HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The Deportees And Other Stories by Roddy…
Loading...

The Deportees And Other Stories (2007)

by Roddy Doyle

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
296837,920 (3.86)71
Member:sandieh
Title:The Deportees And Other Stories
Authors:Roddy Doyle
Info:
Collections:Your library
Rating:
Tags:None

Work details

The Deportees: and Other Stories by Roddy Doyle (2007)

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 71 mentions

Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
There are eight short stories in this collection from the famed Irish author Roddy Doyle. Each one deals with Irish natives interacting with individuals from other countries that have immigrated to the Emerald Isle.

There's the slightly creepy tale The Pram, about a nanny who is worried about a haunting. Black Hoodie about racial profiling and young crushes. Another story, Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner, takes us back to the premise of the Spencer Tracy movie of the same name. The Commitments introduces us to Jimmy Rabbitte, a musician hoping to get a band together.

The connecting line throughout the book is the changing face of a country. As Ireland becomes a more diverse place its citizens must adjust to the new world around them.

BOTTOM LINE: I'm intrigued enough by Doyle's writing that I would like to read one of his better-known novels, but I wasn't overly impressed with this collection. ( )
  bookworm12 | Jan 7, 2014 |
Perfection in a short-story collection - especially one by a single author - is a very rare thing in my experience but this must come pretty close. These stories all have Doyle's characteristic mix of humour, pathos, a feel for language and characterisation, ease of reading and thought-provoking themes, and all this is combined with an effortless easy reading style. It's impressive that all these features survive the constraints that the short story form brings.

It's all the more impressive when you read in the foreword how these stories came to be written. All were produced for a new monthly paper Metro Eireann targeted at Dublin's growing multinational community in 2000. They weren't written as whole stories but in 800-word instalments and Doyle apologises that as a result:


"Characters disappear, because I forgot about them. Questions are asked and, sometimes, not quite answered."


The apology is hardly necessary - the flaws were invisible to me although the joins from one instalment to the next are made clear in the typesetting.

There's variety in the settings and characters, from an Irish reworking of "Guess who's coming to dinner", the teenagers trying to teach a lesson about stereotyping to security guards in "Black Hoodie" and the tale of Declan, the black Irish-Glaswegian-American looking for his culture and roots in New York and not finding what he expected. Fans of The Commitments will welcome a late return from Jimmy Rabitte as he puts together a band again in the title story.

There's more. But I wish there were even more. A book that ends far too quickly. ( )
  kevinashley | Apr 6, 2012 |
This was a refreshing change from the last three Roddy books I've read. The style, dialoge, subject matter, etc is more like the Barrytown trilogy than the later Paula Spencer books and Paddy Clarke. I was getting tired of RD through through the last three books, but this has renewed my love of his work. Great dialogue and situations. Very realistic (as far as a non-Irish, non- nigerian American knows).

This is a book of short stories that all revolve around the recent immigration explosion in Dublin/Ireland; specifically Nigerians. I enjoyed all the stories except The Pram, about the Polish Babysitter. Particularly liked The Deportees (the next Barrytown entry! - yay), Home to Harlem (1/4 black Irishman searches for his black grandfather in NY), 57% Irish, I Understand (about the illegal worker being harrassed to commit a crime) and Black Hoodie (about the teenagers exploring stereotyping). Overall great book! ( )
1 vote DuffDaddy | Jan 6, 2012 |
With the eight stories in The Deportees, Roddy Doyle examines what it means to be Irish in the wake of the recent wave of immigration that brought Nigerians, Romanians, Poles and others to Ireland when the economy was strong.

In the forward Doyle tells how the stories were originally published in the Dublin multicultural paper Metro Eireann and how he enjoys the “small terror” of the monthly deadline.

With the mishmash of cultures and nationalities, the stories are fresh and stimulating. In “I Understand” a man fleeing exploitation and death in Africa decides to fight back rather than be exploited by Irish drug traffickers. In “Guess Who’s Coming for Dinner” a genial self-satisfied family man who has never shaken a black hand deals with his daughter bringing home an African for dinner. In “The Deportees” – the liveliest and lightest story – Jimmy Rabbitte from The Commitments, now a family man in his thirties, decides to form a multicultural band and have them play Woody Guthrie songs.

In this collection Doyle embraces the new face of Ireland and tells some great stories in the process. ( )
  Hagelstein | Jun 4, 2011 |
Wrenches reality and stereotypes like no other. The man could write cleaning instructions and I'd pay to get a copy. ( )
  mielniczuk | Nov 21, 2009 |
Showing 1-5 of 8 (next | show all)
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Original title
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
Information from the German Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to the English one.
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0670018457, Hardcover)

Eight funny and poignant stories of immigrant experience in contemporary Ireland

The eight tales in Roddy Doyle’s first-ever collection of stories have one thing in common: someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there. In “Guess Who’s Coming for the Dinner,” a father who prides himself on his open-mindedness when his daughters talk about sex is forced to confront his feelings when one of them brings home a black man. “New Boy” describes the first day of school for a nine-year-old boy from Africa; while in “The Pram,” a terrifying ghost story, a Polish nanny grows impatient with her charge’s older sisters and decides—in a new phrase she has learned—to “scare them shitless.” In “57% Irish,” a man decides to devise a test of Irishness by measuring reactions to three things: Riverdance, the song “Danny Boy,” and Robbie Keane’s goal against Germany in the 2002 World Cup. And in the wonderful title story, Jimmy Rabbitte, the man who formed The Commitments, decides that it’s time to find a new band—a multicultural outfit that specializes not in soul music but in the folk songs of Woody Guthrie.

This is classic Roddy Doyle, full of his unmistakable wit and his acute ear for dialogue. With empathy and insight, The Deportees and Other Stories takes a new slant on the immigrant experience, something of increasing relevance in today’s Ireland.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:41:19 -0400)

(see all 5 descriptions)

"Almost all of the funny and poignant tales of Roddy Doyle's first-ever collection of stories have one thing in common: Someone born in Ireland meets someone who has come to live there. In "Guess Who's Coming for the Dinner," a father who prides himself on his open-mindedness when his daughters talk about sex is forced to confront his feelings when one of them brings home a black man. "New Boy" describes the first day of school for a nine-year-old boy from Africa while in "The Pram," a ghost story, a Polish nanny grows impatient with her charge's older sisters and decides - in a new phrase she has learned - to "scare them shitless." In "57% Irish," a man decides to devise a test of Irishness by measuring reactions to three things: "Riverdance," the song "Danny Boy" and Robbie Keane's goal against Germany in the 2002 World Cup.And in the title story, a sequel, of sorts, to Doyle's very first novel, The Commitments, Jimmy Babbitte decides that it is time to form a new band - a multi-cultural outfit that specializes not in soul music but in the folk songs of Woody Guthrie."--BOOK JACKET.General Adult. If you love Doyles novels, youll want to read this first-ever collection of eight stories featuring outsiders looking to belong in Ireland. With a three-city tour.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

» see all 4 descriptions

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
8 avail.
24 wanted
6 pay3 pay

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.86)
0.5
1
1.5 1
2 6
2.5
3 9
3.5 8
4 29
4.5 5
5 15

Audible.com

Three editions of this book were published by Audible.com.

See editions

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

Help/FAQs | About | Privacy/Terms | Blog | Contact | LibraryThing.com | APIs | WikiThing | Common Knowledge | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | 92,982,269 books! | Top bar: Always visible