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La regina dei castelli di carta by Stieg…
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La regina dei castelli di carta (original 2007; edition 2009)

by Stieg Larsson

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
19,368636116 (4.13)585
Member:Cristing
Title:La regina dei castelli di carta
Authors:Stieg Larsson
Info:Marsilio (2009), Perfect Paperback
Collections:Your library
Rating:
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Work details

The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest by Stieg Larsson (2007)

  1. 10
    The Messenger by Daniel Silva (jakemass48)
  2. 00
    Betrayal by Karin Alvtegen (tina1969)
    tina1969: Another swedish author who works has been translated.
  3. 01
    The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (KayCliff)
  4. 615
    The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins (whymaggiemay)
    whymaggiemay: Though written for YA readers, these books have the same feeling of urgency while reading.
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» See also 585 mentions

English (559)  Dutch (19)  Spanish (11)  Swedish (8)  French (8)  Italian (6)  Danish (5)  Norwegian (4)  Catalan (4)  German (4)  Finnish (2)  Hungarian (1)  Hebrew (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  Portuguese (Portugal) (1)  All languages (634)
Showing 1-5 of 559 (next | show all)
Millénium 3 : La reine dans le palais des courants d'air
  guyotvillois | Oct 15, 2018 |
The ending and the beginning of The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest is what made the book good and have a satisfying ending to the series. I didn't like this book as much as the 2nd one but it was still very interesting. What I did dislike about it was the set up of it, the beginning basically tells you everything and then the rest of the book is seeing how Blomkvist and the other figure this out. This made it hard to keep track of what they already know and how they found out, as well as what they have left to figure out. It got a little repetitive and since the reader already knows this information it was getting a bit old and just wanted it to speed up. What compensates for this is the random drama with Berger that has nothing to do with the overall plot. The last part of the book is perfect and is very suspension despite taking place in a courtroom. The actual ending was very well done and not over the top at all.

I was a bit disappointed that Salader's tattoos were never explained nor was anything really done with her sister, but I later discovered the series was planned to be 10 books and that the 4th book went more into her background. It's unfortunate the author passed away and we are left with a incomplete series but I think if it had to be cut short the 3rd book wasn't a bad place to stop. ( )
  wellreadcatlady | Oct 4, 2018 |
I had originally planned on posting each book as a separate entry, however whenever I finished one book, I couldn't seem to take the time to write a post before starting the next one. So I guess I will talk about them as a set. This series consists of The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl Who Played with Fire, and The Girl Who Kicked the Hornets Nest. From what I understand these were the first three in a series the author had intended to be 10 books, but sadly his death limited the vision. His own life and death seem to be as full of intrigue as his books, I have already gotten lost in the articles surrounding the controversy of who has the rights to his work, his family or his long time lover.
These books are about Lisabeth Salander, a girl with a photographic memory and major trust issues that have lead to poor social skills. At first you don't realize Salander is the main character, you think it is the journalist she has been hired to do research for, Mikael Blomkvist. And yes the first book does revolve around him a lot, but he isn't it, Salander is the first book is just a set up, and introduction so to speak to the meat of the story, to Salander and her amazing detective skills, and her amazingly complicated and in many ways tragic life.
During my book club for The Girls with the Dragon Tattoo, one of the members stated that she was annoyed about Lisabeth falling in love with Blomkvist, since he was such and obvious player and so much older. I never saw this as a love story at all, it feels the exact opposite of a love story, it is a mystery thriller with some sex thrown in. Lisabeth falling for Blomkvist isn't really a love story, it is about a socially awkward and walled off individual finally letting some of her walls down and trusting someone besides herself, I think it is sad that she feels so betrayed by Blomkvist, because who she really is betrayed by is herself. She knew going in what he was like and she is mad at herself for falling for him anyways. And because she has never had to deal with those types of feelings she is projecting her hurt and anger at him, rather than herself, I know I have projected bad decisions not the person I made the decision with rather than myself for making that decision too. I think the love angle was thrown in at the end to give a lead in to the next book. And Blomkvist is not bad looking, but he has the personality that puts women at ease and allows them to let their guards down, again why Lisabeth is so mad at him.
This story was about the crimes, the murders, the corruption. I really do think Larsson was trying to make a statement about the corporations in Sweden and the corruption in government. If you read between the lines he really does not like the big companies and he seems to have little faith that the Swedish Government is doing anything to regulate or correct. These books have much more social commentary than I expected, and the next book goes into a similar but new issue. I don't know much about Sweden and how the country is run or its laws, but I can see the same issues being present in the US. This book came out in 2008, right in the middle of the "recession," so I can see how a lot of people could relate because of what was happening at the time. There was so much loss of trust in traders, the stock market and banks, and I think this was published at a great time to ride that wave. At the same time I think it was more than the timing that made this book so good, we are 6 years past and it still grabbed me. Maybe it is because I work with business that are now always not the up and up, and I can see this in action. But I was way more enthralled with the mystery and the uncovering of the corruption, the love story that wasn't was a side bar for me.
In the next two books we really get into Salander's life and why she is the way she is. It makes so much in the first book clearer, and explains why she acts the way she does. By the end of the third book Salander is not healed or whole, but she has started down the path, I would have really loved to see where Larsson had her end up.
For additional reviews please see my blog at www.adventuresofabibliophile.blogspot.com
  Serinde24 | Aug 17, 2018 |
Not enough Salander, quite dull except for the 4-5 chapters that featured her. It does seem to set up a fourth book.... ( )
  Rdra1962 | Aug 1, 2018 |
2nd favorite book of the series. I don't know why I liked it. There didn't really seem to be much of a plot. Surprising for how long it took me to read. (or not) It didn't seem like there was a lot going on. I guess I'd recommend stopping at The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. ( )
  CSKteach | Jul 20, 2018 |
Showing 1-5 of 559 (next | show all)
The tension builds relentlessly as backstories morph into intriguing subplots, threats to the very core of Swedish democracy are uncovered, men in positions of authority continue to abuse their power, and Salander and Blomkvist continue to fight for justice in their different, inimitable styles
added by 4leschats | editBookPage, Sukey Howard (Jun 1, 2010)
 
