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The Rest Is Silence: Death as Annihilation in the English Renaissance (edition 1999)

by Robert N. Watson

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Member:Cariola
Title:The Rest Is Silence: Death as Annihilation in the English Renaissance
Authors:Robert N. Watson
Info:University of California Press (1999), Edition: 1, Paperback, 430 pages
Collections:Your library, Shakespeare, Literary Studies
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Tags:Shakespeare, Literary Criticism

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The Rest Is Silence: Death as Annihilation in the English Renaissance by Robert N. Watson

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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0520219635, Paperback)

How did the fear of death coexist with the promise of Christian afterlife in the culture and literature of the English Renaissance? Robert Watson exposes a sharp edge of blasphemous protest against mortality that runs through revenge plays such as The Spanish Tragedy and Hamlet, and through plays of procreation such as Measure for Measure and Macbeth. Tactics of denial appear in the vengefulness that John Donne directs toward female bodies for failing to bestow immortality, and in the promise of renewal that George Herbert sets against the threat of closure.
Placing these literary manifestations in the context of specific Jacobean deathbed crises and modern cultural distortions, Watson explores the psychological roots and political consequences of denying that death permanently erases sensation and consciousness.

(retrieved from Amazon Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:29:11 -0400)

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