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Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman
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Seedfolks (original 1997; edition 2003)

by Paul Fleischman

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
1,147927,123 (4.17)22
RebeccaMichelet's review
One day a girl planted dried lima beans into the empty lot next to her home. After being seen by her neighbors, others began planting in the same lot. Once the lot is cleaned out, it becomes the neighborhood's own garden. Each character has a story, and reason, to plant in that garden; and neighbors who did not know one another, became a community. ( )
  RebeccaMichelet | Apr 28, 2012 |
All member reviews
Showing 1-25 of 92 (next | show all)
Seedfolks is a story about community and intersectionality, centered around a budding community garden. Readers gain the perspective of thirteen different voices, all of different cultural backgrounds. This diversity is important because it provides insight into these people's lives, helps students of different cultures and backgrounds relate to characters in the story, and brings hope in togetherness- from their personal lives and through helping each other help a community garden thrive.
  jmitra1 | Oct 25, 2014 |
(4.9)
  mshampson | Oct 15, 2014 |
This inner-weaving of neighborhood voices begins with the voice of Kim, a Vietnamese immigrant. With her simple desire to plant seeds in honor of her farmer father, she begins a chain of events that will ultimately change the lives of the people living in her neighborhood. It is a poetic, powerful story of how a community comes together to create a garden. At first the people are working independently but they soon come to know each other and care for one another. A wonderful story! I like that the last voice in the book is from a woman whose great-grandparents were freed slaves from Louisiana. ( )
  SuPendleton | Jun 25, 2014 |
This is a book all teachers should read before teaching. ( )
  June_Clark | Feb 16, 2014 |
This book is a gem. It's incredibly short, but that doesn't take anything away from it at all. When one girl, grieving the father she never knew, decides to plant some lima beans in a vacant lot near her home, she inadvertently starts a whole community of gardeners in the middle of Gibb Street in Cleveland. People of all races and ethnicities come together, neighbors become friends, and though all are very different, they're all one thing: growers. The chapters each tell the story of a different person who is affected by the garden. I highly recommend this book to anyone who can read and has an extra hour in their life to read it. ( )
  Tahleen | Feb 16, 2014 |
A once vacant, trashy lot is now turning into a neighborhood garden all started by one young girl. The book is the description of a collection of the neighbors own story and contribution to the garden. This story makes a great child's book as they learn the importance of an individual person's story and their different backgrounds. c
  KaraDoren | Dec 16, 2013 |
This was a great book. It was short but very powerful. It can be used to show students how to overlook race and age and just look at who people are. It showed such a community. ( )
  Camsterw27 | Dec 2, 2013 |
This is an AMAZING book. Although it is short, it contains a wealth of depth and introspection. For the classroom, this book can be used to get students excited about creating and participating in a community garden. This book shows the importance of valuing different perspectives, while also demonstrating the importance of having a sense of community. ( )
  DJSimpson | Nov 30, 2013 |
This is a lovely tale of what makes humans, humans. It tells us that we have so much in common and we all have a story to tell. The story connects us to each other and to the Earth. It tells us that the most simple and basic act of growing a garden can bring people of all backgrounds together for a common goal. It is a quick, but satisfying read. The individual stories are rich and layered without being preachy and one-dimensional. A great read for any age. ( )
  cjohnen01 | Nov 17, 2013 |
I read this book with my seventh grade class at the beginning of every school year. It is a very readable (and quick) book to read that completely supports the sense of community that I want to build in my classroom. At the end of the book, I have each of my seventh graders identify a theme that they find in the story. They type it up in large letters, choose a colorful piece of scrapbook paper, and we create a beautiful patchwork quilt on the wall o f my classroom. We are all connected... ( )
  YvetteKolstad | Apr 29, 2013 |
This is more a collection of glimpses of different lives, all joined together by a community garden. The neighborhood is a mixture of different ethnicities and ages and experiences and that is part of the charm of how the garden pulls them together and gives them a sense of community and care for one another. ( )
  tjsjohanna | Apr 12, 2013 |
Each chapter of this volume is told from a different point of view - each unique and eloquent. It is about the year in the life of an abandoned lot in a multi-ethnic neighborhood and how the people come together. ( )
  DK_Atkinson | Apr 1, 2013 |
This would be a GREAT read aloud for anyone who wants to interest students in a school garden or a group of people in a community garden. It is short and comprised of different narratives of characters who are all very different, and with different stories, but come together through one garden.
This would be a great step-off to also introduce personal narrative in connection with science or gardening, and students could create their own narrative with the final project being a book/collection of the class's narratives. ( )
  sriemann | Mar 29, 2013 |
i love this book if you love gardens your love this books ( )
  justice556 | Sep 26, 2012 |
Seedfolks is an inspirational account of how one city neighborhood bands together to turn a trash filled lot into a beautiful garden. It all began when Kim was inspired to honor her deceased father by growing beans in an abandoned lot. Then, more and more neighborhood people started growing items, all for their own reasons. Some people wanted to feel closer to their homeland, some needed something to pass the time, and others were trying to get their exes to notice them again. This garden helped an extremely diverse group of people come together and do something nice for their community while simultaneously fighting the forces that are working against their garden. This book is great for children to see how diverse one community can be and how different other cultures are from their own.