Larsson was a cerebral, high-minded activist and self-proclaimed feminist who happened to have a God-given gift for pulse-racing narrative. It’s this offbeat combination of attributes — imagine if John Grisham had prefaced his writing career not by practicing law in Mississippi but by heading up the Stockholm office of Amnesty International — that has made the series such a sui generis smash.
 
Still—bad writing is hardly a barrier to success in this genre. A good plot can run right over pages and pages of bad writing. And if there is a bad plot, or an incomprehensible one, great writing can always go around it. By these standards, The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest is a failure. No one should read this book for its plot or its prose.
added by Shortride | editSlate, Michael Newman (May 24, 2010)
 
The best features of Larsson's books are lively, intricately improbable plots. These, however, are set forth in a banal style that demonstrates no more than minimal skills when it comes to most of his characterizations and descriptive writing. It sometimes seems that Larsson's interest in novelistic detail begins and ends with the contents of a sandwich that one of his characters makes before dashing out on some potentially dangerous errand.
 
Cutting nimbly from one story line to another, Larsson does an expert job of pumping up suspense while credibly evoking the disparate worlds his characters inhabit, from the coldblooded bureaucracy of the Security Police to the underground slacker-hacker world of Salander and her friends, from the financially stressed newsroom Erika inherits to the intensive care unit of the hospital where Salander and Zalachenko are recuperating.
 

» Add other authors (17 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Larsson, Stiegprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bjørnson, ElisabethTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Keeland, RegTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kuhn, WibkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kyrö, MarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lexell, MartinTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ortega Román, Juan JoséTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Reichlin, SaulReadersecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vance, SimonNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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It is estimated that some six hundred women served during the American Civil War.
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Sometimes the title is written with the apostrophe (‘) after the s, e.g. Hornets’ instead of Hornet’s.
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Book description
Salander is plotting her revenge - against the man who tried to kill her, and against the government institutions that very nearly destroyed her life. But it is not going to be a straightforward campaign. After taking a bullet to the head, Salander is under close supervision in Intensive Care, and is set to face trial for three murders and one attempted murder on her eventual release. With the help of journalist Mikael Blomkvist and his researchers at Millennium magazine, Salander must not only prove her innocence, but identify and denounce the corrupt politicians that have allowed the vulnerable to become victims of abuse and violence. Once a victim herself, Salander is now ready to fight back.
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If and when Lisbeth Salander recovers, she'll be taken back to Stockholm to stand trial for three murders. With the help of her friend, journalist Mikael Blomkvist, she will not only have to prove her innocence, but also identify and denounce those in authority who have allowed the vulnerable, like herself, to suffer abuse and violence. And, on her own, she will plot revenge--against the man who tried to kill her, and the corrupt government institutions that very nearly destroyed her life.… (more)

(summary from another edition)

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