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The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, Part…
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The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, Part 2) (original 1954; edition 1999)

by J.R.R. Tolkien

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36,29621331 (4.39)1 / 480
Frodo and his companions of the ring have been beset by danger during their quest to prevent the ruling ring from falling into the hands of the Dark Lord by destroying it in the Cracks of Doom. They lost the wizard Gandalf in a battle in the Mines of Moria, and Boromir, seduced by the power of the ring, tried to seize it by force. While Frodo and Sam made their escape, the rest of the company was attacked by Orcs. Now they continue the journey alone down th great River Anduin ... alone, that is, save for the mysterious creeping figure that follows wherever they go.… (more)
Member:ThinkingGuy
Title:The Two Towers (The Lord of the Rings, Part 2)
Authors:J.R.R. Tolkien
Info:Houghton Mifflin (1999), Paperback, 352 pages
Collections:Your library
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The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien (1954)

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English (193)  Spanish (6)  French (5)  Swedish (2)  Polish (1)  Finnish (1)  Lithuanian (1)  All languages (209)
Showing 1-5 of 193 (next | show all)
The Two Towers movie has some of my favorite moments in the trilogy, but the Two Towers book is where the moviemakers made most of their controversial changes. My annoyance over movie Faramir's treatment and Frodo's dumb "Go home, Sam" moment have been rekindled. ( )
  AngelClaw | Dec 30, 2019 |
This review is written with a GPL 4.0 license and the rights contained therein shall supersede all TOS by any and all websites in regards to copying and sharing without proper authorization and permissions. Crossposted at WordPress, Blogspot & Librarything by Bookstooge’s Exalted Permission

Title: The Two Towers
Series: Lord of the Rings #2
Author: John Tolkien
Rating: 5 of 5 Stars
Genre: Fantasy
Pages: 436
Format: Digital Edition

Synopsis:


The Fellowship is broken. Gandalf and Boromir are dead, Frodo and Sam have slipped off on their own to find their way into Mordor to destroy the Ring, Merry and Pippin have been captured by Orcs and Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli must decide which set of hobbits to follow and support.

The first quarter of the book follows Merry and Pippin as they have their various adventures. Merry and Pippin are captured by the orcs and are on their way to Orthanc, Saruman's stronghold. Saruman knows that a hobbit holds the One Ring, but he doesn't know which one. The Orc band, however, is ambushed by the riders of Rohan and destroyed. One of the orcs from Sauron had taken the hobbits outside the orc camp to find for himself what Saruman wanted and this kept the hobbits alive during the attack. They proceed into the forest of Fangorn. There they meet the Ent Treebeard and help convince him and the other Ents that Saruman is a real threat and must be dealt with. Their part of the book ends with the Ents and their herds of trees marching off to Orthanc.

The second quarter of the book follows Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli as they try to rescue Merry and Pippin. After the breaking of the Fellowship, Aragorn is torn between following Frodo and Sam or rescuing Merry and Pippin. He chooses to rescue Merry and Pippin as he realizes that Frodo and Sam CHOSE to go off on their own. The three friends begin a tracking expedition and start running after the orcs. They find signs that the Hobbits are alive. They then run into the Riders of Rohan who destroyed the orc band. The Riders didn't see any signs of the Hobbits but the three friends are convinced that the Hobbits are still alive. The three friends find signs that the Hobbits survived the ambush and begin tracking them into the forest of Fangorn. There they meet an old man who they take for Saruman but is revealed as Gandalf returned from the dead. Gandalf lets them know that the Hobbits are safe with the Ents and they (Gandalf and the 3 friends) must begin rousing allies against both Saruman AND Sauron. They all head over to Rohan to get Theoden ready. They find him under the influence of Wormtongue, an ally of Saruman. Gandalf drives Wormtongue out and Theoden rallies his riders. Scouts bring news that Saruman's entire orc army has marched on Rohan and is destroying everything they find. Everyone heads to Helm's Deep, a fortress where the Rohirrim make their last stand. Things are looking very bad for them until a whole forest of living trees and a band of riders led by Gandalf and Theoden's nephew show up. The riders break the siege and the Forest deals with the orcs. Everyone goes to Orthanc. The Ents have destroyed Isengard (the city built around the tower of Orthanc) but Saruman has taken refuge in Orthanc. Gandalf confronts Saruman and casts him out of the Council of the Wise. Wormtongue throws a stone at them that turns out to be a Palantir, a device that allows the user to see around the world and to communicate with other Palantirs.

