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A Thousand Splendid Suns Illustrated Edition (original 2007; edition 2009)

by Khaled Hosseini

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20,24368776 (4.28)633
Member:balupitu
Title:A Thousand Splendid Suns Illustrated Edition
Authors:Khaled Hosseini
Info:Riverhead Hardcover (2009), Edition: Ill, Hardcover, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:****
Tags:None

Work details

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (2007)

Recently added bys1047862, gabsy4127, shannonj2022, private library, whsschuler, peterpetcarp, RoxiePoxie4
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» See also 633 mentions

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Showing 1-5 of 597 (next | show all)
A Thousand Splendid Suns is a four part story that revolves around two Afghan women: Mariam and Leila. As political events begin turning Afghanistan into a war zone and a place of fearful uncertainty, we see through these eyes of these two women of how all these things their daily lives. Mariam is a bastard child, sold off as an early bride to an old shoemaker. Leila is brought up to believe that there is worth in education for women. But when circumstance brings these two women together... perhaps both will find what they are looking for.

I thought the book was beautifully written. Just like The Kite Runner, Hosseini has a talent for letting us feel the emotions of all the characters. We smile when they are given a present, we hurt when they hurt, and we love them. It is really beautifully written. And the way Hosseini incorporates true events into this book just makes it deeper. More real.

But, like The Kite Runner, I find myself forgetting what actually happens in the book. Probably because ultimately this is a "slice of life" book and most of life is finding meaning in the mundane. It isn't big and showy action that carries us through this book, but the subtle emotions and the ways the characters react to the world and people around them.

One thing I have to mention is the amount of utter anger and frustration I kept feeling reading through this book. The amount of misogyny and double standards for women, their lack of freedom absolutely makes me furious. And that these women have to deal with it daily - argh ah I hate it. I hate it. That it's so easily incorporated into their lives, that the idea a man's accusing finger always points at a woman, it makes me so mad for these women and, as a woman, makes me so very, very grateful for the freedom I have right now. I wonder what male readers thought after reading this book.

The way the story ends, it is a very hopeful ending. But it doesn't resolve this issue of women's rights at all, and it frustrates me. Obviously Hosseini couldn't resolve it because it hasn't even been changed in the present world, but argh. How can we easily stand by when things like this happen?

Four stars because it was beautifully written and really makes a person think. I can't say that I liked it in the traditional sense because of how much churning frustration it made me feel. But any book that can open my eyes to bigger struggles and make me feel this amount of urgency is deserving of four stars, maybe even higher.
Highly recommended for everyone. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
A Thousand Splendid Suns is a four part story that revolves around two Afghan women: Mariam and Leila. As political events begin turning Afghanistan into a war zone and a place of fearful uncertainty, we see through these eyes of these two women of how all these things their daily lives. Mariam is a bastard child, sold off as an early bride to an old shoemaker. Leila is brought up to believe that there is worth in education for women. But when circumstance brings these two women together... perhaps both will find what they are looking for.

I thought the book was beautifully written. Just like The Kite Runner, Hosseini has a talent for letting us feel the emotions of all the characters. We smile when they are given a present, we hurt when they hurt, and we love them. It is really beautifully written. And the way Hosseini incorporates true events into this book just makes it deeper. More real.

But, like The Kite Runner, I find myself forgetting what actually happens in the book. Probably because ultimately this is a "slice of life" book and most of life is finding meaning in the mundane. It isn't big and showy action that carries us through this book, but the subtle emotions and the ways the characters react to the world and people around them.

One thing I have to mention is the amount of utter anger and frustration I kept feeling reading through this book. The amount of misogyny and double standards for women, their lack of freedom absolutely makes me furious. And that these women have to deal with it daily - argh ah I hate it. I hate it. That it's so easily incorporated into their lives, that the idea a man's accusing finger always points at a woman, it makes me so mad for these women and, as a woman, makes me so very, very grateful for the freedom I have right now. I wonder what male readers thought after reading this book.

The way the story ends, it is a very hopeful ending. But it doesn't resolve this issue of women's rights at all, and it frustrates me. Obviously Hosseini couldn't resolve it because it hasn't even been changed in the present world, but argh. How can we easily stand by when things like this happen?

