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The Killing Kind by John Connolly
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The Killing Kind (2002)

by John Connolly

Other authors: See the other authors section.

Series: Charlie Parker (3)

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9401813,263 (3.98)21

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Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
This was another solid book by John Connolly. The character development continues and the level of detail and atmosphere is high. Hopefully this continues in the series. ( )
  Arkrayder | Feb 11, 2018 |
In this book Charlie Parker ha to face a bunch of religious fanatics who can be very creative and cruel in punishing the 'sinners'. Maybe the best of the series so far. Not recommended for arachnophobics! ( )
  TheCrow2 | Oct 4, 2016 |
"In April, 1963, a group of four families left their homes on the eastern seaboard and journeyed north...for two hundred miles... to an area of land close by the town of Eagle Lake, twenty miles south of the border between New Brunswick and Maine. ...The Aroostock Baptists arrived in Eagle Lake on April 15, 1963. By January 1964, the settlement had been abandoned. No trace of the founding families...was ever found again." So writes Grace Peltier in her postgraduate thesis some 37 years later. The thesis is never published: Grace Peltier is found dead in her car. Her father's ex-business partner, a former U. S. Senator ("who came from money so old that some of it jangled on the Mayflower"}, hires local private investigator Charlie "Bird" Parker to investigate the death. Very exciting very grisly, and most important very touching and well written crime novel with a hint of the supernatural. ( )
1 vote Carol420 | May 31, 2016 |
Not one for the arachnophobic! This one kept me reading and feeling like my skin was crawling all at the same time.

Parker is investigating the death of a woman he knew when she was a girl. What he finds is a tangled web of lies and too many spiders... Parker has to deal with his demons and tries to keep his friends alive. Connolly wraps up all the strands of the story into an interesting whole. ( )
1 vote wyvernfriend | Jun 2, 2015 |
Another good thriller featuring Charlie "Bird" Parker, Connolly's former NYPD officer turned private detective.

Forty years after they disappeared, members of a fringe religious cult are discovered, buried in a river bank in back woods Maine. At the same time Parker is hired to investigate the supposed suicide of a graduate student who was investigating the same group. Are these events related? (Of course!)

I'm a sucker for books involving religious cults so I found this one particularly entertaining. I was somewhat disappointed by the villains Connolly created for the story. I had a hard time believing that Parker and his criminal sidekicks Angel and Louis could find them such challenging adversaries.

With each book Connolly has increased the paranormal touches that make this series unique. While they do not help Parker in the resolution of his cases, they do seem to provide him with motivation to keep pursuing the cases. I get the sense that the deaths of his wife and daughter in the first book have created in Parker a psychic link with the dead. I like it. ( )
1 vote Unkletom | May 24, 2015 |
Showing 1-5 of 14 (next | show all)
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» Add other authors (9 possible)

Author nameRoleType of authorWork?Status
Connolly, Johnprimary authorall editionsconfirmed
Bortolussi StefanoTranslatorsecondary authorsome editionsconfirmed
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Dedication
A mi madre
First words
This is a honeycomb world. It hides a hollow heart.
Quotations
There is a dark resource within all of us, a reservoir of hurt and pain and anger upon which we can draw when the need arises. Most of us rarely, if ever, have to delve too deeply into it. That is as it should be because dipping into it costs, and you lose a little of yourself each time, a small part of all that is good and honorable and decent about you, each time you use it you have to go a little deeper, a little further down into the blackness. Strange creatures move through its depth, illuminated by a burning light from within and fueled only by the desire to survive and to kill. The danger in diving into that pool, in drinking from the dark water, is that one day you may submerge yourself so deeply that you can never find the surface again. Give in to it and you’re lost forever.
There is an interconnectedness to all things, a link between what lies buried and what lives above, a capacity for mutability that allows a good act committed in the present to rectify an imbalance in times gone by. that, in the end, is the nature of justice: not to undo the past but, by acting further down the line of time, to restore some measure of harmony, some possibility of equilibrium, so that lives may continue with their burden eased and the dead may find peace in the world beyond this one.
The nature of humanity, its essence, is to feel another’s pain as one’s own, and to act to take that pain away. There is a nobility in compassion, a beauty in empathy, a grace in forgiveness.
This is a honeycomb world. It hides a hollow heart.

The truth of nature, wrote the philosopher Democritus, lies in deep mines and caves. The stability of what is seen and felt beneath our feet is an illusion, for his life is not as it seems. Below the surface, there are cracks and fissures and pockets of stale, trapped air; stalagmites and helactites and unmapped dark rivers that flow ever downward. It is a place of caverns and stone waterfalls, a labyrinth of crystal tumors and frozen columns where history becomes future, then becomes now.

For in total blackness, time has no meaning.

The present is imperfectly layered on the past; it does not conform flawlessly at every point. things fall and die and their decay creates new layers, thickening the surface crust and adding another thin membrane to cover what lies beneath, new worlds resting on the remains of the old. Day upon day, year upon year, century upon century, layers are added and the imperfections multiply. The past never truly does. It is there, waiting, just below the surface of the now. We stumble into it occasionally, all of us, through remembrance and recall. We summon to mind former lovers, lost children, departed parents, the wonder of a single day when we captured, however briefly, the ineffable, fleeting beauty of the world. These are our memories. We hold them close and call them ours, and we can find them when we need them.

But sometimes that choice is made for us: a piece of the present simply falls away, and the past is exposed like old bone. Afterward, nothing can ever be the same again, and we are forced to reassess the form of what we believed to be true in the light of new revelations about its substance. The truth is revealed by a misstep and the sudden sense that something beneath our feet rings false. The past bubbles out like molten lava, and lives turn to ash in its path.
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Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0743456378, Mass Market Paperback)

John Connolly's Every Dead Thing and Dark Hollow were international bestsellers. Now the "compulsively readable" (Publishers Weekly) Connolly returns to heart-pounding form with a crime novel that combines sinister menace with superb style.

THE KILLING KIND

When the discovery of a mass grave in northern Maine reveals the grim truth behind the disappearance of a religious community, private detective Charlie Parker is drawn into a violent conflict with a group of zealots intent on tracking down a relic that could link them to the slaughter. Haunted by the ghost of a small boy and tormented by the demonic killer known as Mr. Pudd, Parker is forced to fight for his lover, his friends...and his very soul.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:02:22 -0400)

(see all 4 descriptions)

John Connolly's Every Dead Thing and Dark Hollow were international bestsellers. Now the "compulsively readable" (Publishers Weekly) Connolly returns to heart-pounding form with a crime novel that combines sinister menace with superb style. THE KILLING KIND. When the discovery of a mass grave in northern Maine reveals the grim truth behind the disappearance of a religious community, private detective Charlie Parker is drawn into a violent conflict with a group of zealots intent on tracking down a relic that could link them to the slaughter. Haunted by the ghost of a small boy and tormented by the demonic killer known as Mr. Pudd, Parker is forced to fight for his lover, his friends and his very soul.… (more)

» see all 5 descriptions

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