The final half of the book deals with Frodo and Sam and Gollum as they make their way towards Mordor. Frodo extracts a promise from Gollum to help them. Gollum leads them Mordor but they can't get in. Gollum reveals that he knows a secret way in through a tunnel in one of the mountains. On the way there the Hobbits meet Faramir, Boromir's younger brother. Faramir finds out the secret of the Ring but shows he's a better man than Boromir by not even trying to take the Ring. The Hobbits continue their journey and Gollum leads them to the secret passage. There he disappears and the Hobbits must make their way through the tunnel on their own. They are ambushed by a giant spider named Shelob, who is an evil power on her own. Gollum is her vassal and plans on taking the Ring from the corpses of Frodo and Sam once she has eaten them. With the Phial of Galadriel and Sting, Sam destroys Shelob but not before she stings Frodo. Frodo enters a deathlike state and Sam is convinced he is dead. Sam takes the Ring and realizes the burden to destroy it is now his. Some orcs come along and Sam finds out that Frodo isn't actually dead. The orcs take Frodo to their base and the book ends with Sam using the Ring to follow them so he can rescue Frodo.

My Thoughts:

For a 400+ page book, this felt incredibly short. Things just happen bam, bam, bam! It was great to be honest. Lean, sparse and yet fully fleshed out, the writing here wasn't like some of the stuff we get today, ie, “world building”. Man, save me from “world building” for world building's sake. Tolkien reveals a LOT about his world but it never becomes the point of the story and it always is secondary to the plot. It was masterfully done in my opinion.

Another thing I appreciated, that annoys me with more modern stuff, is that we stuck with one group POV for ¼, ¼ and then ½ of the book. We don't follow a character for one chapter and then skip to another. My literary feet were firmly grounded in each POV instead of jumping and whirling and generally giving me motion sickness (I'm looking at you, John Gwynne and your horrible, terrible, no-good Valor). It was also written in such a way that I wasn't thinking about the other characters not on page. I was fully invested in each group as I read about them.

I mentioned how short this felt. Not only that but the story itself sped by. If I hadn't been reading carefully, so many things are mentioned by a character that aren't fully written out, I would have missed a lot. Tolkien doesn't pad out anything and he expects his readers to be paying attention and not need everything spoon fed to them. As a grumpy “get your YA off my lawn!” man, I appreciate that. It also lends itself towards re-reads, as you will miss some things on each read or not fully grasp the import of a sentence until you've read it again years later.

All of that being said, this does feel very much like the Grandfather of Fantasy. What I expect today and what I am used to (even if I am not fully behind it, like 1000 page tomes) is very different and that colors my perception of this.

Overall, this was a great read and a fantastic way to end the month.

★★★★★ ( )
  BookstoogeLT | Nov 28, 2019 |
När Sam och Frodo gett sig av attackeras resten av brödraskapet av ett gäng orcher och uruk-haier. I ett försök att beskydda de andra två hoberna, Merry och Pippin, som hamnar i klorna på orcherna, blir Boromir dödad. Kvar blir Aragorn med alven Legolas och dvärgen Gimli som bestämmer sig för att rädda Merry och Pippin till varje pris. Men efter sin långa räddningsinsats hittar de otroligt mycket mer än bara två små hober.

För Frodo och hans Sam fortsätter vandringen mot Domedagsberget. Det går sakta och osäkert; de har endast Mordor långt bort i horisonten att navigera sig fram med. Dessutom inser de snart att de inte är ensamma. Någon, eller något, förföljer dem i skuggorna.

