HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

The War of the Ring by J.R.R. Tolkien
Loading...

The War of the Ring (1990)

by J. R. R. Tolkien

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
98928,671 (3.88)5

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 5 mentions

Showing 2 of 2
http://nwhyte.livejournal.com/1908266.html

More in-depth analysis of the story of how The Lord of the Rings was written. We start at Helm's Deep, and follow through the end of Book III and Book IV (ie most of The Two Towers and then all of Book V (first half of The Return of the King). Tolkien's biggest problem was getting the chronology to work between four separated groups of protagonists so that they would eventually end up in the same place at the same time; placing the Paths of the Dead smoothly in the narrative was a challenge as well - it's probably the longest single flashback sequence in a book that generally avoids them.

The process of typing up the Helm's Deep / Isengard chapters of The Two Towers seems to have lost a few sentences from Tolkien's manuscript - none crucial but it seems to me that a "definitive" edition of LotR should be published which would at least include them in footnotes.

Finally, I was amused to see that the last person mentioned in the preface by Christopher Tolkien, thanking him for explaining an English folk-song reference, is one Mr. Neil Gaiman. ( )
1 vote nwhyte | Mar 28, 2012 |
As with other books in 'The History of the Lord of the Rings' series, not always an easy read, but interesting to see how the stories developed. ( )
  dpevers | Jul 3, 2009 |
Showing 2 of 2
no reviews | add a review

» Add other authors (3 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Tolkien, J. R. R.primary authorall editionsconfirmed
Tolkien, ChristopherEditorsecondary authorall editionsconfirmed
Lee, AlanCover artistsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
Quotations
Last words
Disambiguation notice
CAUTION: Two of J. R. R. Tolkien's published books are similarly titled The War of the Ring. One is Book 5 of "The Lord of the Rings" when published in a 6- or 7- volume set (that is, each constituent "Book" is a separate volume). The other is Volume VIII in "The History of Middle-Earth" series edited by Christopher Tolkien. This LT Work is Volume VIII in "The History of Middle-Earth" series; please combine and distinguish all copies accordingly. Thank you.
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0618083596, Paperback)

In The War of the Ring Christopher Tolkien takes up the story of the writing of The Lord of the Rings with the Battle of Helm's Deep and the drowning of Isengard by the Ents. This is followed by an account of how Frodo, Sam and Gollum were finally brought to the Pass of Kirith Ungol, at which point J.R.R. Tolkien wrote at the time: 'I have got the hero into such a fix that not even an author will be able to extricate him without labour and difficulty'. Then comes the war in Gondor, and the book ends with the parley between Gandalf and the ambassador of the Dark Lord before the Black Gate of Mordor. In describing his intentions for The Return of the King J.R.R. Tolkien said that 'It will probably work out very differently from this plan when it really gets written, as the thing seems to write itself once it gets going'; and in The War of the Ring totally unforeseen developmenst that would become central to the narrative are seen at the moment of their emergence: the palantir bursting into fragments on the stairs of Orthanc, its nature as unknown to the author as to those who saw it fall, or the entry of Faramir into the story ('I am sure I did not invent him, though I like him, but there he came walking into the woods of Ithilien').

The book is illustrated with plans and drawings of the changing conceptions of Orthanc, Dunharrow, Minas Tirith and the tunnels of Shelob's Lair.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:04:58 -0400)

(see all 3 descriptions)

No library descriptions found.

Quick Links

Swap Ebooks Audio
140 wanted

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.88)
0.5
1
1.5
2 5
2.5
3 39
3.5 1
4 52
4.5 3
5 32

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

You are using the new servers! | About | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 116,925,248 books! | Top bar: Always visible