Four stars because it was beautifully written and really makes a person think. I can't say that I liked it in the traditional sense because of how much churning frustration it made me feel. But any book that can open my eyes to bigger struggles and make me feel this amount of urgency is deserving of four stars, maybe even higher.
Highly recommended for everyone. ( )
  NineLarks | Sep 15, 2014 |
Slow start but the middle to the end was really excellent. ( )
  yougotamber | Aug 22, 2014 |
A touching book! It isn't for the faint hearted with its tough story line. Amazing! ( )
  NatashaGribbin | Aug 10, 2014 |
Algus oli raske, sest see raamat on masendavalt halvasti kirjutatud (tõlgitud?), kuid mida edasi, seda rohkem kaalub põnev lugu Afganistani elust olust läbi aastakümnete üles lugemise vaevuse ja lõpuks harjud ära, et tekst peabki olema üheplaaniline ja lakooniline.
Pean tunnistama, et minu teadmised islamielu kohta pärinevad vaid ühest Jeemenist rääkivast raamatust- Z. Muhseni "Müüdud", mis oli ikka väga räige, ning meediast . Ning ka selle raamatu tutvustus oli ilmselt koostatud minusugust lääneinimest silmas pidades.
Ma arvan, et raamat oleks olnud tegelikult mõjusam, kui loo teljeks oleks olnud nn normaalsed inimesed. Perevägivald, vähemalt minu jaoks, mõjus ühiskonna kallal toime pandava vägivalla taustal väheolulisena. Rahumeelse pere baasil oleks muudatused ühiskonnas ning nende mõjud ilmselt tundunud veel mõjusamad. Aga ju oli selllise stereotüüpse vägivaldse islamiperekonna keskmesse toomine vajalik müügieduks. Ja töötas ju ka minu peal.

Loe edasi
http://indigoaalane.blogspot.com/2010/11/khosseini-tuhat-hiilgavat-paikest.html ( )
  Indigoaalane | Jul 18, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 597 (next | show all)
Hosseini doesn’t seem entirely comfortable writing about the inner lives of women and often resorts to stock phrases. Yet Hosseini succeeds in carrying readers along because he understands the power of emotion as few other popular writers do.
 
Anyone whose heart strings were pulled by Khaled Hosseini's first, hugely successful novel, The Kite Runner, should be more than satisfied with this follow-up. Hosseini is skilled at telling a certain kind of story, in which events that may seem unbearable - violence, misery and abuse - are made readable.
added by mikeg2 | editThe Guardian, Natasha Walter (May 19, 2007)
 

» Add other authors (85 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Khaled Hosseiniprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bourgeois, ValérieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Caspersen, Alis FriisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Divjak, DarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elazar, ZilaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hansen, WTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jęczmyk, AnnaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kāẓimī, BītāTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kokkinou, VasilikēTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kovačić, MarkoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Li, JingyiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lizarazu, Josune ZuzuarreguiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Madureira, ManuelaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mēnōn, RamāTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Middelthon, Elisabet W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moral Bartolomé, GemaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nguyễn, Thị Hương ThảoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nilsson, JohanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nugrahani, BerlianiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Özgören, PürenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pajvančić, NikolaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pradhāna, MadhukarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Purić, MirzahTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rouanet, Maria HelenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Salīm, QaiṣarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Savikurki, KristiinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Šenkyřík, LadislavTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sokolova, Sergei︠a︡Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tsuchiya, MasaoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vaj, IsabellaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vuelta, María PardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wang, Ŭn-ch'ŏlTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Windgassen, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to Haris and Farah, both the noor of my eyes, and to the women of Afghanistan.
First words
Mariam was five years old the first time she heard the word harami.
Quotations
Nobody could count the moons that shined on her roofs,
or the thousand splendid suns that hid behind her walls
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(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Mariam is only fifteen when she is sent to Kabul to marry the troubled and bitter Rasheed, who is thirty years her senior. Nearly two decades later, in a climate of growing unrest, tragedy strikes fifteen-year-old Laila, who must leave her home and join Mariam's unhappy household. Laila and Mariam are to find consolation in each other, their friendship to grow as deep as the bond between sisters, as strong as the ties between mother and daughter. With the passing of time comes Taliban rule over Afghanistan, the streets of Kabul loud with the sound of gunfire and bombs, life a desperate struggle against starvation, brutality and fear, the women's endurance tested beyond their worst imaginings. Yet love can move a person to act in unexpected ways, lead them to overcome the most daunting obstacles with a startling heroism. In the end it is love that triumphs over death and destruction.
Haiku summary
A moving story
Of Mariam and Laila,
Of love and heartache.
(passion4reading)

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Amidst the turmoil and chaos that ensue following the fall of the monarchy in 1973, two Afghan women are thrown together by fate.

(summary from another edition)

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