Details: This book was written to interest childre in grades 5-8 and is on a 3.5 reading level. ( )
  vwhitt | Sep 10, 2012 |
RGG: Lovely series of vignettes about an urban, multicultural, multigenerational neighborhood creating a city garden. The resulting empathy for others has an allied behavior aspect.
  rgruberexcel | Sep 3, 2012 |
RGG: Lovely series of vignettes about an urban, multicultural, multigenerational neighborhood creating a city garden. The resulting empathy for others has an allied behavior aspect.
  rgruberexcel | Sep 3, 2012 |
I got this book based on a colleague's recommendation and ended up liking it more than I thought I might. It tells the story of a vacant lot that is transformed by the members of neighboring apartments into a community garden. I guess I was put off by the expectation of a feel-good, we’re-all-in-this-together story but it didn’t read that way and I especially liked how individuals were given some development rather than being just stereotyped characters from any urban neighborhood. I was told but had to see for myself. ( )
  mbrittain | Jul 23, 2012 |
A book aof community and its distinctive yet communicative viewpoints. A narrative that literally starts with a seed planted by a child and moves on to allow everyone their voice. A packed little chapter book that should be revealed to all ages and cultures. ( )
  everydayreader | Jul 5, 2012 |
This story takes place in a vacant lot in the middle of town. This lot is full of garbage and no one ever thinks to plant anything green there. Until one day, a young girl plants her seed behind an old refrigerator. The girl comes back everyday hoping her seed will blossom into a beautiful plant. Once the girl's presence is noticed, the community begin all coming to the garden to plant seeds they believe will help better a situation. For example, a character Curtis believes he can win over his girlfriend. This soil was magical and brought promise to those to planted there. ( )
  SarahChaisson | Apr 30, 2012 |
This novel introduces different races and cultures coming together as a community to plant a garden in a vacant lot - all inspired by the main character, a little girl who planted Lima beans in honor of her father. This book is an easy read for students and has a great diversity of people and shows they people can come together for a greater cause. ( )
  nnicolic | Apr 30, 2012 |
One day a girl planted dried lima beans into the empty lot next to her home. After being seen by her neighbors, others began planting in the same lot. Once the lot is cleaned out, it becomes the neighborhood's own garden. Each character has a story, and reason, to plant in that garden; and neighbors who did not know one another, became a community. ( )
  RebeccaMichelet | Apr 28, 2012 |
In this short novel thirteen different people's stories are told, but all have one focus: the vacant lot. The vacant lot ends up being turned into a wonderful community garden where each and everyone of the characters is able to express themselves through cultivating life in the garden. This book is great for teaching point of view or character analysis. ( )
  LainaBourgeois | Apr 26, 2012 |
One small bean plant turned into a large community garden and one small girl made a difference. Thirteen small vignettes are collected in this book and they are all connected to that garden, from the young Vietnamese girl who plants beans in memory of the father she never knew to the Haitian immigrant who is trying to make his fortune in lettuce. This book is quick and easy to read and it makes an impact. It is a delight. ( )
  MalissaLojszczyk | Apr 26, 2012 |
This novel shows the issues of diversity and the importance if difference in the world. There are 13 chapters to this book, each narrated in the first person by a different character who somehow finds some answer to his/her life's needs through the transformation of a simple garden. There are 13 chapters in this book and each is narrated by a different character who finds his/her needs through the simply neighborhood garden. ( )
  mmgomez1 | Apr 25, 2012 |
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