HomeGroupsTalkZeitgeist
This site uses cookies to deliver our services, improve performance, for analytics, and (if not signed in) for advertising. By using LibraryThing you acknowledge that you have read and understand our Terms of Service and Privacy Policy. Your use of the site and services is subject to these policies and terms.
Hide this

Results from Google Books

Click on a thumbnail to go to Google Books.

Manalive by G. K. Chesterton
Loading...

Manalive (1912)

by G. K. Chesterton

MembersReviewsPopularityAverage ratingMentions
607424,472 (3.93)19

None.

Loading...

Sign up for LibraryThing to find out whether you'll like this book.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

» See also 19 mentions

English (1)  Czech (1)  Italian (1)  Spanish (1)  All languages (4)
Other people have already written on what this book is about, so I will write on why this book is so good simply taken as fiction. I find this passage, from the Warden's account of the occurences at Brakespeare College, sums it up quite well:

"There is something pleasing to a mystic in such a land of mirrors. For a mystic is one who holds that two worlds are better than one. In the highest sense indeed, all thought is reflection.

"This is the real truth in the saying that second thoughts are best. Animals have no second thoughts; man alone is able to see his own thought double, as a drunkard sees a lamp-post. Man alone is able to see his own thought upside down as one sees a house in a puddle. This duplication of mentality, as in a mirror, is (we repeat) the inmost thing of human philosophy. There is a mystical, even a monstrous truth in the statement that two heads are better than one. But they ought both to grow on the same body."

This is the glory of well-written fiction. Good fiction provides an engaging, lovely story full of themes both mundane and sublime, and it also acknowledges that the story is in essence a reflection of the original world and story God created. The clearer a writer's reflection of the majesty and beauty of this earthly world, the more wondrous the story. Chesterton realized that "a puddle repeats infinity, and is full of light; nevertheless, if analyzed objectively, a puddle is a piece of dirty water spread very thin on mud." And though earthly fiction might be but a thin puddle, it repeats infinity. Manalive reflects this infinity especially well because Chesterton was truly "Manalive."

Definitely one of my top 5 all-time favorite books. ( )
1 vote joshuamclark | Jul 10, 2006 |
no reviews | add a review
You must log in to edit Common Knowledge data.
For more help see the Common Knowledge help page.
Series (with order)
Canonical title
Original title
Information from the Italian Common Knowledge. Edit to localize it to your language.
Alternative titles
Original publication date
People/Characters
Important places
Important events
Related movies
Awards and honors
Epigraph
Dedication
First words
A wind sprang high in the west like a wave of unreasonable happiness and tore eastward across England, trailing with it the frosty scent of forests and the cold intoxication of the sea.
Quotations
"I don't deny," he said, "that there should be priests to remind men that they will one day die. I only say that at certain strange epochs it is necessary to have another kind of priests, called poets, actually to remind them that they are not dead yet."
"It was our weakness and not our strength that put a rich refuse in the sky. These were the rivers of our vanity pouring into the void."
"I am going to hold a pistol to the head of the Modern Man."
The room was comfortably lined with books in that rich and human way that makes the walls seem alive; it was a deep and full, but slovenly, bookcase, of the sort that is constantly ransacked for the purposes of reading in bed.
"What (the undersigned persons ask themselves) is a puddle? A puddle repeats infinity, and is full of light; nevertheless, if analyzed objectively, a puddle is a piece of dirty water spread very thin on mud."
Last words
(Click to show. Warning: May contain spoilers.)
Disambiguation notice
Publisher's editors
Blurbers
Publisher series
Original language
Canonical DDC/MDS

References to this work on external resources.

Wikipedia in English (1)

Book description
Haiku summary

Amazon.com Product Description (ISBN 0486414051, Paperback)

Manalive pits a group of disillusioned young people against Mr. Innocent Smith, a bubbly, high-spirited gentleman who literally falls into their midst. Accused of murder and denounced for repeatedly marrying his wife and attempting to live in various houses, Smith prompts his newfound acquaintances to recognize an important idea: that life is worth living.

(retrieved from Amazon Thu, 12 Mar 2015 18:18:31 -0400)

(see all 2 descriptions)

Publisher description: Perhaps the most light-hearted of all Chesterton's "serious" works, Manalive pits a group of disillusioned young people against Mr. Innocent Smith, a bubbly, high-spirited gentleman who literally falls into their midst. Accused of murder and denounced for repeatedly marrying his wife and attempting to live in various houses (all of which turn out to be his own), Smith prompts his newfound acquaintances to recognize an important idea: that life is worth living.… (more)

» see all 6 descriptions

Quick Links

Popular covers

Rating

Average: (3.93)
0.5 1
1 3
1.5
2 5
2.5
3 17
3.5 4
4 29
4.5 4
5 33

Is this you?

Become a LibraryThing Author.

 

About | Contact | Privacy/Terms | Help/FAQs | Blog | Store | APIs | TinyCat | Legacy Libraries | Early Reviewers | Common Knowledge | 136,366,480 books! | Top bar: Always visible