dehumanized logic obsessed calculators, witch is a fact that doesn't help the story. I understand that these people are supposed to be extremely intelligent and can quickly apply a mathematical formula to any living situation, but if you don't allow a human factor into the equation you have successfully produced a novel in witch you describe how a computer computes. An incredibly boring read. The points that the psychohistorians made throughout the novel were not too groundbreaking, rather than common sense. What goes up, must come down. Everything has its birth, life and death. That includes an enormous Empire. Politicians lie. Religion can be used as a method of control of the masses. The more information you possess, the better chances you may have. Honestly, comparing to some other SciFi authors out there this isn't all that good.

Also lacking was the general plot. After twelve thousand years the Empire is predicted to fall apart and force humanity into something akin a dark age. The fall on it's own cannot be avoided, but its recovery can be sped up if the knowledge of the current Empire is preserved. So a bunch of scientists inhabit a planet on the outer edge of the galaxy and begin their work. Close to the publication of the first edition of the Encyclopedia the planet becomes strategically important to the fractions that arise from what is the beginning of the end of the Empire.

It could have been so much more, I expected so much more....but I was left disappointed. ( )
1 vote IvieHill | Aug 6, 2015 |
You rail against the boorish common masses and their anti-scientific ways, but then go on to invent a new religion complete with a prophet and crusaders. Every time there's a crisis, Seldon appears from the grave in the nick of time so save the day. Yawn.

Second star because the collected body of work (Three-laws and Foundation) had an impact. Doesn't make it good literature though.

---

It pisses me off that I loved this stunted drivel as a kid. So much of what's wrong with me is Asimov's fault. OK, and Heinlein's. ( )
  meekGee | Jul 6, 2015 |
A great story, told in a terribly boring fashion. One-dimensional characters engaged in various trade negotiations, political upheavals and general planning. Dry beyond belief. The concepts are very engaging--religion as a means of control, psychohistory, etc--but the telling of the story leaves much to be desired. Some sections are much better than others, particularly 1 & 3. There is a really good story between the lines here; one that I think would work much, much better as a television series. ( )
  heradas | May 31, 2015 |
This book was such a pleasure to read. I loved the time jumps between chapters and seeing how much the Foundation had changed during those times.

Great descriptions and wonderful language. Asimov has such a gift for writing and telling a story. I can't wait to read the next book.

I will admit the power struggles get a little confusing since there are so many various characters to keep track of. But overall this book was very well done. ( )
  CareBear36 | Mar 19, 2015 |
For twelve thousand years the Galactic Empire has ruled supreme. Now it is dying. But only Hari Sheldon, creator of the revolutionary science of psychohistory, can see into the future—to a dark age of ignorance, barbarism, and warfare that will last thirty thousand years. To preserve knowledge and save mankind, Seldon gathers the best minds in the Empire—both scientists and scholars—and brings them to a bleak planet at the... ( )
This review has been flagged by multiple users as abuse of the terms of service and is no longer displayed (show).
  Tutter | Mar 2, 2015 |
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» Add other authors (46 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Asimov, Isaacprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Brick, ScottNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Foss, ChrisCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Fruttero, CarloForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Giralt, PilarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lucentini, FrancoForewordsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Scaglia, CesareTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, Darrell K.Cover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
Post-1973 reissues:
To the memory of my mother
(1895–1973)
1951 issue:
To my Mother

Of whose Authentic Gray Hairs
Not a few were caused by myself.
First words
HARI SELDON ... born in the 11,988th year of the Galactic Era: died 12,069.

ENCYCLOPEDIA GALACTICA
His name was Gaal Dornick and he was just a country boy who had never seen Trantor before.
Quotations
It pays to be obvious, especially if you have a reputation for subtlety.
Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent.
Violence is the last refuge of the competent.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (3)

Book description
First issued as Ace Double D-110 (with Poul Anderson's "No World of Their Own"); shortly thereafter, reissued as a stand-alone with the same publisher's number (D-110); reissued again a few years later as D-538. One of the stories that make up the 'fix-up' novel "Foundation".
www.amazon.com- Foundation marks the first of a series of tales set so far in the future that Earth is all but forgotten by humans who live throughout the galaxy. Yet all is not well with the Galactic Empire. Its vast size is crippling to it. In particular, the administrative planet, honeycombed and tunneled with offices and staff, is vulnerable to attack or breakdown. The only person willing to confront this imminent catastrophe is Hari Seldon, a psychohistorian and mathematician. Seldon can scientifically predict the future, and it doesn't look pretty: a new Dark Age is scheduled to send humanity into barbarism in 500 years. He concocts a scheme to save the knowledge of the race in an Encyclopedia Galactica. But this project will take generations to complete, and who will take up the torch after him? The first Foundation trilogy (Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation) won a Hugo Award in 1965 for "Best All-Time Series." It's science fiction on the grand scale; one of the classics of the field
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Amazon.com Review (ISBN 0553293354, Mass Market Paperback)

Foundation marks the first of a series of tales set so far in the future that Earth is all but forgotten by humans who live throughout the galaxy. Yet all is not well with the Galactic Empire. Its vast size is crippling to it. In particular, the administrative planet, honeycombed and tunneled with offices and staff, is vulnerable to attack or breakdown. The only person willing to confront this imminent catastrophe is Hari Seldon, a psychohistorian and mathematician. Seldon can scientifically predict the future, and it doesn't look pretty: a new Dark Age is scheduled to send humanity into barbarism in 500 years. He concocts a scheme to save the knowledge of the race in an Encyclopedia Galactica. But this project will take generations to complete, and who will take up the torch after him? The first Foundation trilogy (Foundation, Foundation and Empire, Second Foundation) won a Hugo Award in 1965 for "Best All-Time Series." It's science fiction on the grand scale; one of the classics of the field. --Brooks Peck

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:08:11 -0400)

(see all 9 descriptions)

A band of pscyhologists plant a colony to encourage art, science, and technology in the declining Galactic Empire.

» see all 10 descriptions

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