Det är svårt att veta exakt vad man ska säga om Härskarringen. Magnifik? Strålande? Mästerverk? Trots att det är svårt att tro det med tanke på hur lång tid det tog för mig att läsa från början till slut så är detta en sådan otroligt mäktig berättelse. Dess karaktärer är fulla av liv oavsett om man älskar eller avskyr dem. Man blir som trollbunden, så inne i berättelsen att inget annat spelar någon roll. Och det är helt okej. ( )
  autisticluke | Nov 14, 2019 |
I enjoyed this book just as much as the first one. I did think it was a little strange that things were broken up as they were; I think I would have enjoyed bouncing back and forth between the different characters' stories to keep things fresh, but each story was told all at once before moving on to the next. Even so, the stories were enjoyable, and I was impressed with how close the movies stuck to the events of the book in a lot of places (even so much as to use some of the same dialogue). ( )
  NovelInsights | Sep 21, 2019 |
Siguiendo con la segunda parte de la Obra Maestra de J.R.R. Tolkien 'El Señor de los Anillos: Las Dos Torres (The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers)', nos traslada a más lugares oscuros como sorprendentes, nos presenta a criaturas misteriosas como antiguas, levantamientos y caídas de los personajes y nos muestra las batallas épicas entre el Bien y el Mal de este viaje épico. Es aquí donde conocemos lo complejo que es el personaje de Gollum (Sméagol).

Una Gran Historia Épica sin duda. ( )
  RafaTenochca | Sep 10, 2019 |
Showing 1-5 of 193 (next | show all)
That 'The Lord of the Rings' should appeal to readers of the most austere tastes suggests that they too now long for the old, forthright, virile kind of narrative... the author has had intimate access to an epic tradition stretching back and back and disappearing in the mists of Germanic history, so that his story has a kind of echoing depth behind it...
 

» Add other authors (24 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
J. R. R. Tolkienprimary authorall editionscalculated
Andersson, ErikTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Beagle, Peter S.Introductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Blok, CorCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Domènech, LuisTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Gaughan, JackCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hildebrandt, GregCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Hildebrandt, TimCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Horne, MatildeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Howe, JohnCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Inglis, RobNarratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Juva, KerstiTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Krege, WolfgangTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lauzon, DanielTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ledoux, FrancisTraductionsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Lee, AlanIllustratorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Ohlmarks, ÅkeTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Olsson, LottaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Palencar, John JudeCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Pennanen, EilaTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Schuchart, MaxTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Sweet, DarrellCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
Westra, Liuwe H.Translatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Epigraph
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all and in the darkness bind them
In the Land of Mordor where the Shadows lie.
Dedication
First words
Aragorn sped on up the hill. Every now and then he bent to the ground. Hobbits go light, and their footprints are not easy even for a Ranger to read, but not far from the top a spring crossed the path, and in the wet earth he saw what he was seeking.
Quotations
"Not asleep, dead".
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
J.R.R. Tolkien's complete work The Lord of the Rings consists of six Books, frequently bound in three Volumes, as follow:
  • Volume I: The Fellowship of the Ring, consisting of Book 1, "The Ring Sets Out" and Book 2, "The Ring Goes South";
  • Volume II: The Two Towers, consisting of Book 3, "The Treason of Isengard," and Book 4, "The Ring Goes East"; and
  • Volume III: The Return of the King, consisting of Book 5, "The War of the Ring," and Book 6, "The End of the Third Age," with Appendices.
This LT Work consists of Volume II, The Two Towers; please do not combine it with any other part(s) or with Tolkien's complete work, each of which have LT Works pages of their own.

CAUTION: It appears that most copies of the title O Senhor dos Anéis: As Duas Torres in Portuguese translation are the complete Volume II of "The Lord of the Rings," published in English as The Two Towers. However, a Brazilian edition of the same title reportedly includes only the first part (of two) of Volume II, roughly corresponding to Book Three of the larger Work, The Treason of Isengard; see O Senhor dos Anéis. Please be mindful of the difference, and only combine records for Works having the same content. Thank you.
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Book description
The Fellowship was scattered. Some were bracing hopelessly for war against the ancient evil of Sauron. Some were contending with the treachery of the wizard Saruman. Only Frodo and Sam were left to take the accursed Ring of Power to be destroyed in Mordor–the dark Kingdom where Sauron was supreme. Their guide was Gollum, deceitful and lust-filled, slave to the corruption of the Ring.
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