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A Thousand Splendid Suns Illustrated Edition (original 2007; edition 2009)

by Khaled Hosseini

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19,881None80 (4.28)621
Member:bsima
Title:A Thousand Splendid Suns Illustrated Edition
Authors:Khaled Hosseini
Info:Riverhead Hardcover (2009), Edition: Ill, Hardcover, 384 pages
Collections:Your library
Rating:***1/2
Tags:None

Work details

A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini (2007)

(52) 2007 (109) 2008 (100) abuse (92) Afghanistan (1,637) arranged marriage (76) book club (100) contemporary fiction (89) family (137) fiction (1,613) friendship (208) historical fiction (169) Islam (242) Kabul (92) literature (92) love (79) marriage (65) Middle East (205) novel (217) own (60) read (190) read in 2007 (53) read in 2008 (61) Roman (89) Taliban (318) to-read (237) unread (57) war (363) women (527) women's rights (71)
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» See also 621 mentions

English (588)  Dutch (28)  Spanish (16)  Swedish (8)  Danish (7)  Italian (6)  Finnish (5)  French (5)  Catalan (4)  German (4)  Norwegian (4)  Portuguese (1)  Portuguese (Brazil) (1)  All languages (677)
Showing 1-5 of 588 (next | show all)
I think I actually liked this more than The Kite Runner. I enjoyed reading from the women's points of view, although this being a male author one cannot help but wonder how truly accurate the narrative is. I also like how the book encompasses a broad time frame of Afghanistan's history. ( )
  S.D. | Apr 4, 2014 |
First, this usually isn't my kind of book. In fact I picked it up a bit begrudgingly because it was for book club. It sat around a week, maybe two before I actually started reading. But, but...

The lives of these two girls who became women held me in a tight fisted grip. The story flows easily while being honest, heart wrenching one moment and heart warming the next. Hosseini drew the emotions out of me with very little effort.

I found myself thinking of the women in my life. How they have shaped my growth and personality and wondered what sacrifices they've made. In the end I cried and hoped all the women in my life find their own thousand splendid suns or at least the peace of know their sacrifice meant something to someone. ( )
  CharityBradford | Apr 1, 2014 |
First, this usually isn't my kind of book. In fact I picked it up a bit begrudgingly because it was for book club. It sat around a week, maybe two before I actually started reading. But, but...

The lives of these two girls who became women held me in a tight fisted grip. The story flows easily while being honest, heart wrenching one moment and heart warming the next. Hosseini drew the emotions out of me with very little effort.

I found myself thinking of the women in my life. How they have shaped my growth and personality and wondered what sacrifices they've made. In the end I cried and hoped all the women in my life find their own thousand splendid suns or at least the peace of know their sacrifice meant something to someone. ( )
  CharityBradford | Apr 1, 2014 |
Told from a woman's point of view, this stor made me by turns angry and amazed and ever glad I am an American. ( )
  obedah | Mar 26, 2014 |
Propelled by the same superb instinct for storytelling that made The Kite Runner a beloved classic, A Thousand Splendid Suns is at once an incredible chronicle of thirty years of Afghan history and a deeply moving story of family, friendship, faith, and the salvation to be found in love.

Born a generation apart and with very different ideas about love and family, Mariam and Laila are two women brought jarringly together by war, by loss and by fate. As they endure the ever escalating dangers around them-in their home as well as in the streets of Kabul-they come to form a bond that makes them both sisters and mother-daughter to each other, and that will ultimately alter the course not just of their own lives but of the next generation. With heart-wrenching power and suspense, Hosseini shows how a woman's love for her family can move her to shocking and heroic acts of self-sacrifice, and that in the end it is love, or even the memory of love, that is often the key to survival. ( )
  MarkBeronte | Mar 4, 2014 |
Showing 1-5 of 588 (next | show all)
Hosseini doesn’t seem entirely comfortable writing about the inner lives of women and often resorts to stock phrases. Yet Hosseini succeeds in carrying readers along because he understands the power of emotion as few other popular writers do.
 
Anyone whose heart strings were pulled by Khaled Hosseini's first, hugely successful novel, The Kite Runner, should be more than satisfied with this follow-up. Hosseini is skilled at telling a certain kind of story, in which events that may seem unbearable - violence, misery and abuse - are made readable.
added by mikeg2 | editThe Guardian, Natasha Walter (May 19, 2007)
 

» Add other authors (85 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Khaled Hosseiniprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bourgeois, ValérieTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Caspersen, Alis FriisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Divjak, DarjaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Elazar, ZilaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hansen, WTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Jęczmyk, AnnaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kāẓimī, BītāTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kokkinou, VasilikēTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Kovačić, MarkoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Li, JingyiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lizarazu, Josune ZuzuarreguiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Madureira, ManuelaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Mēnōn, RamāTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Middelthon, Elisabet W.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Moral Bartolomé, GemaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nguyễn, Thị Hương ThảoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nilsson, JohanTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Nugrahani, BerlianiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Özgören, PürenTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pajvančić, NikolaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pradhāna, MadhukarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Purić, MirzahTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Rouanet, Maria HelenaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Salīm, QaiṣarTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Savikurki, KristiinaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Šenkyřík, LadislavTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sokolova, Sergei︠a︡Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Tsuchiya, MasaoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vaj, IsabellaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Vuelta, María PardoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Wang, Ŭn-ch'ŏlTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Windgassen, MichaelTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Dedication
This book is dedicated to Haris and Farah, both the noor of my eyes, and to the women of Afghanistan.
First words
Mariam was five years old the first time she heard the word harami.
Quotations
Nobody could count the moons that shined on her roofs,
or the thousand splendid suns that hid behind her walls
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
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Wikipedia in English (2)

Book description
Mariam is only fifteen when she is sent to Kabul to marry the troubled and bitter Rasheed, who is thirty years her senior. Nearly two decades later, in a climate of growing unrest, tragedy strikes fifteen-year-old Laila, who must leave her home and join Mariam's unhappy household. Laila and Mariam are to find consolation in each other, their friendship to grow as deep as the bond between sisters, as strong as the ties between mother and daughter. With the passing of time comes Taliban rule over Afghanistan, the streets of Kabul loud with the sound of gunfire and bombs, life a desperate struggle against starvation, brutality and fear, the women's endurance tested beyond their worst imaginings. Yet love can move a person to act in unexpected ways, lead them to overcome the most daunting obstacles with a startling heroism. In the end it is love that triumphs over death and destruction.
Haiku summary
A moving story
Of Mariam and Laila,
Of love and heartache.
(passion4reading)

No descriptions found.

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Amidst the turmoil and chaos that ensue following the fall of the monarchy in 1973, two Afghan women are thrown together by fate.

(summary from another edition)

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